Posts Tagged rock star birthdays

This Week’s Birthdays (December 4 – 10)

Happy Birthday this week to:

December 04

1915 ● Edward “Eddie” Heywood, Jr. → Popular 40s and 50s jazz and swing pianist, composer and bandleader, “Canadian Sunset” (#2, 1956), died after suffering from Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s diseases on 1/2/1989, age 73
1940 ● Freddy “Boom-Boom” Cannon (Frederico Picariello) → Early and persistent pre-The Beatles rock ‘n roller, “Palisades Park” (#3, 1962) and seven other Top 40 hits between 1959 and 1965
1942 ● James Robert “Bob” Mosley → Bass, vocals and songwriting for 60s San Francisco folk-roots-psych rock Moby Grape, “Omaha” (#88, 1967), continues to write and record music, occasionally with the band, despite being a diagnosed paranoid schizophrenic
1944 ● Anna McGarrigle → Canadian singer/songwriter with sister Kate in 70s-90s light folk duo The McGarrigle Sisters, wrote “Heart Like A Wheel” for Linda Ronstadt (1975)
1944 ● Chris Hillman → Bassist, singer, songwriter and founding member of seminal folk-country-rock The Byrds, “Mr. Tambourine Man” (#1, 1965), country-rock The Flying Burrito Brothers, light country-rock Souther Hillman Furay Band and country-pop Desert Rose Band, “I Still Believe In You” (Country #1, 1988) and nine other Country Top 15 singles
1944 ● Dennis Wilson → Drummer, vocalist and songwriter for surf-pop-rock The Beach Boys, “Good Vibrations” (#1, 1966), solo, drowned in a swimming accident on 12/28/1983, age 39
1945 ● Gary P. Nunn → Texas Hill Country folk, blues and progressive country singer, songwriter and guitarist, wrote “London Homesick Blues” (the theme song to the music TV show Austin City Limits) and numerous other songs covered by multiple artists, played with Jerry Jeff Walker and Michael Martin Murphey as a member of the Lost Gonzo Band, plus Willie Nelson, Rosanne Cash and many others, issued nearly 20 solo albums and received numerous music achievement awards
1947 ● Terry Woods → Mandolin and cittern for Irish folk-punk-rock The Pogues, “Tuesday Morning” (Rock #11, 1993), also played with Steeleye Span, Sweeney’s Men, The Bucks and, briefly, Dr. Strangely Strange
1948 ● Southside Johnny (John Lyon) → Lead vocals and frontman for New Jersey rock ‘n roll bar band Southside Johnny & The Asbury Jukes, “Talk To Me” (1978)
1951 ● Gary Rossington → Guitarist and founding member of raunchy Southern rockers Lynyrd Skynyrd, “Sweet Home Alabama” (#8, 1974), survived the October 1977 plane crash that killed several bandmembers, then founded Rossington-Collins Band with other Skynyrd alumni, “Welcome Me Home” (Mainstream Rock #9, 1988)
1959 ● Bob Griffin → Bassist for roots rock The BoDeans, “Closer To Free” (#16, 1993)
1962 ● Vinnie Dombroski → Lead vocals and songwriter for post-grunge alt rock Sponge, “Molly (16 Candles Down The Drain)” (Modern Rock #3, 1995) and other Detroit rock bands
1967 ● Adamski (Adam Tinley) → Brit dance-pop producer, songwriter and singer, “Killer” (with Seal, UK #1, US Dance #23, 1990)
1969 ● Jay-Z (Shawn Corey Carter) → Producer, Def Jam Records executive, New Jersey Nets part-owner, hugely successful hip hop artist and Grammy-winning rapper, “Empire State Of Mind” (#1, 2009)
1972 ● Justin Welch → Drummer for mixed-gender, post-punk alt rock Elastica, “Connection” (Modern Rock #2, 1994)
1973 ● Kate Rusby → The “First Lady of Young Folkies,” Brit contemporary acoustic folk singer and songwriter, “All Over Again” (UK #6, 2006)

December 05

1922 ● Don Robertson → Country and pop songwriter, wrote or co-wrote multiple hits for others, including “Born To Be With You” for The Chordettes (#5, 1956) and Dave Edmunds (UK #3, 1973), “Please Help Me, I’m Falling” for Hank Locklin (Country #1, 1960) and over 25 songs for Elvis Presley plus one for his own recording, the country-pop novelty “The Happy Whistler” (#6, 1956), died on 3/16/2015, age 82
1932 ● Little Richard (Richard Wayne Penniman) → Pianist, songwriter, legendary musical wildman and key figure in the transformation of R&B to rock ‘n roll, “Long Tall Sally” (#6, 1956) plus ten other Top 40 hits
1932 ● Reverend James Cleveland → The “King of Gospel music”, Grammy-winning singer, arranger and modern soul/Gospel sound innovator who fused church Gospel with jazz and pop influences, died of heart failure on 2/9/1991, age 58
1936 ● Chad Mitchell → Singer-songwriter and frontman for collegiate folk-pop The Chad Mitchell Trio, the group charted eight albums and one Top 50 hit, “Lizzie Borden” (#44, 1962) but missed out on the success enjoyed by other folk revival groups of equal credibility such as The Kingston Trio and Peter, Paul & Mary
1938 ● John Weldon “J.J.” Cale → Roots-blues-rock singer, songwriter and guitarist, one of the originators of the laid-back “Tulsa Sound” mixing country, blues, rockabilly and jazz, a lone Top 40 hit, “Crazy Mama” (#22, 1972) and “After Midnight” (#42, 1972) were his only chart appearances, best known for writing “Cocaine” (Eric Clapton, #30, 1980) and “Call Me The Breeze” (Lynyrd Skynyrd, 1974) among many others and for winning a Grammy Award for the album The Road To Escondido (2007) with Clapton, died following a heart attack on 7/26/2013, age 74
1945 ● Eduardo Delgado Serrato → Original drummer for garage rock legends ? And The Mysterians, “96 Tears” (#1, 1966)
1946 ● Andy Kim (Andrew Youakim) → Canadian pop-rock singer and songwriter, wrote “Sugar Sugar” for bubblegum-pop The Archies (#1, 1969) and scored his own #1 hit with “Rock Me Gently” (#1, 1974), disappeared in the late 70s but resurfaced as “Baron Longfellow” in 1980, continues to record and perform into the 10s
1947 ● Jim Messina → Country-rock guitarist, singer and songwriter with Buffalo Springfield (“For What It’s Worth”, #17, 1967), Poco (“You Better Think Twice”, #72, 1970) and Loggins & Messina, “Your Mama Don’t Dance” (#4, 1972)
1960 ● Les Nemes → Bassist for New Wave funk-pop Haircut 100, “Love Plus One” (#37, 1982)
1960 ● Jack Russell → Lead vocals for hard rock/metal Great White, “One Bitten, Twice Shy” (#5, 1989), survived Rhode Island night club fire in 2003 in which nearly 100 fans died
1965 ● John Rzeznick → Lead singer and guitarist for alt-rock Goo Goo Dolls, “Iris” (#1, 1998)
1968 ● Glen Graham → Drums and percussion for roots-psych-alt rock Blind Melon, “No Rain” (Modern Rock #1, 1993)
1971 ● Craig Gill → Drummer for Brit psych-alt rock Inspiral Carpets, “Two Worlds Collide” (Modern Rock #8, 1992)
1980 ● Christian Smith Pancorvo → Drummer in Brit indie rock Razorlight, “Golden Touch” (UK #9, 2004) and currently Serafin, “Day By Day” (UK #49, 2003)
1980 ● Zainam Higgins → Singer and songwriter for Brit R&B/dance-pop teen sibling girl group Cleopatra, “Cleopatra’s Theme” (#26, 1998)
1982 ● Keri Lynn Hilson → R&B singer and songwriter, wrote hits as part of The Clutch five-person songwriting team, solo, “Knock You Down” (#3, 2009)
1899 ● Sonny Boy Williamson (Aleck “Rice” Miller) → Celebrated Chicago-style blues harmonica player, singer and songwriter, played with Eric Clapton, Jimmy Page and others, The Animals, Van Morrison, The Who, Yardbirds and many others covered his songs, died from a heart attack on 5/25/1965, age 65

December 06

1916 ● Hugo E. Peretti → Songwriter, producer, record label executive, teamed with cousin Luigi Creatore to produce dozens of hit songs for multiple artists, including Sam Cooke‘s “Twistin’ The Night Away” (#9, 1962) and The Isley Brothers‘ “Shout” (#49, 1959), died from undisclosed causes on 5/1/1986, age 69
1920 ● David Warren “Dave” Brubeck → Renowned jazz-pop pianist, bandleader and composer, best known for the enduring jazz-pop “Take Five” (Adult Contemporary #5, 1961) from the album Time Out, the first jazz album to sell upwards of a million copies,, died from heart failure while en route to his cardiologist on 12/5/2012, age 91
1935 ● George Williams → Lead vocals in Philly soul The Tymes, one of the few acts to have their only #1 hits in both the U.S. and the U.K. with different songs – “So Much In Love” (#1, UK #21, 1963) and “Ms. Grace” (#91, UK #1, 1974), left the band in 1978 and relocated to the U.K., died on 7/28/2004, age 66
1936 ● David Ossman → Comedian, novelist, theater producer and member of 60s/70s eclectic, satiric, surrealistic radio-friendly comic quartet The Firesign Theatre, the group’s nearly 40 albums were cult hits, particluarly for college audiences, produced major audio theater broadcasts for National Public Radio during the 80s and live radio plays in the 00s
1939 ● Steve Alaimo → Early 60s teen idol pop singer with nine Billboard Top 100 singles without a Top 40 hit – the most low-enders by any artist anytime – later hosted and co-produced with Dick Clark the American Bandstand spinoff music variety show Where The Action Is (1965-67), became a mildly successful record producer and label owner
1942 ● Robert W. “Robb” Royer → Guitar, keyboards, bass and songwriting for soft MOR pop-rock Bread, “Make It With You” (#1, 1970), co-wrote “For All We Know,” the 1971 Academy Award Best Song of the Year by the Carpenters from the movie Lovers And Other Strangers, songwriting credits include songs written for The Remingtons, Mary Chapin Carpenter, Randy Travis and others
1943 ● Keith West (Keith Alan Hopkins) → Singer, songwriter and frontman for Brit early psych-rock group Tomorrow, then pop-psych solo career, “Excerpt From A Teenage Opera” (UK #2, 1967), now a producer of music
1943 ● Michael George “Mike” Smith → Keyboards and vocals for British Invasion pop-rock Dave Clark Five, “Catch Us If You Can” (#4, 1965) and 11 other Top 25 hits in the US, died from pneumonia on 2/28/2008, age 64
1944 ● Kenneth George “Jonathan” King → Brit singer and songwriter, “Everyone’s Gone To The Moon” (#17, 1965) plus 12 other UK Top 40 singles under various names, record producer, early manager for prog rock Genesis, convicted and jailed (2001) sex offender
1947 ● David Roderick “Fritz” Fryer → Lead guitarist for early 60s Brit pop The Four Pennies, “Juliet” (UK #1, 1964), the most important British Invasion era act with no chart presence in the US, died of pancreatic cancer on 9/2/2007, age 59
1947 ● Kim Simmonds → Founder and guitarist for Brit blues-rock Savoy Brown, “Tell Mama” (#83, 1971)
1947 ● Miroslav Vitous → Czech-born bassist for jazz-rock fusion Weather Report, “Birdland” (1977), solo
1952 ● Randy Rhoads → Up and coming heavy metal/pop-metal guitarist, founder of hard rock Quiet Riot, joined Ozzy Osbourne‘s backing band for landmark albums Blizzard Of Ozz (1980) and Diary Of A Madman (1981), died in a plane crash while on tour in Florida on 3/19/1982, age 29
1954 ● Robert Kane → Lead vocals since 1999 for Brit pub-rock Dr. Feelgood, “Milk And Alcohol” (UK #9, 1979)
1955 ● Edward Tudor-Pole → Leader of Brit punk-rock band Tenpole Tudor, “Swords Of A Thousand Men”, (UK #6, 1981), solo, “Who Killed Bambi?” (1978), TV actor and host
1955 ● Rick Buckler → Drummer for Brit punk-rock/mod revival The Jam, “Town Called Malice” (Mainstream Rock #31, 1982)
1956 ● Peter Buck → Guitarist and songwriter for influential post-punk R.E.M., “The One I Love” (#9, 1987)
1957 ● Adrian Borland → Brit singer, songwriter and guitarist for post-punk, critically successful The Sound from 1979 to 1987, issued five albums as a solo artist before committing suicide on 4/26/1999, age 41
1961 ● David Lovering → Drummer for melodic post-punk alternative rock The Pixies, “Here Comes Your Man” (Modern Rock #3, 1989)
1961 ● Jonathan Melvoin → Multi-instrumentalist session and touring musician for various 80s punk bands, contributed to projects for his sister Wendy Melvoin‘s funk-pop vocal duet Wendy & Lisa as well as for Prince & The Revolution, toured with The Smashing Pumpkins up to his death from a heroin overdose on 7/12/1996, age 34
1962 ● Ben Watt → Guitar, keyboards and vocals in Brit pop-dance-club duo Everything But The Girl, “Missing” (#2, 1995), solo
1964 ● Jeff “Blando” Bland → Guitarist in pop-glam metal Slaughter, “Fly To The Angels” (#19, 1990), died in a car crash on 2/5/1998
1969 ● Mark Gardener → Singer and guitarist for Brit neo-psych shoegazing band Ride, “Twisterella” (Modern Rock #12, 1992)
1969 ● Steven Drozd → Drummer and vocalist for neo-psych alt rock The Flaming Lips, “She Don’t Use Jelly” (#55, 1995)
1970 ● Ulf Ekberg → Keyboards and vocals for Swedish pop-rockers Ace Of Base, “All That She Wants” (#2, 1993)
1896 ● Ira Gershwin (Israel Gershowitz) → With his brother, George Gershwin, one of the greatest songwriters of the early 20th century, Tin Pan Alley stage, film and opera lyricist and librettist, best known their his jazz-influenced classical composition “Rhapsody In Blue” (1924) and the opera Porgy And Bess (1934), continued to write music for decades after his brother’s death in 1937, including “Long Ago (And Far Away)” (#2, 1944) with Jerome Kern from the film Cover Girl (1944), died from cardiovascular disease on 8/17/1983, age 86

December 07

1910 ● Louis Prima → New Orleans jazz band frontman in the 20s, swing combo member in 30s, Big Band leader in the 40s, Las Vegas lounge act with then wife Keely Smith in the 50s (Grammy-winning “That Ol’ Black Magic,” #18, 1958) and pop-rocker in the 60s and 70s, died from pneumonia while in a coma following unsuccessful brain tumor surgery on 8/24/1978, age 67
1924 ● Bent Fabric (Bent Fabricius-Bjerre) → One hit wonder Danish pianist and composer with the Grammy-winning, worldwide instrumental pop hit “Alley Cat” (#7, AC #2, 1962)
1924 ● Boyd Bennett → Rockabilly singer and songwriter with two Top 40 hits in the early days of rock ‘n’ roll, “Seventeen” (#5, R&B #7, 1955) and “My Boy Flat-Top” (#39, R&B #13, 1955), when his teenage audience began ageing, retired from music in the early 60s and ventured into business ownership, died from a lung ailment on 6/2/2002, age 77
1931 ● Bobby Osborne → With his younger brother, Sonny, one half of the influential bluegrass act The Osborne Brothers, “Rocky Top” (Country #33, 1967), the song was voted the official state song of Tennessee and one of two official state songs the brothers recorded, the other being “My Old Kentucky Home” (Country #69, 1970)
1942 ● Harry Chapin → Folk-pop singer, songwriter and guitarist, composed many narrative-based “story songs” including “Taxi” (#24, CAN #5, 1972) and “Cat’s In The Cradle” (#1, CAN #3, 1974), died in a car collision on the Long Island Expressway on 7/16/1981, age 38
1949 ● Tom Waits → Grammy-winning gravelly, growling blues-rock singer and songwriter, film actor, film score composer, voice-over contributor, wrote “Ol’ 55′” for the Eagles (1974)
1954 ● Mike Nolan → Vocals in Brit mixed-gender euro-pop/disco Bucks Fizz, “Making Your Mind Up” (UK #1, 1981) and 12 other UK Top 40 singles
1954 ● Thunderstick (Barry Purkis) → Brit drummer briefly with early Iron Maiden and later with the cult band Samson, known for wearing various horror masks and performing in a cage, named by Classic Rock magazine as number 36 on the “50 Greatest Drummers of Rock” list
1958 ● Timothy Butler → Bassist and co-founder of Brit New Wave post-punk The Psychedelic Furs, “Pretty In Pink” (#41, 1981)
1961 ● Robert Downes → Guitarist in New Wave synth-pop-soul Then Jerico, “The Motive” (UK #18, 1987)
1963 ● Barbara Weathers → Lead vocals for 80s urban contemporary soul Atlantic Starr, “Always” (#1, 1987)
1963 ● Huw Chadbourne → Keyboardist for Brit lounge/melodramatic pop group Babybird, “You’re Gorgeous” (UK #3, 1996)
1965 ● Brian Futter → Guitarist for Brit indie rock/shoegazing band Catherine Wheel, “Black Metallic” (Modern Rock #9, 1991)
1973 ● Dodi Ma (Damien Rice) → Multi-instrumentalist Irish indie folk-rock singer and songwriter, fronted folk-pop Juniper, then solo, “Cannonball” (UK #19, 2004)
1974 ● Nicole Appleton → Canadian singer in Brit dance-pop-rock all-girl quartet All Saints, “Never Ever” (#4, 1998), then dance-pop sister duo Appleton, “Never Ever” (UK #2, 2003)
1977 ● Dominic Howard → Drummer for prog-glam-electronic rock Muse, “Uprising” (#37, 2009)
1979 ● Sara Beth Bareilles → Grammy-nominated contemporary pop-rock pianist, guitarist and singer/songwriter, “Love Song” (#4, 2007)
1986 ● Jonathan Benjamin “J.B.” Gill → Vocals in Brit R&B/soul-pop boy band JLS (aka Jack The Lad Swing), “She Makes Me Wanna” (Dance/Club #25, 2011), runners-up of the fifth season (2008) of The X Factor
1987 ● Aaron Carter → Teen idol hip hop/pop singer, “Aaron’s Party (Come And Get It)” (#35, 2002)
1988 ● Winston Marshall → Electric guitar, banjo and vocals for Grammy-winning Brit folk-rock Mumford & Sons, “I Will Wait” (#12, Alt Rock #1, 2012)

December 08

1922 ● Jean Ritchie → The “Mother of Folk,” singer, songwriter, dulcimer player, author and Appalachian music heritage stewardess whose influence on the commercial “folk revival” boom of the 60s was immeasurable, recorded nearly three dozen albums and wrote hundreds of original songs based on the traditions of Appalachia, explored the links between American and British folk music, toured extensively until her death from natural causes on 6/1/2015, age 92
1925 ● Jimmy Smith → Jazz organist, Hammond B-3 electronic organ innovator and recognized virtuoso, National Endowment for the Arts (NEA) jazz master, bandleader and composer, “Walk On The Wild Side” (#4, 1962), found dead in his home on 2/8/2005, age 79
1925 ● Sammy Davis, Jr. → Versatile TV and film actor, impersonator, dancer, “Rat Pack” contemporary pop singer and “member” with Frank Sinatra and Dean Martin, solo artist, “Candy Man” (#1, 1972), died of lung cancer on 5/16/1990, age 64
1939 ● James Galway → The “Man with the Golden Flute,” Irish virtuoso flutist, “Annie’s Song” (UK #33, 1978), played with Pink Floyd at the Berlin Wall in 1990
1939 ● Jerry Butler → The “Ice Man,” vocals in Chicago soul/doo wop The Impressions, “It’s All Right” (#4, 1963), then solo, “Only The Strong Survive” (#4, R&B #1, 1969) and 15 other Top 40 hits, now a member of the Chicago/Cook County Board of Commissioners since 1986
1942 ● Bobby Elliot → Drummer in British Invasion pop-rock The Hollies, “Bus Stop” (#5, 1966)
1943 ● James Douglas “Jim” Morrison → Vocals and frontman for influential and controversial rock band The Doors, “Hello, I Love You” (#1, 1968), died from a drug overdose in Paris, France on 7/3/1971, age 27
1944 ● George Baker (Johannes Bouwens) → Dutch singer and frontman for light pop-rock quintet George Baker Selection and two international hits, “Little Green Bag” (#21, 1969) and “Una Paloma Blanca” (#26, AC #1, Country #33, 1975), continued with a mildly successful solo career after disbanding the group in the late 70s
1944 ● Michael Gene “Mike” Botts → Drummer for soft MOR pop-rock Bread, “Make It With You” (#1, 1970) and session musician, died from colon cancer on 12/9/2005, age 61
1946 ● John Graham Knight → Founding member and bassist for Scottish pop-rock The Marmalade, “Reflections Of My Life” (#10, 1970)
1947 ● Geoff Daking → Drummer for early psychedelic rock quintet Blues Magoos, “(We Ain’t Got) Nothin’ Yet” (#5, 1967)
1947 ● Gregory Lenoir Allman → The “Greatest White Blues Singer,” blues-rock vocals, keyboards and songwriter for Southern rock The Allman Brothers Band plus solo, “I’m No Angel” (Mainstream Rock #1, 1987)
1949 ● Ray Shulman → Bass, violin and guitar in pop/rock Simon Dupree & The Big Sound, “Kites” (UK #9, 1967), then founding member of innovative prog rock Gentle Giant
1950 ● Daniel Earl “Dan” Hartman → Multi-instrumentalist member of the Edgar Winter Group, wrote “Free Ride” (#14, 1972), session musician, producer for multiple artists, solo R&B/soul-pop singer and songwriter, “I Can Dream About You” (#6, 1984), died from an AIDS-related brain tumor on 3/22/1994, age 43
1953 ● Colin Gibb (Routh) → Bass and backing vocals for Brit pop/rock novelty-party quartet Black Lace, “Avado” (UK #2, 1984), continues with incarnations of the band in the 00s
1956 ● Warren Cuccurullo → Guitarist in New Wave pop-rock Duran Duran, “Hungry Like The Wolf” (#3, 1982) and Missing Persons, “Walking In L.A.” (Mainstream Rock #12, 1983)
1957 ● Phil Collen → Lead guitar for hard rock/Brit New Wave of Heavy Metal (“NWOBHM”) band Def Leppard, “Love Bites” (#1, 1988)
1959 ● Paul Rutherford → Backing vocals, keyboards and dancer for Brit New Wave pop/rock Frankie Goes To Hollywood, “Relax” (#10, 1984)
1962 ● Marty Friedman → Lead guitarist for trash metal Megadeth, “Trust” (Mainstream Rock #5, 1997)
1966 ● Bushwick Bill (Richard Shaw) → Rapper and vocals for gangsta/horror-rap Geto Boys, “Mind Playing Tricks On Me” (#23, 1991)
1966 ● Sinead O’Connor → Irish-born controversial folk-pop singer and songwriter, “Nothing Compares 2 U” (#1, 1990)
1972 ● Ryan Newell → Backing vocals, lead and slide guitar for Southern folk-rock Sister Hazel, “All For You” (#11, 1997)
1973 ● Corey Todd “8” Taylor → Guitarist and singer for Grammy-winning alt metal/rap-metal Slipknot, “Duality” (Mainstream Rock #5, 2004) and Stone Sour, “Bother” (Mainstream Rock #2, 2002)
1973 ● Judith Anna Pronk → Dutch-born lead vocalist for euro-pop-dance Alice Deejay, “Better Off Alone” (Dance/Club #3, 1999)
1974 ● Nick Zinner → Guitarist for New York alt/art-rock trio Yeah Yeah Yeahs, “Gold Lion” (Alt Rock #14, 2006)
1982 ● Chrisette Michele (Payne) → Contemporary R&B/soul singer and songwriter, “Epiphany” (R&B #14, 2009)
1984 ● Sam Hunt → Country-pop crossover singer and songwriter, co-wrote Kenny Chesney‘s “Come Over” (#23, Country #1, 2012) and followed with his debut album Montevallo (#3, Country #1, 2014) and four Top 40 hits, including “Take Your Time” (#20, Country #1, 2014()

December 09

1932 ● Donald Byrd → Influential jazz and R&B trumpeteer, early mentor to jazz fusion keyboardist Herbie Hancock and session musician known for pioneering soul and funk sounds within bebop jazz, later earned a PhD in music education and taught at Rutgers, Cornell and numerous other American colleges and universities, died on 2/4/2013, age 80
1932 ● Jessie Hill → New Orleans R&B and blues singer with the classic “Ooh Poo Pah Doo – Part II” (#28, R&B #3, 1960), sideman for Professor Longhair and Huey “Piano” Smith, frontman for his own band, The House Rockers, died from kidney and heart failure on 9/17/1996, age 63
1934 ● Junior Wells (Amos Wells Blakemore, Jr.) → Chicago blues harmonica player and singer, “Little By Little” (R&B #23, 1960), worked with Buddy Guy, toured in front of The Rolling Stones in the 70s, issued occasional albums in the 80s and 90s, appeared in the sequel movie Blues Brothers 2000 (1998), died from lymphoma on 1/15/1998, age 63
1935 ● David Houston → Country music star with 29 Country Top 20 hits, including the Grammy-winning crossover “Almost Persuaded” (#24, Country #1, 1966) which spent a record nine straight weeks at the top of Billboard‘s Country Singles chart, a feat unmatched until Taylor Swift‘s “We Are Never Ever Getting Back Together” went to 10 weeks in early 2013, died following a brain aneurysm on 11/30/1993, age 57
1941 ● Dan Hicks → Roots- and folk-rock songwriter and guitarist, original drummer for early San Francisco psych-rock The Charlatans, then founder and frontman for eccentric, acoustic pop (self-defined “folk-swing”) Dan Hicks & His Hot Licks (“How Can I Miss You When You Won’t Go Away,” 1969), disbanded the group in the mid-70s, recorded several solo albums in the 90s and reformed The Hot Licks in 2001, died from liver cancer on 12/6/2016, age 74
1941 ● Sam Strain → Vocals for doo wop/novelty The Chips, “Rubber Biscuit” (1956), then doo wop Little Anthony & The Imperials, “Tears On My Pillow” (#4, 1958) and R&B/Philly soul giants The O’Jays, “Love Train” (#1, 1973), continued to record and perform with all three until retiring in 2004
1943 ● Kenny Vance (Kenneth Rosenberg) → Original member of AM pop-rock vocals for Jay & The Americans, “Cara Mia” (#4, 1965), music supervisor for several films including Animal House (1978) and Eddie And The Cruisers (1983), music director for Saturday Night Live, producer and bandleader
1944 ● Neil Innes → Founding member, guitar and vocals for Brit comedy-rock Bonzo Dog Doo Dah Band, “I’m The Urban Spaceman” (UK #5, 1968)
1944 ● Shirley Brickley → Vocals in mixed gender R&B doo-wop quartet The Orlons, “The Wah-Watusi” (#2, R&B #5, 1962), shot to death by an intruder in her Philadelphia home on 10/13/1977, age 32
1946 ● Dennis Dunaway → Original bassist for hard/glam rock band Alice Cooper, co-wrote “I’m Eighteen” (#21, 1970) and “School’s Out” (#2, 1972), after disbandment in 1974 formed short-lived hard rock Billion Dollar Babies, continues to perform in various rock bands and Alice Cooper reunions into the 10s
1946 ● Walter “Clyde” Orange → Drummer and backing vocals for Grammy-winning Motown R&B/soul-funk Commodores, “Three Times A Lady” (#1, 1978) and “Nightshift” (#3, 1985)
1950 ● Joan Armatrading → St. Kitts-born Grammy-nominated soul-reggae-folk singer, songwriter and guitarist, “Drop The Pilot” (Mainstream Rock #33, 1983)
1954 ● Jack Sonni → Rhythm guitarist for Dire Straits in mid-80s, including “Money For Nothing” (#1, 1985)
1955 ● Randy Murray → Guitarist for latest line-up of Canadian pop-rockers Bachman-Turner Overdrive, “You Ain’t Seen Nothing Yet” (#1, 1974)
1957 ● Donny Osmond → Teenybopper lead vocals and center of sibling pop vocal group The Osmonds, “One Bad Apple” (#1, 1971), then solo, “Soldier Of Love” (#2, 1989), TV actor and host
1957 ● Steve Askew → Former guitarist for one hit wonder New Wave light synth-bubblegum-pop Kajagoogoo, “Too Shy” (#5, 1983), now a stained glass artist
1958 ● Nick Seymour → Bassist for Aussie New Wave pop-rock Crowded House, “Don’t Dream It’s Over” (#2, 1987)
1964 ● Paul H. Landers → Rhythm guitar for heavy metal/Kraut rock Rammstein, “Sehnsucht” (Mainstream Rock #20, 1998)
1966 ● Michael Foster → Drummer for pop-metal FireHouse, “When I Look Into Your Eyes” (#8, 1992) and on albums by FireHouse bandmate and guitarist Bill Leverty
1968 ● Brian Bell → Rhythm guitarist and songwriter for post-grunge alt pop-rock Weezer, “Beverly Hills” (#10, 2005)
1969 ● Jakob Dylan → Singer, songwriter and guitarist for roots rock The Wallflowers, “One Headlight” (Mainstream Rock #1, 1996), solo, son of folk-rock icon Bob Dylan
1970 ● Kara DioGuardi → Grammy-nominated dance-pop and pop-rock songwriter, music video producer, American Idol judge and record company A&R executive, wrote or co-wrote nearly 50 charting singles, including “Ooh Ooh Baby” for Britney Spears
1970 ● Zachary Foley → Original bassist for Brit dance-rock quintet EMF (“Epsom Mad Funkers“), “Unbelievable” (#1, 1990), died of drug overdose on 1/3/2002, age 31
1971 ● Geoff Barrow → Remix producer and co-founder of avant-garde electronica and trip-hop group Portishead, “Sour Times” (#53, 1995)
1972 ● Tre Cool (Frank Edwin Wright III) → Drummer for post-grunge alt rock/punk revival Green Day, “Boulevard Of Broken Dreams” (#2, 2004)
1974 ● Canibus (Germaine Williams) → Jamaican-born rapper and actor, half of the hip hop duo T.H.E.M. (The Heralds of Extreme Metaphors) with Atlanta rapper Webb, left in 1996 for a solo career, including the debut single “Second Round K.O.” (#28, Rap #3, 1998), 13 studio albums and multiple collaborations into the 10s

December 10

1906 ● Harold Adamson → Pop music lyricist known for writing or co-writing dozens of standards, including “Time On My Hands” (1930), “I Couldn’t Sleep A Wink Last Night” (1944) and “An Affair To Remember” (1957) as well as the theme song to the 60s sitcom I Love Lucy, died on 8/17/1980, age 73
1910 ● John Henry Hammond II → Influential Columbia Records executive and A&R scout, responsible for starting or furthering the careers of Billie Holiday, Count Basie, Bob Dylan, Aretha Franklin, Bruce Springsteen, Janis Joplin, Stevie Ray Vaughan and many others, died following a stroke on 7/10/1987, age 76
1924 ● John Kenneth “Ken” Albers → Vocals and trumpet in clean-cut, jazz/collegiate-pop harmony quartet The Four Freshmen (“Graduation Day,” #17, 1956), a major influence on Brain Wilson of The Beach Boys but lost relevance during the British Invasion, died after a long illness on 4/19/2007, age 82
1926 ● Eddie “Guitar Slim” Jones → Flamboyant and oft-covered New Orleans blues guitarist, “The Things That I Used To Do” (R&B #1, 1954), included in the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame’s 500 Songs That Shaped Rock ‘n’ Roll, died penniless from pneumonia on 2/7/1959, age 32
1941 ● Chad Stewart (David Stuart Chadwick) → Vocals and guitar in strings-backed British Invasion light folk-pop duo Chad & Jeremy, “A Summer Song” (#7, 1964)
1941 ● Ralph Vierra Tavares → Vocals in five brother R&B/funk-disco Tavares, “It Only Takes A Minute” (#10, R&B #1, 1976) and nine other R&B Top 10 hits in the mid-70s, left the band to become a municipal court officer in 1984 and occasionally performs with the group into the 10s
1946 ● Christopher John “Ace” Kefford → Bassist and founding member of Brit psych-rock The Move, “Blackberry Way” (UK #1, 1968), solo
1948 ● Jessica Cleaves → Lead singer for pop-rock vocal group The Friends Of Distinction, “Grazing In The Grass” (#3, 1969), backing vocals for Earth, Wind & Fire and Parliament/Funkadelic, died following a stroke on 5/2/2014, age 65
1951 ● Juan Raul David “Johnny” Rodriguez → Latin-American outlaw country singer and songwriter, “Ridin’ My Thumb To Mexico” (#70, Country #1, 1973) and five other Country #1 hits and 23 other Country Top 40 singles
1952 ● Susan Dey → TV and film actress best known for her role as the older singing daughter in the pre-fab TV show sunshine pop group The Partridge Family (“I Think I Love You,” #1, 1970) and as the Assistant D.A. in the drama series L.A. Law (1986-92)
1954 ● Geoff Deane → Vocalist for Brit dance-pop band Modern Romance, “Can You Move” (Dance/Club #2, 1981) and “Best Years Of Our Lives” (UK #4, 1982)
1957 ● Paul Hardcastle → Session keyboard player in the 70s, then solo synth-dance-pop music composer and producer, “19” (#20, Dance #1, 1985), now produces TV soundtracks and remixes for others
1958 ● Helen “Pepsi” DeMacque → Backing vocals for New Wave dance-pop Wham!, “Wake Me Up Before You Go-Go” (#1, 1984), left to form pop duo Pepsi & Shirlie, “Heartache” (#78, Dance #2, 1987)
1965 ● Joseph Donald “J” Mascis → Singer, songwriter and lead guitar for influential indie/cult rock Dinosaur Jr., “Start Choppin'” (Modern Rock #3, 1993)
1966 ● Timothy Christian Riley → Drummer for R&B/new jack swing soul-funk Tony! Toni! Tone!, “If I Had No Loot” (#7, 1993)
1972 ● Brian Molko → Scottish-American singer, songwriter and guitarist for alt glam-rock/punk revival Placebo, “Pure Morning” (Mainstream Rock #40, 1999)
1972 ● Scot Alexander → Bassist for melodic hard rock Dishwalla, “Counting Blue Cars” (#15, 1996)
1974 ● Meg White → Drummer with husband Jack in alt rock duo The White Stripes, “Seven Nation Army” (Mainstream Rock #12, 2004)

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This Week’s Birthdays (November 13 – 19)

Happy Birthday this week to:

November 13

1940 ● Carol Connors (Annette Kleinbard) → Original member of short-lived, one hit wonder pop vocal trio The Teddy Bears (“To Know Him Is To Love Him,” #1, 1958) with Phil Spector, co-wrote “Hey Little Cobra” for the Rip Chords (#4, 1964) and earned an Academy Award for co-writing “Gonna Fly Now” (#1, 1977), the theme song from the film Rocky (1977)
1940 ● Justine “Baby” Washington → R&B/sultry soul vocalist with sixteen R&B hits in four decades through the early 80s, including her biggest, the crossover “That’s How Heartaches Are Made” (#40, R&B #10, 1963), continued to perform into the 10s on cruises and oldies specials
1941 ● Odia Coates → R&B/soul singer known for several light pop duet recordings in the 70s with crooner Paul Anka, including (“You’re) Having My Baby” (#1, 1974), died from breast cancer on 5/19/1991, age 49
1942 ● John P. Hammond → Grammy-winning, underappreciated white blues-folk guitarist, songwriter, producer
1944 ● Timmy ThomasOne hit wonder R&B/soul singer, songwriter and keyboardist, “Why Can’t We Live Together” (#3, 1973), record producer
1946 ● Ray Wylie Hubbard → Texas Hill Country folk and blues singer, songwriter and guitarist, wrote “Up Against The Wall Redneck Mother” but had little commercial success with 15 studio albums, currently hosts a music radio program featuring Americana artists and is considered an elder statesman of Texas music
1947 ● Toy Tallmadge Caldwell → Founding member, chief songwriter and lead guitarist for Southern rock pioneers The Marshall Tucker Band, “Heard It In A Love Song” (#14, 1977), fronted Toy Caldwell Band, died from respiratory failure on 2/25/1993, age 45
1949 ● Roger Steen → Guitarist for camp-rock pop-rock satirists The Tubes, “She’s A Beauty” (#10, 1978)
1949 ● Terry Reid → British hard rock guitarist, bandleader, supporting act, session player and sideman
1951 ● Bill Gibson → Percussion for pop-rock bar band Huey Lewis & The News, “The Power Of Love” (#1, 1985)
1953 ● Andrew Ranken → Drummer for Irish folk-punk-rock The Pogues, “Tuesday Morning” (Rock #11, 1993)
1956 ● Aldo Nova (Aldo Caporuscio) → Canadian pop-rock guitarist, vocalist and producer, “Fantasy” (#23, Mainstream Rock #3, 1982), wrote or co-wrote and produced songs by multiple artists, including the title track to Celine Dion‘s album, A New Day Has Come (#1, CAN #1, UK #1, 2002)
1960 ● Wayne Parker → Bassist for Canadian pop-rock Glass Tiger, “Don’t Forget Me (When I’m Gone)” (#2, 1986)
1964 ● “Dirty” Walter A. Kibby II → Vocals and trumpet for alt rock ska-punk-funk fusion Fishbone, “Sunless Saturday” (Modern Rock #7, 1991)
1979 ● Nikolai Fraiture → Bassist for early 00s garage rock revival The Strokes, “Juicebox” (Modern Rock #9, 2005)
1980 ● Monique Coleman → Pop singer and actress, played “Taylor” in High School Musical movies (most watched cable TV movies ever)

November 14

1900 ● Aaron Copland → Award-winning and influential composer, teacher, writer, critic and conductor known for his “populist” compositions archetypical of the sound of American music, wrote chamber music, vocal works, opera and film scores, including “Fanfare For The Common Man” and “Hoedown” in the 1940s, both of which were interpreted by prog-rock Emerson, Lake & Palmer in the 1970s, died from Alzheimer’s disease and respiratory failure on 12/2/1990, age 89
1915 ● Martha Tilton → Top-level swing and traditional pop vocalist with 24 Top 40 hits with Benny Goodman in the late 30s and another nine as a solo artist in the 40s, including “And The Angels Sing,” (#1, 1939), survived the onslaught of rock ‘n’ roll by acting in movies (The Benny Goodman Story, 1955) and making appearances on radio and TV variety shows, died on 12/8/2006, age 91
1936 ● Freddie Garrity → Eccentric frontman and vocalist for British Invasion novelty/comedy pop-rock ‘n’ roll Freddie & The Dreamers, “I’m Telling You Now” (#1, 1965), appeared in children’s TV shows, died from pulmonary hypertension on 5/19/2006, age 69
1937 ● Joe Billingslea, Jr. → Founder and lead singer for early Motown R&B/soul quartet The Contours, “Do You Love Me” (#3, R&B #1, 1962), left Motown and the band in 1964 to work in an auto plant and later a career in law enforcement, reformed the band in the 70s and still tours as The Contours in the 10s
1938 ● Cornell Gunter → Founding member of R&B/doo wop The Platters, “The Great Pretender” (#1, 1956), left the group in 1954 to join The Flairs and The Coasters (“Yakety Yak,” #1, 1959), enjoyed a mildly successful solo career in the 60s and a resurgence in the late 80s before being murdered in his car in Las Vegas by an unknown assassin on 2/26/1990, age 51
1944 ● Scherrie Payne → Lead singer for R&B/soul The Glass House, “Crumbs Off The Table” (#59, R&B #7, 1969), replaced Diana Ross and Jean Terrell in The Supremes in 1973, “You’re My Driving Wheel” (#85, Dance/Club #5, 1977), still performs with other former Supremes, younger sister of soul singer Freda Payne
1947 ● Stanley “Buckwheat” Dural → Grammy-winning frontman and accordionist for contemporary zydeco band Buckwheat Zydeco (“I Need Your Lovin’,” 1983) mixing Louisiana Creole culture with R&B and rock, toured with Eric Clapton, Robert Plant, Willie Nelson, Paul Simon and others, died from lung cancer on 9/24/2016, age 68
1949 ● James “J.Y.” Young → Guitarist for prototypical arena rock band Styx, “Too Much Time On My Hands” (#9, 1981)
1951 ● Alec Jon Such → Bassist for pop-metal superstars Bon Jovi, “Living On A Prayer” (#1, 1987), dismissed in 1994 and owned a motorcycle shop in New York City in the 00s
1951 ● Frankie Banali → Drummer and manager for heavy metal/pop-metal Quiet Riot, “Bang Your Head (Metal Health)” (#31, 1983)
1951 ● Stephen Bishop → Pop-rock singer, songwriter and guitarist, “On And On” (#11, 1976) and the theme song from the film Tootsie (1977)
1954 ● Yanni (Yiannis Chryssomalis) → Grammy-winning New Age composer and pianist with seven Top 40 albums, including Live At The Acropolis (#5, 1994)
1964 ● Andrew Banfield → Vocals in Brit R&B/neo-soul-funk The Pasadenas, “Tribute (Right On)” (Dance/Club #27, UK #5, 1988)
1964 ● Joseph “Run” Simmons → Founding member and vocalist in premier hardcore rap group Run-D.M.C., “Walk This Way” (#4, 1986), now an ordained and practicing Pentecostal minister under the name Reverend Run
1964 ● Nic Dalton → Bassist for post-punk rock then teen-pop Lemonheads, “Into Your Arms” (Modern Rock #1, 1993)
1965 ● Stuart Stapels → Vocals and guitar for Brit folk-pop-soul Tindersticks, “Bathtime” (UK #38, 1997)
1968 ● Brian Yale → Bassist for post-grunge alt rock Matchbox Twenty, “Bent” (#1, 2000)
1972 ● Douglas Payne → Bassist for Scottish trad rock Travis, “Why Does It Always Rain On Me” (#36, UK #10, 2000) plus 11 other UK Top 40 hits
1974 ● Adina Howard → One hit wonder urban contemporary R&B/soul-pop singer, “Freak Like Me” (#2, 1995)
1974 ● Brendon Benson → Multi-instrumentalist singer and songwriter with six solo albums, a number of production credits and a member of power pop The Raconteurs (“Steady, As She Goes,” #54, Alt Rock #1, 2006)
1975 ● Faye Louise Tozer → Vocals and dance routines for pre-fab Brit dance-pop group The Steps, “5, 6, 7, 8” (UK #14, 1997), film and theater actress
1975 ● Travis Barker → Drummer for pop-punk Blink-182, “All The Small Things” (#6, 2000)
1982 ● Joy Elizabeth Williams → Contemporary Christian singer and songwriter with an eponymous debut album at age 17 and eight others by 2009, recorded and performed with John Paul White as four-time Grammy winning folk-pop duo The Civil Wars (“Barton Hollow,” #101, AAA #15, 2011), resumed a solo career in 2014

November 15

1905 ● Mantovani (Annunzio Paolo Mantovani) → Italian composer, light-orchestra conductor and hugely popular easy listening star (“Around The World,” #12, 1957) with 25 albums in the U.S. Top 40 (six simultaneously in 1959), known for his signature cascading strings music structure and mastery of stereo recording techniques, became the most successful British album artist before The Beatles, continued to compose music until his death on 3/30/1980
1928 ● C. W. McCall (William D. Fries, Jr.) → Advertising executive turned one hit wonder outlaw country singer and lyricist during the 70s truck driving/CB radio craze, “Convoy” (#1, 1976)
1929 ● Joe Hinton → Journeyman gospel singer with several Memphis vocal groups, then one hit wonder deep R&B/soul balladeer with Willie Nelson‘s “Funny (How Time Slips Away)” (#13, 1964), died from skin cancer at the peak of his career on 8/13/1968, age 38
1932 ● Clyde McPhatter → Founder and frontman for influential R&B doo wop The Drifters, “Honey Love” (R&B #1, 1954), left in 1956 for solo career, “A Lover’s Question” (#6, R&B #1, 1958) plus six other Top 40 and 11 other R&B Top 20 hits, died after a heart attack on 6/13/1972, age 39
1932 ● Petula Clark → Hugely popular 50s Brit film actress then Grammy-winning pop singer, “Downtown” (#1, 1965), the first US #1 single by a British female singer, plus 14 other Top 40 hits
1937 ● William Edward “Little Willie” John → Influential but little known R&B/soul singer and songwriter with 17 charting hits, including “Fever” (#24, R&B #1, 1956) and “Talk To Me, Talk To Me” (#20, R&B #5, 1958), convicted of manslaughter and sentenced to prison for stabbing another man in 1966, died in Washington State Penitentiary from a heart attack on 5/26/1968, age 30
1941 ● Jim Dickinson → Rock and blues musician, singer, record producer and frontman, started in the mid-60s as a session musician for The Rolling Stones (piano on “Wild Horses”), Ry Cooder and others, as a member of backing band The Dixie Flyers worked for Hank Ballard, Aretha Franklin, Dion and more, went solo in the mid-70s and began producing records for others, died following triple-bypass heart surgery on 8/15/2009, age 67
1941 ● Rick Kemp → Bassist for Brit electric folk-rock revival band Steeleye Span, “All Around My Hat” (UK #5, 1975)
1945 ● Anni-frid “Frida” Lyngstad Andersson → Vocals for internationally successful Scandinavian pop group ABBA, “Dancing Queen” (#1, 1976)
1949 ● Steve Fossen → Founding member and bassist for hard rock Heart, “Magic Man” (#9, 1976), left in 1982 and in 1988 co-founded Canadian power ballad rock Alias, “More Than Words Can Say” (#2, 1990)
1952 ● Michael Cooper → Singer and guitarist for R&B/soul-funk group Con Funk Shun, “Ffun” (#23, 1978)
1953 ● Alexander O’Neal → R&B/smooth soul singer, started with dance-funk The Time, “Get It Up” (R&B #6, 1981), left for solo career, “Fake” (#25, R&B #1, 1987)
1954 ● Tony Thompson → Drummer for top disco/funk band Chic, “Le Freak” (#1, 1978), session work for Madonna, Mick Jagger, David Bowie and others, drummer for the reunited Led Zeppelin in 1985-86, died from renal cell cancer on 11/12/2003, age 49
1955 ● Joe Leeway → Percussion for New Wave synth-pop Thompson Twins, “Hold Me Now” (#3, 1983)
1960 ● Keith Washington → Grammy-nominated R&B/smooth soul one hit wonder balladeer, “Kissing You” (#40, R&B/Hip Hop #1, 1991)
1968 ● Ol’ Dirty Bastard (Russell Tyrone Jones) → Founding member and bad boy of influential East Coast rap group Wu-Tang Clan, “C.R.E.A.M.” (Hot Rap #8, 1994), collapsed and died during a studio recording session on 11/13/2004, age 35
1974 ● Chad Kroeger (Turton) → Lead guitar and vocals for Canadian post-grunge hard rock Nickelback, “How You Remind Me” (#1, 2001)
1988 ● B.o.B. (Bobby Ray Simmons, Jr.) → R&B/alt Dirty South hip hop singer and songwriter, “Nothin’ On You” (#1, 2010) and two other Top 10 hits in debut

November 16

1901 ● Jesse Stone → Songwriter and key figure in the development of rock ‘n’ roll and R&B music in the 50s, wrote or co-wrote several rock ‘n’ roll standards, including “Shake Rattle And Roll” (1954), “Flip Flop And Fly” (1955) and “Don’t Let Go” (1958), died from natural causes on 4/1/1999, age 97
1873 ● William Christopher “W.C.” Handy → Highly-influential cornetist, bandleader, songwriter, teacher and music publisher known as the “Father of the Blues,” credited with mainstreaming rural Southern roots music to its contemporary form, published hundreds of new and re-written songs, including the widely popular “The St. Louis Blues” (1914), led a variety of groups from string quartets to minstrels to brass bands, died from bronchial pneumonia on 3/28/1958, age 85
1916 ● Herb Abramson → Atlantic Records co-founder and co-owner, president of subsidiary Atco Records, A-1 Studios owner and chief executive, died on 11/9/1999, age 82
1931 ● Bob Gibson → 50s folk singer, songwriter, guitarist and banjoist whose influence on 60s folk revivalists Joan Baez, Harry Chapin, Peter, Paul & Mary and others exceed his success as a recording artist, his career was cut short by drug and alcohol problems, died from progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP) on 9/28/1996, age 64
1931 ● Hubert Sumlin → Celebrated electric blues guitarist, singer and songwriter, best known for his multi-decade collaborations with Howlin’ Wolf, inspiration to Keith Richards (The Rolling Stones), Robbie Robertson (The Band), Jimmy Page (Led Zeppelin) and others, #43 on Rolling Stone magazine’s 100 Greatest Guitarist of All-Time list, died on 12/4/2011 of heart failure
1933 ● Garnett Mimms → R&B/gospel-soul singer and bandleader, “Cry Baby” (#4, R&B #1 1963) and three other Top 30 hits, left the industry by 1980, became a born-again Christian and ordained minister focused on helping lost souls in prisons
1938 ● Toni Brown → Co-founder, vocals and pianist for hippy folk-rock Joy of Cooking, “Brownsville” (#66, 1981), solo
1938 ● Troy Seals → Country-pop singer, songwriter, guitarist and session musician, brother of Jim (Seals & Crofts, “Summer Breeze,” #6, 1972) and Dan (England Dan & John Ford Coley, “I’d Really Love To See You Tonight,” #2, 1976)
1940 ● John Ryanes → Second bass singer for one hit wonder R&B/doo wop sextet The Monotones, “(Who Wrote) The Book Of Love” (#5, 1958), died 5/30/1972, age 31
1941 ● Dan Penn → Blue-eyed soul singer, songwriter and producer known more for his creations for others than his own recordings, including “I’m Your Puppet” for James & Bobby Purify (#6, 1966), “The Dark End Of The Street” for James Carr (#77, R&B #10, 1966), “The Letter” (#1, 1967) and “Cry Like A Baby” (#2, 1968) for The Box Tops and other artists connected withFAME Studios in Muscle Shoals, Alabama
1943 ● Winfred “Blue” Lovett → Founding member and bass vocals in R&B/doo wop then sweet soul quintet The Manhattans, “Kiss And Say Goodbye” (#1, 1976), remained with versions of the group until his death on 12/9/2014, age 71
1945 ● Mabon Lewis “Teenie” Hodges → Memphis soul session guitarist and songwriter, worked at Hi Records in the 70s and recorded with multiple acts, best known for working with Al Greenn and co-writing “Take Me To The River” (#117 on Rolling Stone magazine’s Top 500 Songs of All Time list) and “Love And Happiness” (#98 on the list), died from emphysema on 6/22/2014, age 68
1948 ● Chi Coltrane → Teen prodigy pianist and one hit wonder blue-eyed soul, funk and jazz-pop singer with great promise and expectations but a lone charting single, “Thunder And Lightning” (#17, 1972)
1949 ● Patti Santos → Lead vocals for San Francisco psych-folk-rock It’s A Beautiful Day, “White Bird” (1969), died in a car accident on 12/14/1989, age 40
1958 ● Harry Rushakoff → Drummer with post-punk alt rock Concrete Blonde, “Joey” (Modern Rock #1, 1990)
1962 ● Mani (Gary Mounfield) → Bassist for Brit guitar pop-rock The Stone Roses, “One Love” (Alt Rock #9, 1990), then jangle pop/dance fusion Primal Scream, “Movin’ On Up” (Modern Rock #2, 1992)
1964 ● Diana Krall → Two-time Grammy-winning Canadian jazz-pop singer, songwriter and pianist, “Jingle Bells” (Adult Contemporary #5, 2005), the best-selling female jazz artist of the 90s and 00s, married to Elvis Costello
1966 ● Christian “Flake” Lorenz → Keyboardist for heavy metal/Kraut rock Rammstein, “Sehnsucht” (Mainstream Rock #20, 1998)
1966 ● Dave Kushner → Rhythm guitar for punk-metal Wasted Youth and hard rock supergroup Velvet Revolver, “Slither” (#56, Mainstream Rock #1, 2004), sessions, solo, film and TV scores
1969 ● Byran Abrams → Vocals in a cappella hip hop harmony group Color Me Badd, “I Wanna Sex You Up” (#2, 1991)
1974 ● Eric Judy → Founding member, bassist and backing vocalist for alt rock Modest Mouse (Lampshades On Fire,” Alt #1, Rock #12, CAN #40), left in 2012 to join indie rock Ugly Casanova
1979 ● Trevor Penick → Vocals for pre-fab teen idol boy-band O-Town, “All Or Nothing” (#3, 2001)

November 17

1937 ● Gerry McGee → Lead guitar for pioneering and venerable rock ‘n’ roll instrumental combo The Ventures, “Walk – Don’t Run” (#2, 1960)
1937 ● Peter Cook → Writer, satirist, stage and film actor, modern British comedian, collaborator with Dudley Moore in the comedy duo Derek & Clive, “Goodbye-ee” (UK #18, 1965), host of UK TV music show Revolver, died from intestinal bleeding caused by alcoholism on 1/9/1995, age 57
1938 ● Gordon Lightfoot → Canadian folk-pop singer, songwriter and guitarist, “Sundown” (#1, 1974) and “The Wreck Of The Edmund Fitzgerald” (#2, 1976)
1942 ● Bob Gaudio → Co-founder, co-songwriter and lead singer in early rock ‘n’ roll The Royal Teens, “Short Shorts” (#3, 1958), co-founder, constant member, songwriter and producer of Top 40 pop vocal quartet The Four Seasons, “Big Girls Don’t Cry” (#1, 1962), producer and songwriter for many others, co-producer (with Frankie Valli) of the Tony-winning Broadway show Jersey Boys (2005)
1944 ● Harold Eugene “Gene” Clark → Early country-rock singer and songwriter with The New Christy Minstrels, seminal folk-country-rock The Byrds, “Mr. Tambourine Man” (#1, 1965), Dillard & Clark, co-wrote “Eight Miles High” (Top 20, 1966), died of a heart attack on 5/24/1991, age 46
1946 ● Martin Barre → Founding member and guitarist for long-lived Brit folk-rock Jethro Tull, “Living In The Past” (#11, 1973)
1947 ● Robert “Stewkey” Antoni → Vocals for psych-rock/garage rock The Nazz, “Hello It’s Me” (#66, 1970) and hard rock Fuse (with Rick Nielsen, Tom Petersson and Bun E. Carlos of the future Cheap Trick)
1947 ● Rod Clements → Folk-rock bassist for Lindisfarne, “Lady Eleanor” (, 1971) and Jack The Lad, session work and solo albums
1948 ● Iain Sutherland → Vocals, guitars and keyboards for folk-rock sibling duo The Sutherland Brothers, “(I Don’t Want To Love You But) You Got Me Anyway” (#48, 1973), then joined with an obscure rock band to form The Sutherland Brothers & Quiver, “The Arms Of Mary” (#81, UK #5, 1975)
1951 ● Dean Paul “Dino” Martin, Jr. → Actor and singer, son of trad pop/MOR singer Dean Martin, member of the Hollywood-pedigree, teenage bubblegum pop trio Dino, Desi & Billy with Desi Arnaz Jr. and classmate Billy Hinsche, “”I’m A Fool” (#17, 1965), officer with the California Air National Guard, died when his CANG F-4 Phantom crashed in the mountains northeast of Los Angeles on 3/21/1987, age 35
1955 ● Peter Cox → New Wave synth-pop duo Go West, “King Of Wishful Thinking” (#8, 1990), now with Manfred Mann’s Earth Band
1957 ● Jim Babjak → Founding member and lead guitarist for alt pop-rock The Smithereens, “Only A Memory” (Mainstream Rock #1, 1988), songwriter with multiple film and TV credits
1960 ● RuPaul (RuPaul Andre Charles) → Cross-dressing drag queen, dance-pop singer and songwriter, “Back To My Roots” (Dance #1, 1993), TV and radio host
1966 ● Jeffrey Scott “Jeff” Buckley → Alt folk-rock singer, songwriter and guitarist, “Last Goodbye” (Modern Rock #19, 1995), son of folk singer Tim Buckley, drowned in a Memphis river during a fully-clothed, spontaneous swim on 5/29/1997, age 30
1967 ● Ben Wilson → Keyboardist for blues-rock jam band Blues Traveler, “Run-Around” (#8, 1995)
1967 ● Ronald Boyd “Ronnie” DeVoe Jr. → Vocals for R&B/teen pop then hip hop/new jack swing vocal quartet New Edition, “If It Isn’t Love” (#7, 1988), then Bell Biv Devoe, “Poison” (#3, 1990)
1972 ● Kimya Dawson → Singer, songwriter and acoustic guitarist, has several solo albums and co-fronted the anti-folk duo Moldy Peaches, “Anyone Else But You” (2007) was featured in the hit film Juno
1980 ● Clarke Isaac Hanson → Guitar, vocals and keyboards for teen pop-rock brother trio Hanson, “MMMBop” (Worldwide #1, 1997)
1981 ● Sarah Nicole Harding (Hardman) → Singer in pre-fab all-girl Euro-pop vocal group Girls Aloud, “Sound Of The Underground” (UK #1, 2002)

November 18

1909 ● John Herndon “Johnny” Mercer → Popular music lyricist, composer, singer and pianist, wrote or co-wrote over 1,500 songs, many of which are pop standards, won Grammy Awards for “Moon River” (1961) and “Days Of Wine And Roses,” died from an inoperable brain tumor on 6/25/1976, age 66
1922 ● Albert Dvorin → Music promoter and talent agent, planned and managed Elvis Presley‘s tours for 22 years from the mid-50s and coined the phrase “Elvis has left the building,,” died in a car accident returning from an Elvis impersonator performance on 8/22/2004, age 81
1926 ● Dorothy Collins (Marjorie Chandler) → Canadian-American girl-next-door pre-rock ‘n’ roll traditional pop singer and TV entertainer, scored several minor hits in the 50s (“My Boy – Flat Top,” #16, 1955), featured vocalist on 50s top music variety show Your Hit Parade and spokeswoman for sponsor The American Tobacco Co., left to co-host TV’s immortal Candid Camera and perform in theater and on Broadway, died from asthma(!) and heart disease on 7/21/1994, age 67
1927 ● Hank Ballard (John Henry Kendricks) → Vocals and frontman for R&B doo wop The Midnighters, raunchy proto-rock ‘n’ roll “Work With Me, Annie” (banned/no charts, 1954), solo, “Finger Poppin’ Time” (R&B #2, 1960), co-wrote “The Twist” for Chubby Checker (#1, 1960), died from throat cancer on 3/2/2003, age 75
1936 ● Don Cherry → Innovative “free” jazz cornetist and trumpeter, father of alternative singer Eagle-Eye and stepfather of hip hop dance-pop Neneh, died on 10/19/1995, age 58
1941 ● Conleth “Con” Cluskey → Guitarist for Irish pop-rock trio The Bachelors, “Diane” (#10, UK #1, 1964)
1945 ● Mark Weitz → Keyboards for 60s psych-pop-rock Strawberry Alarm Clock, “Incense And Peppermints” (#1, 1967)
1947 ● Mike Carbello → Congas and percussion for Latin-rock Santana, “Black Magic Woman” (#4, 1970), session work on over two dozen albums for The Rolling Stones, Steve Miller, Jimi Hendrix, Bonnie Raitt, Eric Clapton and many others
1949 ● Herman “Ze German” Rarebell (Erbel) → Drummer for German hard rock/metal Scorpions, “Rock You Like A Hurricane” (#25, 1984)
1950 ● Graham Parker → Author, singer, songwriter, guitarist, frontman for Brit pub-rock The Rumour and solo, “Wake Up (Next To You)” (#39, Mainstream Rock #19, 1985)
1950 ● Rudy Sarzo → Cuban-American bassist for heavy metal/pop-metal Quiet Riot, “Bang Your Head (Metal Health)” (#31, 1983)
1954 ● Charles Williams → Keyboardist for R&B/soul-funk-disco KC & The Sunshine Band, “That’s The Way (I Like It)” (#1, 1975) and five other #1 hits
1954 ● John Parr → One hit wonder pop-rock singer, songwriter and guitarist, “St. Elmo’s Fire (Man In Motion)” (#1, 1985)
1958 ● Laura Lynch → Founding member, bassist, co-lead singer and occasional songwriter for country-rock girl group Dixie Chicks, pushed out of the band in 1996 prior to their rise to stardom, “Not Ready To Make Nice” (#4, 2006), now sells real estate in Texas
1958 ● Michael Ramos → Keyboards for roots rock The BoDeans, “Closer To Free” (#16, 1993)
1960 ● Kim Wilde (Smith) → New Wave synth-pop singer, “You Keep Me Hangin’ On” (#1, 1987) plus 20 other Top 50 UK singles, author, Brit TV host and professional landscape gardener
1961 ● Janice Kuehnemund → Founding member, lead guitar and vocals for critically-panned but huge selling 80s all-female glam metal quartet Vixen, “Cryin'” (#22, 1989)
1962 ● Jeff Ward → Journeyman drummer in the Chicago industrial music scene, including a brief stint with Nine Inch Nails (1990-1991) as their tour drummer and gigs with Ministry, Skafish and others, died by suicide brought on by heroin addiction on 3/19/1993, age 30
1962 ● Kirk Hammett → Lead guitar and vocals for heavy metal Metallica, “Enter Sandman” (#10, 1991), #11 on Rolling Stone magazine’s 100 Greatest Guitarists of All Time
1969 ● Duncan Sheik → Alternative pop-rock singer and songwriter, “Barely Breathing” (#16, 1997), Grammy-winning stage and film score composer
1972 ● Matt Knight → Bassist and vocals for alt pub rock/white soul Toploader, covered “Dancing In The Moonlight” (UK Top 10, 2000)
1975 ● Anthony David “Ant” McPartlin → Actor, singer and one half the pop music duo PJ & Duncan (later renamed Ant & Dec), “Lets Get Ready To Rhumble” (UK #9, 1994), TV host
1977 ● Fabolous (John David Jackson) → East coast rapper, “Can’t Let You Go” (#4, 2003)
1984 ● Johnny Christ (Joanthan Lewis Seward) → Starting in 2003, bass guitar and backing vocals for pop/metal Avenged Sevenfold, “Bat Country” (#60, Mainstream Rock #2, 2005)

November 19

1905 ● Tommy Dorsey → Noted Swing Era bandleader, trombonist and songwriter, “Tea For Two” (#7, 1958), brother of jazz reed player Jimmy Dorsey
1927 ● Joe Hunter → R&B pianist for Hank Ballard & The Midnighters (“Let’s Go, Let’s Go, Let’s Go,” #6, R&B #1, 1960), then early 60s in Motown house band The Funk Brothers, which provided nearly all instrumentation behind every Motown hit, left in 1963 to become a freelance session player and arranger, died in Detroit on 2/2/2007
1927 ● The Singing Postman (Allan Smethurst) → Brit folk singer and actual postal service employee who hummed tunes while delivering the mail and eventually released several novelty-pop albums and the hit “Hev Yew Gotta Loight, Boy,” which won the Novello Award in 1966 for best novelty song, died penniless in a Salvation Army hostel on 12/24/2000, age 73
1936 ● Ray Collins → Founding member and vocals in L.A. blue-eyed soul The Soul Giants, recruited Frank Zappa as guitarist who transformed the band into satirical rock group The Mothers Of Invention, “Brown Shoes Don’t Make It” (1967) and eventually Zappa’s backing band, left in 1968 and became a taxi driver and drifter until his death following a heart attack on 12/24/2012, age 73
1936 ● Robert Willie White → Session guitarist in Motown house band The Funk Brothers, played the guitar riff in The Temptations‘ classic “My Girl” (#1, 1965) and performed on multiple other Motown hits, died from complications following open heart surgery on 10/27/1994
1937 ● Geoff Goddard → Songwriter and session keyboardist, wrote “Johnny Remember Me” for John Leyton (UK #1, 1961) and dozens of other 60s rock ‘n’ roll tunes, played on Brit instrumental rock ‘n’ roll The Tornados‘ “Telstar” (#1, 1962), the first major US hit by a British group, retired from the music industry in the mid-60s, died on 5/15/2000
1938 ● Hank Medress → Vocals in white R&B/doo wop The Tokens, “The Lion Sleeps Tonight” (#1, 1961), producer for Tony Orlando & Dawn, Melissa Manchester, Dan Hill, Rick Springfield and others, record label executive with EMI Canada and Bottom Line Records, died from lung cancer on 6/25/2007, age 68
1939 ● Warren “Pete” Moore → Bass vocalist for R&B/soul-pop The Miracles, co-wrote “Going To A Go-Go” (#11, 1965)
1943 ● Fred Lipsius → Piano and saxophone for jazz-rock/pop-rock fusion band Blood, Sweat & Tears, “Spinning Wheel” (#2, 1969)
1946 ● Joe Correro, Jr. → Drummer for hard-edged rock ‘n roll Paul Revere & The Raiders, “Just Like Me” (#11, 1965) plus 14 other US Top 30 hit singles
1952 ● Bill Sharpe → Founding member and keyboardist for Brit jazz fusion Shakatak, “Night Birds” (UK #9, 1982)
1952 ● Eddie Rayner → Keyboards for New Wave pop-rock Split Enz, “I Got You” (#53, UK #12, 1980), producer and music director for New Zealand Idol
1954 ● Annette Guest → Vocals in Philly R&B/disco female group First Choice, “The Player, Part 1” (R&B #7, 1974)
1960 ● Matt Sorum → Anglo-Norwegian hard rock drummer and percussion, toured with The Cult, joined hard rock Guns N’ Roses in 1989, “November Rain” (#3, 1992), then co-founded hard rock supergroup Velvet Revolver, “Fall To Pieces” (Mainstream Rock #1, 2004)
1965 ● Jason “J Spaceman” Pierce → Leader of Brit psych-space-rock bands Spacemen 3, “Revolution” (UK Ind. #1, 1989) and Spiritualized, “Lazer Guided Melodies” (UK #27, 1992), solo
1965 ● Pete “Sonic Boom” Kember → Founding member, guitar and organ for Brit psych-space-rock Spacemen 3, “Revolution” (UK Ind. #1, 1989)
1969 ● Travis McNabb → Drummer and percussionist with alt pop-rock Better Than Ezra, “Good” (#30, Modern Rock #1, 1995), since 2007 in backing band for country-pop duo Sugarland, “All I Want To Do” (#18, Country #1, 2008)
1971 ● Justin Chancellor → Bassist for prog-metal bands Peach and Grammy-winning Tool, “Vicarious” (Modern Rock #2, 2006)
1971 ● Tony Rich (Antonion Jeffries) → Grammy-winning contemporary R&B singer, songwriter and guitarist, “Nobody Knows” (#2, 1996)

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This Week’s Birthdays (November 6 – 12)

Happy Birthday this week to:

November 06

1814 ● Antoine-Joseph “Adolphe” Sax → Belgian musician and instrument designer, invented the saxophone in 1846, died in poverty from natural causes on 2/4/1894, age 79
1916 ● Ray Conniff → Grammy-winning composer and instrumental pop-easy listening bandleader, “Somewhere My Love (Lara’s Theme)” (#9, 1966), died in a slip-and-fall bathtub accident on 10/12/2002, age 85
1932 ● Stonewall Jackson → Country singer and musician with 22 Country Top 20 hits from 1958 to 1971 and four crossover country-pop singles, including “Waterloo” (#4, Country #1, 1959), successfully sued The Grand Old Opry in Nashville for age discrimination and performed there through the 00s
1933 ● Joseph Pope → With brother Charles and others, vocals for R&B/soul The Tams, “What Kind Of Fool (Do You Think I Am)” (#9, 1963) and “There Ain’t Nothing Like Shaggin'” (UK #21, 1987), died on 3/16/1996, age 62
1937 ● Eugene Pitt → Founding member of R&B/doo wop vocal quintet The Jive Five, “My True Story” (#3, 1961)
1938 ● Jim Pike → Vocalist in close-harmony folk-pop trio The Lettermen, “When I Fall In Love” (#1, 1961) and 15 other Top 10 hits
1938 ● P.J. Proby (James Marcus Smith) → Texas-born rock ‘n’ roll singer and songwriter with a more success in England than at home, “Hold Me” (#70, UK #3, 1964), cabaret actor
1941 ● Doug Sahm → Tex-Mex rock ‘n roll and country-rock bandleader for The Sir Douglas Quintet, “She’s About A Mover” (#13, 1965), also played with The Texas Tornados and Los Super Seven, died from a heart attack on 11/18/1999, age 58
1941 ● Guy Clark → Grammy-winning Texas “outlaw” country and folk-rock guitarist and songwriter, wrote “L.A. Freeway” (Jerry Jeff Walker, #98, 1973) and “Desperados Waiting For A Train” (The Highwaymen, Country #15, 1985) plus dozens of songs for other artists, including Johnny Cash, Alan Jackson and Emmylou Harris, issued over 30 charting albums and won a 2014 Grammy Award for My Favorite Picture Of You (2013), died after a long illness concurrent with lymphoma on 5/17/2016, age 74
1947 ● George Young → Scottish rhythm guitarist in Aussie-based 60s pop-rock The Easybeats, “Friday On My Mind” (#16, 1967), producer for AC/DC and older brother of Angus and Malcolm Young
1948 ● Glenn Frey → Grammy-winning guitarist, singer and songwriter, member of Linda Ronstadt‘s backing band, which became country rock/L.A. rock Eagles, “One Of These Nights” (#1, 1975), solo, “You Belong To The City” (#2, 1985), TV and film actor, died from complications of rheumatoid arthritis, colitis and pneumonia following intestinal surgery on 1/18/2016, age 67
1948 ● Rushton Moreve (John Rushton Morey) → Early bassist for Canadian-American hard rock, proto-metal Steppenwolf, co-wrote “Magic Carpet Ride” (#3, 1968), left the band in 1968, died in a car accident on 7/1/1981, age 32
1950 ● Chris Glen → Scottish bassist in The Sensational Alex Harvey Band, “Delilah” (UK #7, 1975) and The Michael Schenker Group, solo
1961 ● Craig Goldie → Heavy metal guitarist in Rough Cutt, Giuffria (“Call To The Heart, ##15, 1984) and Dio (“Rainbow In The Dark,” (Mainstream Rock #14, 1983)
1963 ● Paul Brindley → Bassist for Brit alt-indie-rock The Sundays, “Here’s Where The Story Ends” (Modern Rock #1, 1990)
1964 ● Corey Glover → Lead singer for prog-funk-metal Living Colour, “Cult Of Personality” (#13, 1988), solo, actor
1964 ● Greg Graffin, Ph.D. → Co-founder, lead singer, songwriter and only constant member of L.A. punk rock Bad Religion, “Infected” (Mainstream Rock #33, 1995), received his doctorate from Cornell University and has lectured in life sciences and paleontology
1966 ● Paul Gilbert → Guitarist for pop-metal “shredder” band Mr. Big, “To Be With You” (#1, 1992)

November 07

1922 ● Al Hirt → Nicknamed “Jumbo” and “The Round Mound of Sound,” portly New Orleans-based Dixieland jazz and pop virtuoso trumpeter and bandleader with the Grammy-winning “Java” (#4, 1964), wrote the theme song to the TV crime show The Green Hornet, died of liver failure on 4/27/1999, age 76
1938 ● Delectus “Dee” Clark → Falsetto R&B/soul vocalist, “Raindrops” (#2, 1961) and five other Top 40 hits, died of a heart attack on 12/7/1990, age 52
1942 ● Johnny Rivers (John Henry Ramistella) → Early rock ‘n’ roll singer, songwriter and guitarist, “Secret Agent Man” (#3, 1966) and 15 other Top 40 hits, founded Soul City Records and produced The 5th Dimension (“Wedding Bell Blues,” #1, 1969), continues to perform in the 00s
1943 ● Dino Valenti (Chester W. Powers, Jr.) → Vocals and songwriter for psychedelic folk-rock Quicksilver Messenger Service, “Fresh Air” (#49, 1970), solo, wrote “Get Together” for The Youngbloods (#5, 1969), died on 11/16/1994, age 51
1943 ● Joni Mitchell (Roberta Joan Anderson) → Canadian pop-rock-jazz-fusion singer, songwriter and guitarist, “Help Me” (#7, 1974), wrote “Both Sides Now” for Judy Collins (#8, 1968) and “Woodstock” for Crosby, Stills, Nash & Young (#11, 1970)
1951 ● Kevin Scott MacMichael → Canadian guitarist and songwriter for New Wave pop-rock Cutting Crew, “(I Just) Died In Your Arms Tonight” (#1, 1987), died of lung cancer on 12/31/2002, age 51
1954 ● Robin Beck → Pop-rock vocalist, sang the Coca-Cola jingle “The First Time” (UK #1, 1988), back-up singer for Melissa Manchester, Leo Sayer and others
1957 ● Jellybean (John Benitez) → Puerto Rican drummer, guitarist, producer (Madonna, Michael Jackson, the Pointer Sisters and others), club DJ and remixer, solo artist, “Who Found Who?” (#16, Dance/Club #3, 1987)
1960 ● Tommy Thayer → Guitarist, songwriter and producer, worked with Kiss as a session player and back-up on tours and is now the lead guitarist and “Spaceman” character for the group
1963 ● Clint Mansell → Guitarist for dance-rock Pop Will Eat Itself, “X, Y & Zee” (Modern Rock #11, 1991)
1964 ● Liam O Maonlai → Co-founder, vocals and keyboards for Irish rockers Hothouse Flowers, “Don’t Go” (Modern Rock #7, 1988)
1967 ● Sharleen Spiteri → Vocals for Scottish blues-rock Texas, “In My Heart” (Alt Rock #14, 1991)
1970 ● Neil Hannon → Founder, singer and frontman for Irish orchestral-pop group The Divine Comedy, “National Express” (UK #8, 1999)
1971 ● Robin Finck → Lead guitarist for industrial rock Nine Inch Nails, “The Day The World Went Away” (#17, 1999), joined reincarnated hard rock Guns N’ Roses in 1998 as a side project
1978 ● Mark Daniel Read → Vocals for Brit-Norwegian pop-rock boy band A1, “Same Old Brand New You” (, 2000)
1983 ● Forrest Kline → Lead singer, chief songwriter and guitarist in emo-rock/power pop Hellogoodbye, “Here (In Your Arms)” (#14, 2006)
1988 ● Tinie Tempah (Patrick Chukwuemake Okogwu) → Brit rapper, singer, songwriter and record producer with multiple UK Top 10 hits as a lead solo or guest artist, including “Written In The Stars” (#12, UK #1, 2010)
1996 ● Lorde (Ella Yelich-O’Connor) → New Zealand pop singer with the debut, world-wide hit single “Royals” (#1, AUS #2, UK #1, 2013), the first New Zealander with a #1 hit in the US

November 08

1913 ● Arnold “Gatemouth” Moore → Booming-voiced ordained minister, gospel and Chicago blues singer and songwriter, wrote “Did You Ever Love A Women?” for B. B. King and “Somebody’s Got To Go” for Rufus Thomas, died of natural causes on 5/19/2004, age 90
1927 ● Ken Dodd → Brit music hall traditional stand-up comedian, songwriter and adult pop singer, “Tears” (UK #1, 1965) and 18 other UK Top 40 hits, TV and film actor
1927 ● Patti Page (Clara Ann Fowler) → Grammy-winning traditional adult pop singer, “(How Much Is) That Doggie In The Window?” (#1, 1953) and 13 other Top 40 hits, the best-selling female artist of the 50s, died from heart and lung failure on 1/1/2013, age 85
1929 ● Bertrand Russell “Bert” Berns → Pioneer and prolific rock ‘n’ roll songwriter and producer, wrote or co-wrote “Twist And Shout”, “Hang On Sloopy”, “Here Comes The Night” and many others, co-founded Bang! Records, died from a heart attack on 12/31/1967, age 38
1942 ● Johnny Perez → Original member and percussion for roots/psych-rock The Sir Douglas Quintet, “She’s About A Mover” (#13, UK #15, 1965), later owned Topanga Skyline Studios, died from cirrhosis of the liver on 9/11/2012, age 69
1944 ● Bonnie Bramlett (Bonnie Lynn O’Farrell) → Blue-eyed soul and blues-rock singer, first Caucasian in Ike and Tina Turner‘s backing vocal group The Ikettes, one half of the husband-and-wife duo Delaney & Bonnie, “Never Ending Song Of Love” (#13, 1971), solo, TV actress
1944 ● Jack Jones → Drummer for underappreciated and little known (except in Germany) Britbeat/power pop The Creation, “Painter Man” (UK #36, GER #8, 1967)
1944 ● Robert Nix → Original drummer and songwriter for Southern rock Atlanta Rhythm Section, “Imaginary Lover” (#7, 1978)
1944 ● Rodney Slater → Founding member and sax player for Brit comedy-rock Bonzo Dog Doo Dah Band, “I’m The Urban Spaceman” (UK #5, 1968)
1945 ● Donald Murray → Founding member and drummer for pop-rock The Turtles, “Happy Together” (#1, 1967), died from complications from ulcer surgery on 3/22/1996, age 50
1946 ● John “The Big Figure” Martin → Founding member and first drummer for Brit pub-rock Dr. Feelgood, “Milk And Alcohol” (UK #9, 1979)
1946 ● John Farrar → Guitarist for instrumental pop-rock The Shadows, “Apache” (Worldwide #1, 1960), then backing musician, songwriter and producer for Olivia Newton-John, wrote or co-wrote several of her hits, including “You’re The One That I Want” (#1, 1978)
1946 ● Roy Wood → Co-founder, guitar and vocals for Brit psych-rock The Move, “Blackberry Way” (UK #1, 1968) and Electric Light Orchestra, “Telephone Line” (#7, 1977)
1947 ● Minnie Riperton → Sweet chirping pop singer and songwriter, “Loving You” (#1, 1974), died of cancer on 7/12/1979, age 31
1949 ● Alan Berger → Bassist for New Jersey rock ‘n roll bar band Southside Johnny & The Asbury Jukes, “Talk To Me” (1978)
1949 ● Bonnie Raitt → Eight-time Grammy-winning roots and blues-rock singer, songwriter and slide guitarist, “Something To Talk About” (#5, 1991)
1949 ● Lee Freeman → Rhythm guitar, vocals and songwriting for 60s psych-pop-rock Strawberry Alarm Clock, “Incense And Peppermints” (#1, 1967), died from cancer on 2/14/2010, age 60
1951 ● Gerald Alston → Joined R&B/doo wop then sweet soul quintet The Manhattans (“Kiss And Say Goodbye,” #1, 1976) in 1970 on lead vocals to replace the deceased George Smith, left for a solo career from 1988 to 1995 (“Slow Motion,” R&B #3, 1990), rejoined and continues into the 10s
1954 ● Rickie Lee Jones → Jazz, R&B/soul and pop-rock singer and songwriter “Chuck E’s In Love” (#4, 1979)
1957 ● Porl Thompson → Guitar, saxophone and keyboards for post-punk art-glam-goth rock The Cure, “Friday I’m In Love” (Modern Rock #1, 1992)
1958 ● Terry Lee Miall → Drummer for post-punk/New Wave pop-rock Adam And The Ants, “Goody Two-Shoes” (#12, 1982)
1961 ● Leif Garrett (Leif Per Nervik) → Pop-rock teen idol singer, “I Was Made For Dancin'” (#10, 1978), film and TV actor
1964 ● Cubie Burke → Briefly joined his five siblings in the “First Family of Soul,” Chicago R&B/soul The Five Stairsteps (“O-o-h Child,” #7, R&B #14, 1970) but left to become a professional dancer with Alvin Ailey and other troupes, died from a brain injury on 5/14/2014, age 49
1969 ● Jimmy Chaney → Drummer for alt rock/funk-metal Jimmie’s Chicken Shack, “Do Right” (Modern Rock #12, 1999)
1970 ● Diana King → Jamaican-born reggae dancehall singer and songwriter, “Shy Guy” (#13, 1994)
1970 ● Gareth “Rat” Pring → Guitarist for indie punk-rock Ned’s Atomic Dustbin, “Not Sleeping Around” (Modern Rock #1, 1992)
1971 ● Tech N9ne (Aaron Dontez Yates) → Hardcore rapper known for his dynamic rhymes schemes and speed rapping, released over a dozen official albums including The Gates Mixed Plate (#13, 2010), co-founder of Strange Music record label
1977 ● Tiffani Wood → Singer in pre-fab Aussie all-girl pop vocal quintet Bardot, “Poison” (Aus. #1, 2000)
1985 ● Jack Osbourne → Record label talent scout, TV actor, star of The Osbournes and Adrenaline Junkie, son of Ozzy Osbourne

November 09

1936 ● Mary Allin Travers → Perhaps the most important female figure in the folk-revival movement and anti-war protest songs of the 60s, vocals and guitar for seminal folk trio Peter, Paul & Mary “Blowin’ In The Wind” (#2, AC #1, 1963), died from complications of leukemia on 9/16/2009, age 72
1937 ● Roger McGough → Poet, lyricist and vocalist in comedy-pop The Scaffold, “Lily The Pink” (UK #1, 1968) and “Thank U Very Much” (#69, UK #4, 1968), BBC Radio host and voice-overs for commercials
1941 ● John Dean → Bass vocals for blue-eyed soul/doo wop The Reflections (“(Just Like) Romeo And Juliet,” #6, 1964), continues to perform with the group into the 10s
1941 ● Tom Fogerty → Rhythm guitar in the shadow of his brother and band frontman John Fogerty in roots rock/”swamp” rock Creedence Clearwater Revival (“Down On The Corner,” #3, 1969), left in 1971 for a middling solo career, contracted AIDS from blood transfusions during back surgery and died several years later on 9/6/1990, age 48
1943 ● Lee Graziano → Drums for one hit wonder pop-rock American Breed, “Bend Me Shape Me” (Top 10, 1968)
1944 ● Phil May (Philip Arthur Dennis Kattner) → Vocals for raunchy R&B/blues-rock British Invasion band The Pretty Things, “Don’t Bring Me Down” (UK #10, 1964)
1946 ● Ruben Armand “Benny” Mardones → One hit wonder blue-eyed soul singer, “Into The Night” (# 11, 1980 and #20, 1989), one of only 10 artists to have charted the same song in the Top 20 on two separate occasions
1948 ● Alan Gratzer → Drums and percussion for arena rock REO Speedwagon, “Keep On Lovin’ You” (#1, 1980)
1948 ● Joe Bouchard → Bassist in hard rock/pop metal Blue Öyster Cult, “(Don’t Fear) The Reaper” (#12, 1976)
1949 ● Tommy Caldwell → Founding member and bassist for Southern rock The Marshall Tucker Band, “Heard It In A Love Song” (#14, 1977), died in a car crash on 4/28/1980, age 30
1950 ● Dennis Provisor → Keyboardist, vocals and songwriter for AM Top 40 pop-rockers The Grass Roots, “Midnight Confessions” (#5, 1968), continued to tour into the 00s with the band and with his own The Hits on the oldies circuit
1953 ● Michael J. Mullins → Vocals for Brit dance-pop band Modern Romance, “Can You Move” (Dance/Club #2, 1981) and “Best Years Of Our Lives” (UK #4, 1982)
1954 ● Dennis Stratton → Guitarist for Brit heavy metal Iron Maiden, “Flight Of Icarus” (Mainstream Rock #8, 1983)
1960 ● Demetra Plakas → Drummer for all-girl post-punk/grunge band L7, “Pretend We’re Dead” (Alt Rock #8, 1992)
1962 ● Steve “Silk” Hurley → Club DJ, pioneering Chicago house-music producer, songwriter, and four time Grammy Award-nominee, “Work It Out” (Dance #3, 1989), two time Remixer of the Year (1999 and 2000) and Best Remixed Recording (2002 and 2003),
1969 ● Sandy “Pepa” Denton → Vocals in female hip hop trio Salt-N-Pepa, “Let’s Talk About Sex” (#13, 1991)
1970 ● Scarface (Brad Jordan) → Rapper and songwriter in gangsta/horror-rap trio Geto Boys, “Mind Playing Tricks On Me” (#23, 1991), then Dirty South solo rap career, “Smile” (#12, Rap #2, 1997)
1970 ● Susan Tedeschi → Electric blues and soul guitarist with roots in gospel, singer, songwriter and bandleader with multiple Grammy nominations, frontwoman for the Susan Tedeschi Band and, in collaboration with her husband Derek Trucks, Soul Stew Revival and the Tedeschi Trucks Band, solo with multiple albums, including Back To The River (Blues Albums #1, 2008)
1973 ● Nick Lachey → Lead vocals in adult contemporary/sweet soul boy band 98 Degrees, “Give Me Just One Night (Una Noche)” (#2, 2000)
1974 ● Joe C. (Joseph Callaja) → Diminutive rapper, musician, touring band member and comic sidekick for rapper Kid Rock (“Only God Knows Why,” #19, Mainstream, Rock #5, 1999), died in his sleep from complications of lifelong coeliac disease on 11/16/2000, age 26
1977 ● Sisqó (Mark Andrews) → R&B/urban soul and hip hop bad boy with Dru Hill, “How Deep Is Your Love” (#3, 1998), then solo, “Thong Song” (#3, 2000)
1984 ● Delta Goodrem → Australian TV actress (Nina Tucker in soap opera Neighbours) and pop singer, “Lost Without You” (Adult Contemporary #18, Australia #1, 2005) plus six other Australian #1 singles

November 10

1916 ● Edward William “Billy” May, Jr. → Highly acclaimed Big Band leader, composer, arranger and trumpeter, fronted Billy May & His Orchestra, and charted a version of “Charmine” (#17, 1952), arranged Frank Sinatra‘s acclaimed concept albums Come Fly With Me (1958), Come Dance With Me! (1959) and Come Swing with Me! (1961). wrote the theme songs to TV’s The Green Hornet (1966) , Batman (1967) and The Mod Squad (1968), among others, died of a heart attack on 1/22/2004, age 87
1933 ● Bonny “Mack” Rice → R&B songwriter and singer best known for writing the classic and enduring “Mustang Sally” for himself (R&B #15) and Wilson Pickett (#23, R&B #6, 1966), also co-wrote “Respect Yourself” for The Staple Singers (#12, R&B #2, 19761) and songs covered by many others, died at home in Detroit from complications of Alzheimer’s disease on 6/27/2016, age 82
1939 ● Tommy “Bubba” Facenda → Back-up singer for Gene Vincent in his band, the Blue Caps in the late 50s, left the group and became a one hit wonder rock ‘n’ roll singer with the anthemic “High School U.S.A.” (#28, 1959) and its 40 different versions mentioning different schools by region, later became a firefighter in Virginia, toured with a reunited Blue Caps in the 80s
1940 ● David Edward “Screaming Lord” Sutch → Brit comedy-rock bandleader and solo artist, “Jack The Ripper” (1963), wannabe politician and leader of The Official Monster Raving Loony Party, fought in numerous parliamentary elections without winning, committed suicide on 6/16/1999, age 58
1941 ● Kyu Sakamoto (Hisashi Oshima) → Japanese pop star with the one hit wonder “Sukiyaki” (#1, 1963), the first US #1 by a Japanese artist, died in a commercial airliner crash on 8/12/1985, age 43
1944 ● Tim Rice → Multiple award-winning film, theater and Broadway lyricist and producer, collaborated with Andrew Lloyd Webber on Jesus Christ Superstar (1970) and with Elton John on The Lion King (1994), among many other shows
1945 ● Donna Fargo (Yvonne Vaughn) → Country-pop singer and songwriter, “The Happiest Girl In The Whole U.S.A.” (#11, 1972)
1946 ● Leonard “Chip” Hawkes → Bassist for 60s Britbeat Brian Poole & The Tremeloes, co-wrote “(Call Me) Number One” (#27, UK #2, 1969), moved to Nashville in the 70s to write and record with Waylon Jennings and others, reformed The Tremeloes in 1979, managed his son, pop star Chesney Hawkes and formed his own band in the 90s, continues to tour and perform into the 10s on the European oldies circuit with various retro bands
1947 ● Dave Loggins → Pop-rock one hit wonder singer and songwriter, “Please Come To Boston” (#5, 1974), cousin of Kenny Loggins
1947 ● Glen Buxton → Founder and guitarist for glam-rock/metal Alice Cooper band, co-wrote “School’s Out” (#7, 1972), died of pneumonia on 10/19/1997, age 49
1948 ● Greg Lake → Prog-rock guitarist and songwriter, founding member of prog/space-rock King Crimson, “The Court Of The Crimson King” (#80, 1970), then supergroup Emerson, Lake & Palmer, “Lucky Man” (#48, 1971), solo
1950 ● Bram Tchaikovsky (Peter Bramall) → Guitar and vocals for power pop/rock The Motors, “Airport” (UK #4, 1978), solo, “Girl Of My Dreams” (#37, 1979)
1950 ● Ronnie Hammond → Lead singer for Southern rock Atlanta Rhythm Section, “Imaginary Lover” (#7, 1978), solo, died of a heart attack on 3/14/2011, age 60
1954 ● Mario Cipollina → Bassist for pop-rock bar band Huey Lewis & The News, “The Power Of Love” (#1, 1985)
1959 ● Frank Maudsley → Bassist for bizarrely-teased hair New Wave pop-rock A Flock of Seagulls, “I Ran (So Far Away)” (#9, 1982)
1959 ● Laura MacKenzie Phillips → Film and TV actress, singer and songwriter in The New Mamas & The Papas, daughter of “Papa” John Phillips
1961 ● Norman “Junior” Giscombe → Brit R&B singer and songwriter, “Mama Used To Say” (#30, R&B #2, 1982) and duet with Kim Wilde, “Another Step (Closer To You)” (UK #8, 1987)
1965 ● David Hawes → Bassist for Brit indie rock/shoegazing band Catherine Wheel, “Black Metallic” (Modern Rock #9, 1991)
1966 ● Steve Mackey → Bassist for alt rock/Britpop Pulp, “Common People” (UK #2, 1995)
1967 ● Andrew Vowles → Co-founder and vocals for electro-dance/trip hop progenitor duo Massive Attack, “Unfinished Sympathy” (UK #13, 1991)
1968 ● Steve Brookstein → Blue-eyed soul singer and winner of the first series of UK TV show The X Factor in 2004, “Against All Odds” (UK #1, 2004)
1969 ● Paul “Kermit” Leveridge → Rapper and vocals with alt Brit-pop Black Grape, “England’s Irie” (UK #6, 1996)
1970 ● Derry Brownson → Keyboards and samples for Brit dance-rock quintet EMF (Epsom Mad Funkers), “Unbelievable” (#1, 1990)
1970 ● Warren G (Warren Griffin III) → Hip hop producer and West Coast rapper, “Regulate” (#2, 1994)
1971 ● Big Punisher (Christopher Rios) → Corpulent Latino rapper “Still Not A Player” (#24, Dance/Club #3, 1998), died from obesity-related heart failure on 2/7/2000, age 28
1973 ● Jacqueline Abbott → Lead vocals for alt pop-rock The Beautiful South, “A Little Time” (UK #1, 1990)
1975 ● Jim Adkins → Lead singer and guitarist for alt rock/neo-punk Jimmy Eat World, “The Middle” (#5, Adult Top 40 #2, 2002)
1978 ● Drew McConnell → Bassist for indie psych-rock Babyshambles, “Delivery” (#6, 2007)
1978 ● Eve Jihan Jeffers → Hip hop singer and MC, “Let Me Blow Ya Mind” (#2, 2001)
1979 ● Christopher Joannou → Co-founder and bassist in Aussie alt-grunge-rock Silverchair, “Tomorrow” (Modern Rock #1, 1994)
1983 ● Miranda Lambert → Country-pop singer and songwriter, as a solo artist scored fifteen Country Top 20 hits and several crossover singles, including “The House That Built Me” (#28, Country #1, 2010), performed numerous charting duets with others, including “We Were Us” (#26, Country #1, 2013) with Keith Urban, fronts the girl group Pistol Annies

November 11

1927 ● Mose Allison → Jazz and blues pianist, singer, songwriter and bandleader, his songs have been covered by The Who, John Mayall, Elvis Costello, The Rolling Stones, Van Morrison and others
1929 ● LaVern Baker (Delores Williams) → R&B and jazz-pop singer, “Jim Dandy” (#17, 1956) plus 7 other Top 40 and 12 other R&B Top 10 hits, died from coronary disease on 3/10/1997, age 67
1930 ● Walter Louis “Hank” Garland → Highly-regarded rockabilly, country and jazz studio musician, recorded with Elvis Presley, Roy Orbison, Johnny Cash and others, issued an improbable but well-received jazz album, Jazz Winds From A New Direction (1961), stopped recording following a near fatal 1966 car accident, died from an infection on 12/27/2004, age 74
1936 ● Jack Keller → Composer, songwriter and record producer, wrote or co-wrote several teen pop and pop-rock hits in the 50s and 60s, including “Just Between You And Me” (The Chordettes, #8, 1957) and “Everybody’s Somebody’s Fool” (Connie Francis, #1, 1960), composed TV theme songs for Bewitched, Gidget and other programs, produced The Monkees‘ first album and for artists in Nashville in the 80s, died from leukemia on 4/1/2005, age 68
1936 ● Opal Courtney, Jr. → Vocals for pioneer R&B/doo wop The Spaniels, “Goodnight, Sweetheart, Goodnight” (R&B #5, 1954), died after a heart attack on 9/18/2008, age 71
1938 ● Roger Lavern (Roger Keith Jackson) → Keyboards for Brit instrumental rock ‘n’ roll The Tornados, “Telstar” (#1, 1962), the first major US hit by a British group, died from prostate cancer on 6/15/2013, age 74
1939 ● Albie Galione → Vocals in white R&B/doo wop quartet The Passions, “Gloria” (1958)
1940 ● Dennis Coffey → R&B, soul and funk guitarist, sessionman and solo artist, member of The Funk Brothers, Motownn’s house band which provided nearly all instrumentation behind every Motown hit, first white artist to perform on Soul Train when he played his instrumental “Scorpio” (#6, 1971) in January 1972, issued 14 solo albums from 1969 to 2011 and continues to perform in his hometown of Detroit into the 10s
1941 ● Peter Meaden → The “Mod God,” publicist and manager for numerous rock bands, especially during the Mod subculture period in the 60s U.K., briefly managed The Who and later Captain Beefheart, died from a barbiturate overdose on 7/29/1978. age 36
1943 ● Mac Kissoon (Gerald Farthing) → Vocals with his sister, Katherine Farthing, in one hit wonder easy listening/bubblegum pop duo Mac & Katie Kissoon (“Chirpy Chirpy Cheep Cheep,” #20, 1971), she went on to decades of session backing vocals work while his career stalled as a member of James Last‘s ensemble
1945 ● Chris Dreja → Rhythm guitar and songwriter for blues-rock The Yardbirds, “For Your Love” (#6, 1965)
1945 ● Vince Martell (Vincent Martemucci) → Lead guitar and vocals for psych-rock Vanilla Fudge, “You Keep Me Hangin’ On” (#6, 1968)
1947 ● Pat Daugherty → Bassist for Southern raunch-rock Black Oak Arkansas, “Jim Dandy To The Rescue” (Top 30, 1973)
1950 ● Jim Peterick → Founder, guitarist and lead writer for blue-eyed soul The Ides of March, “Vehicle” (#2, 1970) and Survivor, “Eye Of The Tiger” (#1, 1982)
1952 ● Paul Cowsill → Vocals for family pop band The Cowsills, “The Rain, The Park And Other Things” (#2, 1967) and theme song from Broadway musical Hair, (#2, 1969), inspiration for the TV show The Partridge Family
1953 ● Andy Partridge → Co-founder, guitarist and songwriter for quirky New Wave synth-pop XTC, “Making Plans For Nigel” (UK #17, 1979) and side project for the band under the pseudonym The Dukes Of Stratosphear
1953 ● Marshall Crenshaw → Power pop singer and songwriter, “Someday, Someway” (#36, 1982), movie actor, portrayed John Lennon in the road version of Beatlemania
1956 ● Ian Craig Marsh → Guitarist and founding member of late-70s synth-pop pioneers The Human League, “Don’t You Want Me” (#1, 1981), left to form 80s synth-pop Heaven 17, “Temptation” (UK #2, 1983) and “Contenders” (Dance/Club #6, 1987)
1957 ● Tony “Gad” Robinson → Bass, vocals and 40-year member of long-lived roots reggae Aswad (Arabic for “black”), “Don’t Turn Around” (, 1988), one of the most popular and successful Brit reggae bands
1962 ● Gunnar Mathias “Mic” Michaeli → Keyboardist for Swedish hard rock/glam-metal Europe, “The Final Countdown” (#8, 1986)
1966 ● Peaches (Merrill Beth Nisker) → Canadian electronic groovebox rapper known for her vulgar lyrics, sexual themes and flamboyant stage presence, “Wild Thing” (Dance #4, 2007)
1969 ● Gary Powell → Drummer for indie/punk revival The Libertines, “Can’t Stand Me Now” (UK #2, 2004), played with the New York Dolls on their 2004 reunion tour, then indie rock Dirty Pretty Things, “Bang Bang You’re Dead” (UK #5, 2006)
1973 ● Jason White → Touring guitarist for 12 years in post-grunge alt rock/punk revival Green Day, “Boulevard Of Broken Dreams” (#2, 2004), joined the band as a full member in 2012, also with punk/garage rock, no touring, fun only supergroup Pinhead Gunpowder
1974 ● Static Major (Stephen Garrett) → Grammy-winning R&B singer, rapper, songwriter and record producer, member of the R&B trio Playa, “Cheers 2 U” (#38, 1998), died during a surgical procedure to treat a rare blood disorder on 2/25/2008, age 33

November 12

1906 ● Booker T. Washington “Bukka” White → Delta blues guitarist, singer and performer, “Parchman Farm Blues” (1940), other artists have covered his work, including Bob Dylan, Fixin’ To Die Blues” (1962), died of cancer on 2/26/1977, age 70
1917 ● Jo Elizabeth Stafford → Classical-trained singer who chose traditional, breezy pop and sultry jazz for a career that ran from the 30s to the 80s, “You Belong To Me” (#1, 1952) also the first song by a female artist to reach #1 in the UK, occasional film acting and parody records, died from congestive heart failure on 7/16/2008, age 90
1931 ● Bob Crewe → Producer and songwriter for Top 40 pop vocal quartet The Four Seasons, “Big Girls Don’t Cry” (#1, 1962), also produced hits by Mitch Ryder & The Detroit Wheels, Freddy Cannon, Roberta Flack and his own band, The Bob Crewe Connection, “Music To Watch Girls By” (#15, 1967), injured his brain in a fall and died from its effects four years later on 9/11/2014, age 82
1936 ● Charlotte Davis → Vocals in R&B/doo wop The Tune Weavers, “Happy, Happy Birthday Baby” (#5, 1957)
1936 ● Mort Shuman → Singer, pianist and prolific pop-rock songwriter, often in collaboration with Doc Pomus, wrote or co-wrote “Viva Las Vegas,” “Teenager In Love,” “This Magic Moment” and many others, died from complications following liver surgery on 11/3/1991, age 54
1939 ● Ruby Nash Curtis → Lead singer in R&B/soul vocal group Ruby & The Romantics, “Our Day Will Come” (#1, 1963) and two additional Top 20 hits
1941 ● Jerry Scholl → Vocals in one hit wonder blue-eyed R&B/doo wop quintet The Mello-Kings, “Tonite, Tonite” (#77, 1957)
1943 ● Arthur Paul “Pooch” Tavares → Vocals in five brother R&B/funk-disco Tavares, “Heaven Must Be Missing An Angel” (#15, 1976)
1943 ● Brian Hyland → Pre-Beatles bubblegum-pop teen idol singer, “Sealed With A Kiss” (#3, 1962)
1943 ● Jimmy Hayes → Vocals in a cappella The Persuasions, “Chain Gang” (1971) and “I Really Got It Bad For You” (#56, 1974)
1943 ● John Walker (John J. Maus) → Guitar and vocals in pop-rock trio The Walker Brothers, “Make It Easy On Yourself” (US #16, UK #1, 1965), died from liver cancer on 5/7/2011, age 67
1944 ● Booker T. Jones → Organist and frontman for Stax Records house band Booker T. & The MG’s, “Green Onions” (#3, 1966), solo
1945 ● Neil Young → Grammy-winning, venerable Canadian-born country-folk-rock singer/songwriter, “Heart Of Gold” (#1, 1972) and “Downtown” (Mainstream Rock #6, 1995), member of Crosby, Stills, Nash & Young
1947 ● Buck Dharma (Donald Roeser) → Guitar and vocals for hard rock/pop metal Blue Öyster Cult, wrote “(Don’t Fear) The Reaper” (#12, 1976)
1948 ● Errol Brown → Jamaican vocalist and frontman for Brit interracial R&B/soul-disco Hot Chocolate, “You Sexy Thing” (#3, 1976) and 27 other UK Top 40 hits, including one in every year from 1970 to 1984, died from liver cancer on 5/6/2015, age 66
1952 ● Laurence Juber → Grammy-winning guitarist, played lead for Paul McCartney‘s Wings (1978-81), sessions, solo
1953 ● Malcolm “Calum” Macdonald → Percussion for Scottish Celtic folk-rock Runrig, “An Ubhal As Airde (The Highest Apple)” (UK #18, 1995)
1955 ● Leslie McKeown → Vocals for Scottish teen-pop boy band Bay City Rollers, “Saturday Night” (#1, 1976)
1964 ● David Ellefson → Bassist for hard rock/metal Metallica, then thrash-metal Megadeth, “Symphony Of Destruction” (Mainstream #29, 1992)
1964 ● James Victor “Vic” Chestnutt → Quadriplegic singer, songwriter and guitarist known for his dark, haunting but comic roots rock style and 17 albums, two produced by Michael Stipe of R.E.M., and songs performed by Madonna, the Indigo Girls, Smashing Pumpkins, R.E.M. and others on the charity album Sweet Relief II: The Gravity Of The Situation (1993), died while in a muscle relaxant overdose-induced coma on 12/25/2009, age 45
1968 ● Jo Dunne → Bass guitar in all-girl New Wave pop-punk quartet Fuzzbox (originally We’ve Got A Fuzz Box And We’re Gonna Use It), “International Rescue” (UK #11, 1989)
1976 ● Tevin Campbell → Teenaged hip hop and R&B/soul singer, “Tell Me What You Want Me To Do” (#6, 1991) and four other Top 40 hits between 1990 and 1994
1984 ● Omarion (Omari Ishmael Grandberry) → Vocals for R&B/hip hop urban boy band B2K, “Bump, Bump, Bump” (#1, 2002)

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This Week’s Birthdays (October 30 – November 5)

Happy Birthday this week to:

October 30

1908 ● Patsy Montana (Rubye Rose Bevins) → Country singer, songwriter and occasional actress, the first female country music artist to have a million-selling record (“I Want To Be A Cowboy’s Sweetheart,” 1935), died of cancer on 5/3/1996, age 87
1925 ● Attilio Joseph “Teo” Macero → Jazz musician, composer and record producer who produced three of the best-selling and groundbreaking jazz albums of all time, Dave Brubeck‘s Time Out (1959) and Miles DavisKind Of Blue (1959) and Bitches Brew (1970), also issued several solo albums, played in various jazz ensembles and projects, and produced TV and film soundtracks, including Martin Scorsese‘s The Blues, died in his sleep on 2/19/2008, age 82
1934 ● Ray Smith → One hit wonder rockabilly and teen-pop singer, “Rockin’ Little Angel” (#22, 1960, the biggest hit for little Judd Records, owned by Sun Records‘ owner Sam Phillips‘ brother, Jud), continued to record and perform in the U.S. and Canada without success, committed suicide on 11/29/1979, age 45
1939 ● Eddie Holland → With brother Brian Holland and Lamont Dozier, one third of the Motown songwriting team of Holland-Dozier-Holland, co-wrote dozens of hits for The Supremes, The Four Tops, Marvin Gaye, Martha & The Vandellas, Freda Payne, Chairmen Of The Board and others, producer and solo artist, “Jamie” (#30, R&B #6, 1962)
1939 ● Grace Slick (Grace Barnett Wing) → Singer, songwriter and lead vocals for 60s psych-rock The Great Society, then Jefferson Airplane, “Somebody To Love” (#5, 1967) and 70s/80s arena rock Jefferson Starship, “Nothing’s Gonna Stop Us” (#1, 1987)
1939 ● Norman Richard West, Jr. → Original member in R&B/soul vocal quartet The Soul Children, “I’ll Be The Other Woman” (#36, R&B #3, 1973), the group did not meet the expectations of Isaac Hayes and other Stax Records executives who created the group to offset the loss of departed duo Sam & Dave
1941 ● Otis “Big Daddy” Williams → Co-founder and baritone for The Elgins, which became R&B giants The Temptations, “My Girl” (#1, 1965) and Grammy-winning “Papa Was A Rolling Stone” (#1, 1972), still performs with the group as the only original member
1945 ● Henry Winkler → Emmy-winning stage and TV actor, film director and producer, played the character Arthur “The Fonz” Fonzarelli on retro-50s sitcom Happy Days in the 70s
1946 ● Chris Slade (Christopher Rees) → Welsh drummer for Manfred Mann’s Earth Band, “Blinded By The Light” (#1, 1977), also played or toured with Gary Moore, The Firm, AC/DC, Uriah Heep and others
1947 ● Timothy B. Schmit → Folk then country-rock bassist, first with Poco, left in 1977 to join Eagles, “New Kid In Town” (#1, 1977), sessions and solo, “Boys Night Out” (#25, 1987)
1949 ● David Green → Bassist in Aussie light pop-rock Air Supply, “The One That You Love” (#1, 1981)
1960 ● Byron Burke → Vocals in R&B/house urban-dance Ten City, “Right Back To You” (Dance #1, 1989)
1960 ● Joey Belladonna (Joseph Belladini) → Lead singer for speed/thrash metal Anthrax, “Only” (Mainstream #26, 1993), solo
1962 ● Geoff Beauchamp → Guitarist in Brit pop-rock Eighth Wonder, “Cross My Heart” (Dance/Club #10, 1988)
1963 ● Jerry DeBorg → Guitarist in techno-electronic pop-dance Jesus Jones, “Right Here, Right Now” (#2, 1991)
1965 ● Gavin Rossdale → Lead singer and rhythm guitar for alt-rock Bush, “Glycerine” (Mainstream #4, 1995) and Institute, “Bullet-Proof Skin” (Mainstream Rock #26, 2005), solo, married to Gwen Stefani
1969 ● Snow (Darrin O’Brien) → Juno Award-winning Canadian reggae-rapper, “The Informer” (#1, 1993)
1970 ● Tommy Walter → Co-founder, bassist and songwriter for indie rock Eels, “Novocaine For The Soul” (Modern Rock #1, 1997), then founded alt-rock Abandoned Pools, “The Remedy” (Modern Rock #27, 2002)
1973 ● Maurizio Lobina → Keyboards for Italian dance-pop trio Eiffel 65, “Blue (Da Ba Dee)” (#6, 1999)
1976 ● Kassidy Lorraine Osborn → Vocals in country-pop sister trio SHeDAISY, “I Will…But” (#43, Country #2, 1999)
1989 ● Vanessa White → Vocals in electro-pop girl-group The Saturdays, “Missing You” (UK #3, 2010)

October 31

1912 ● Dale Evans (Lucille Wood Smith) → “Queen of the Cowgirls” and beloved country-and-western entertainer with her third husband, singing cowboy Roy Rogers, wrote the signature song “Happy Trails To You” and co-starred in 28 films with her husband and on the popular 50s TV series The Roy Rogers Show, died from congestive heart failure on 2/7/2001, age 88
1926 ● Sir Jimmy Savile → Radio DJ, dance hall manager, music impresario, actor, TV host, first (1964) and last (2006) host of BBC’s Top of the Pops program, died from pneumonia on 10/29/2011, age 84
1927 ● Anita Kerr → Country-pop and easy listening vocalist, composer and bandleader, fronted Grammy-winning The Anita Kerr Singers and contributed to country music’s pop-oriented “Nashville Sound” in the 60s by providing backing vocals on scores of albums by top artists, collaborated with Rod McKuen on mood-music albums in the 60s, wrote and produced film soundtracks in the 80s
1937 ● Tom Paxton → Greenwich Village folk singer and songwriter, “The Last Thing On My Mind” (1964) and the children’s song “Goin’ To The Zoo” (1964), still touring and recording in the 10s
1939 ● Ali Ibrahim “Farka” Touré → The “African John Lee Hooker,” talented and renowned Malian singer, multi-instrumentalist and world music recording artist with dozens of albums in several languages, blended African rhythmic and musical traditions that evoke the origins North American blues, ranked #76 on Rolling Stone magazine’s “100 Greatest Guitarists of All Time,” died from bone cancer of 3/7/2006, age 66
1940 ● Eric Griffiths → Guitarist in the original lineup of skiffle/rock ‘n’ roll band The Quarrymen, precursor to The Beatles, left in 1958 to join the Merchant Navy, died from pancreatic cancer on 1/29/2005, age 64
1945 ● Rik Kenton → Bassist in Brian Ferry-led art/glam/prog rock Roxy Music (“Virginia Plan,” UK #4, 1972) in the early 70s, left for a brief solo career then founded 80s mixed race, reggae-pop-rock Savage Progress (“My Soul Unwraps Tonight,” 1984)
1945 ● Russ Ballard → Guitarist and songwriter in hard/art rock Argent, wrote “God Gave Rock And Roll To You” (1973), solo career and songwriter for other artists, including Three Dog Night‘s “Liar” (#7, 1971) and Hot Chocolate‘s “So You Win Again” (#31, 1977)
1952 ● Bernard Edwards → Bassist, co-founder, co-writer and producer for top R&B/disco band Chic, “Le Freak” (#1, 1978), produced albums for ABC, Power Station, Robert Palmer, Rod Stewart and others, died from pneumonia after an all-star “tribute” show in Japan on 4/18/1996, age 43
1952 ● Tony Bowers → Bassist for Brit blues-rock Blind Eye, punk rock Alberto Y Lost Trios Paranoias, and soul-pop Simply Red, “Holding Back The Years” (#1, 1986)
1961 ● Larry Mullen. Jr. → Drummer for Irish mega-star rockers U2, “With Or Without You” (#1, 1987)
1963 ● Johnny Marr (John Martin Maher) → Guitarist and songwriter for definitive Brit indie rock The Smiths, “Heaven Knows I’m Miserable Now” (UK #10, 1984), post-punk supergroup Electronic, “Getting Away With It” (Dance/Club #7, 1990), The The, Modest Mouse and The Cribs
1963 ● Mikkey Dee (Micael Kiriakos Delaoglou) → Drummer and songwriter in theatrical rock King Diamond, left in 1992 to join punk-metal Motörhead, “Born To Raise Hell” (UK #47, 1994)
1964 ● Colm O’Ciosoig → Drummer for art-prog-rock, “shoe-gazing” pioneers My Bloody Valentine, “Only Shallow” (Modern Rock #27, 1992)
1965 ● Annabella Lwin (Myint Myint Aye) → Vocals in New Wave Afro-Euro-synth-pop Bow Wow Wow, “I Want Candy” (#22, 1982)
1966 ● Ad-Rock (Adam Horovitz) → Guitarist and rapper in hardcore punk then blue-eyed hip hop the Beastie Boys, “Fight For Your Right” (#7, 1987)
1967 ● Adam Schlesinger → Guitarist, songwriter and vocalist in power pop band Fountains Of Wayne, “Stacy’s Mom” (#21, 2003)
1968 ● Al Mackenzie → Multi-instrumentalist in techno-dance-pop D:Ream, “U R The Best Thing” (Dance #1, 1993)
1968 ● Alistair McErlaine → Guitarist in Scottish blues-rock Texas, “In My Heart” (Alt Rock #14, 1991)
1968 ● Vanilla Ice (Robert Matthew Van Winkle) → Blue-eyed rapper, “Ice Ice Baby” (first hip hop single to hit #1, 1990)
1970 ● Malin “Linn” Berggren → Vocals in Swedish pop-rockers Ace Of Base, “All That She Wants” (#2, 1993)
1980 ● Charles Moniz → Canadian drummer for hardcore punk rock Grade, later bassist for Avril Lavigne band
1981 ● Frank Anthony Iero, Jr. → Rhythm guitarist and vocalist in 00s alt rock/emo band My Chemical Romance, “Welcome To The Black Parade” (#9, 2006), vocals for Leathermouth
1982 ● Gabriela Irimia → Romanian singer with her twin sister Monica in one hit wonder dance-pop duo The Cheeky Girls, “Cheeky Song (Touch My Bum)” (UK #2, 2002)
1982 ● Monica Irimia → Romanian singer with her twin sister Gabriella in one hit wonder dance-pop duo The Cheeky Girls, “Cheeky Song (Touch My Bum)” (UK #2, 2002)

November 01

1903 ● Don Robey → Record label owner, producer and songwriter whose influence over the development of R&B/pop was immeasurable, launched or managed the careers of Bobby “Blue” Bland, Big Mama Thornton, the Dixie Hummingbirds, Memphis Slim, Little Junior Parker and many others through his Peacock and Duke labels (the first African-American to own a successful record label), sold to ABC/Dunhill in 1973 and died of a heart attack on 6/16/1975, age 71
1936 ● Zephire Andre Williams → The “Father of Rap,” R&B, blues and rock ‘n roll musician whose talking-style vocals were an early precursor of hip hop/rap music (“Bacon Fat,” R&B # 9, 1957 and “Cadillac Jack,” R&B #46, 1968), co-wrote “Shake A Tail Feather” covered by The Five Du-Tones, James & Bobby Purify (#25, 1967) and Ike & Tina Turner, continued to record and perform into the 10s
1937 ● “Whisperin'” Bill Anderson → Prolific and respected country music singer/songwriter, TV personality and Sirius XM radio host with 29 Country Top 10 hits from 1960 to 1979 and seven crossover country-pop singles, including “Still” (#8, Country #1, 1963), over 400 of his songs have been recorded and released by other artists
1940 ● Staff Sgt. Barry Sadler → Vietnam veteran and one hit wonder pop star, “The Ballad Of The Green Berets” (#1, 1966), fell into a coma after being shot in an attempted robbery and died a year later on 11/5/1989, age 49
1944 ● Mike Burney → Saxophonist for eccentric jazz-pop Wizzard, “See My Baby Jive” (UK #1, 1973)
1944 ● Richard S. “Kinky” Freidman → The “Jewish Cowboy,” irreverent country-rock satirist, singer, songwriter and bandleader, The Texas Jewboys, novelist, journalist and would-be politician
1946 ● Rick Grech (Richard Roman Grechko) → Bassist for blues/art rock Family, “In My Own Time” (UK #4, 1971), supertrio Blind Faith (US #1 album Blind Faith, 1969), Traffic, Ginger Baker’s Air Force, died from alcohol-related kidney failure on 3/17/1990, age 43
1949 ● David Foster → Canadian producer, composer, musician, arranger for dozens of top MOR/easy listening artists and recordings, including The Bee Gees, Michael Bublé, Clay Aiken, Céline Dion, Barbra Streisand, Kenny Rogers, Faith Hill and many others
1950 ● Dan Peek → Multi-instrumental singer and songwriter for folk-pop America, wrote “Lonely People” (#5, 1974), later moved to Contemporary Christian pop music, died in his sleep on 7/24/2011, age 60
1951 ● Ronald Bell (Khalis Bayyan) → Founding member, saxophonist, songwriter and singer for jazz-fusion then R&B/funk Kool & The Gang, “Jungle Boogie” (#4, 1973)
1954 ● Chris Morris → Guitarist for pop-rock one hit wonder Paper Lace, “The Night Chicago Died” (#1, UK #3, 1974), a second single “Billy, Don’t Be A Hero” (#96, UK #1, 1974) qualifies them as a two hit wonder in the UK
1957 ● Lyle Lovett → Witty country-pop singer/songwriter, “Give Me Back My Heart” (Country #13, 1987), three-time Grammy Award winner, former husband of actress Julia Roberts
1959 ● Eddie Macdonald → Bassist for post-punk anthem rockers The Alarm, “Sold Me Down The River” (Mainstream #2, 1989)
1962 ● Anthony Kiedis → Vocals for funk-rock Red Hot Chili Peppers, “Californication” (Modern Rock #1, 2000)
1962 ● Mags Furuholmen → Guitar and keyboards for Norwegian synth-pop A-ha, “Take On Me” (#1, 1985)
1963 ● Rick Allen → Drummer for hard rock/metal Def Leppard, “Love Bites” (#1, 1988), lost his left arm in an auto accident in England in 1984 but continued with custom-constructed acoustic and electronic drumkits
1966 ● Willie D (William Dennis) → Vocals in controversial gangsta/horror-rap Geto Boys, “Mind Playing Tricks On Me” (#23, 1991), solo, “Dear God” (Rap #4, 2002)
1967 ● Sophie B. Hawkins → Eclectic rock, pop, jazz, R&B and African music singer and songwriter, “As I Lay Me Down” (#6, 1995)
1969 ● Darren Partington → Keyboards and percussion for electronic/acid-house band 808 State, “Pacific State” (UK #10, 1989)
1975 ● Harold Elwin “Bo” Bice, Jr. → Husky-voiced American Idol runner-up, pop/rock singer, songwriter and guitarist, “Inside Your Heaven” (#2, 2005)
1981 ● LaTavia Roberson → Backing vocals in Grammy-winning R&B/dance-pop Destiny’s Child, “Say My Name” (#1, 2000), stage actress

November 02

1929 ● Amar G. Bose → MIT graduate student, audio engineer and classical music lover, visionary engineer, inventor and billionaire entrepreneur whose namesake company, the Bose Corporation, is synonymous with top-quality audio systems and residential and automotive speakers, his company introduced the revolutionary 901 Series of home speaker systems, the Bose Wave radio, “sound docks” and noise-cancelling headphones, died from undisclosed causes on 7/12/2013, age 83
1931 ● Phil Woods → Four-time Grammy-winning alto saxophonist, in touring bands for Dizzy Gillespie and Benny Goodman in the 50s, fronted his own bands in the 60s, then session work for Billy Joel (alto sax solo on “Just The Way You Are”), Steely Dan (“Doctor Wu”), Paul Simon (“Have A Good Time”) and others, continued to record and perform until just before his death from emphysema on 9/29/2015, age 83
1937 ● Earl “Speedo” Carroll → Singer and frontman for R&B/doo wop The Cadillacs, “Speedo” (#17, R&B #3, 1955), left in 1963 to join The Coasters and performed with the group through the 80s, now on the oldies circuit
1938 ● Jay Black (David Blatt) → Lead vocals and de facto frontman for clean-cut, pop-rock vocal group Jay & The Americans, “Cara Mia” (#4, 1965)
1941 ● Bruce Welch → Guitarist with instrumental pop-rock The Shadows, “Apache” (Worldwide #1, 1960)
1944 ● Keith Emerson → Influential and accomplished progressive rock keyboardist, first with 60s Brit prog rock The Nice (“America,” 1968) then as founding member of prog rock supergroup Emerson Lake & Palmer (“Lucky Man,” #48, 1971), and later as a moderately successful solo artist and in Emerson, Lake & Powell and short-lived 3, issued a final studio album, The Three Fates Project in 2012 and was about to launch a tour of Japan when he died from a self-inflicted gunshot wound to the head on 3/10/2016, age 71
1945 ● John David “J.D.” Souther → Country-rock singer and songwriter, session musician and producer for Linda Ronstadt, co-wrote hits for the Eagles, including “New Kid In Town” (#1, 1977), member of the Souther-Hillman-Furay Band, solo “You’re Only Lonely” (#7, 1979)
1946 ● Leonard “Chip” Hawkes → Bass and vocals for British Invasion pop-rock The Tremeloes, “Silence Is Golden” (US #11, UK #1, 1967), father of pop singer Chesney Hawkes
1947 ● Dave Pegg → Electric folk bassist for renowned Brit folk-rock Fairport Convention, “Si Tu Dos Partir” (UK #21, 1969), long-lived Brit folk-rock Jethro Tull, “Living In The Past” (#11, 1973), solo, producer
1952 ● Maxine Nightingale → Brit R&B/soul singer, “Right Back Where We Started From” (#2, 1976)
1956 ● Fred Fairbrass → Guitarist for dance-pop Right Said Fred, “I’m Too Sexy” (#1, 1991)
1957 ● Carter Beauford → Drummer for pop-funk-rock jam band Dave Matthews Band, “Don’t Drink The Water” (#4, 1998)
1961 ● k. d. lang (Kathryn Dawn Lang) → Canadian singer and songwriter, started as country-pop and shifted to adult contemporary and dance-pop, “Constant Craving” (#38, Adult Contemporary #2, 1992)
1962 ● Ron McGovney → Original bassist for heavy metal Metallica, “Enter Sandman” (#10, 1991), left in 1982 after several demo recordings but before the band’s first true album
1963 ● Bobby Dall → Bassist in hair metal/power ballad Poison, “Every Rose Has It’s Thorn” (#1, 1988)
1965 ● Andy Barker → Drummer in electronic/acid-house 808 State, “Pacific State” (, 1989)
1967 ● Alvin Chea → Vocals in a cappella gospel Take 6, “I L-O-V-E U” (R&B #19, 1990)
1969 ● Reginald “Fieldy” Arvizu → Bassist for nu metal Korn, “Here To Stay” (Mainstream #4, 2002)
1971 ● John Hampson → Guitarist and songwriter for indie power pop Nine Days, “Absolutely (Story Of A Girl)” (#6, 2000)
1974 ● Nelly (Cornell Haynes, Jr.) → Grammy-winning hip hop vocalist, “Country Grammar (Hot Shit)” (#7, 2000), record producer, music entrepreneur and record label CEO
1975 ● Chris Walla → Guitarist for indie pop-rock Death Cab For Cutie, “Soul Meets Body” (Modern Rock #5, 2005)

November 03

1930 ● Mable John → Underrated R&B, blues and gospel singer, the first female vocalist signed by Berry Gordy to his Tamla label (which preceded Motown Records by two years), left after several unsuccessful singles, recorded for Stax Records (“Your Good Thing Is About To End,” #95, R&B #6, 1966) and sang in Ray Charles‘ backing group, The Raelettes
1933 ● John Barry (Jonathan Barry Prendergrast) → Grammy- and Academy Award-winning film score composer for 11 James Bond films and others, including the theme song to Born Free (1966) and the soundtrack to Dances With Wolves (1989), died from a heart attack on 1/30/2011, age 77
1934 ● Bill Arhos → Creator and long-time executive producer of Austin City Limits, the PBS musical variety show that introduced much of America to the sound of redneck rock and progressive country music, and became the longest-running live concert program on television and the only TV show to receive the National Medal of Arts, died from heart disease on 4/11/2015, age 80, age 80
1941 ● Billy Bumble (R. C. Gamble) → Frontman for the touring version of novelty pop/rock B. Bumble & The Stingers, the collection of Rendezvous Records session musicians whose light rock instrumental covers of classical pieces included “Bumble Boogie” (#21, 1961) and “Nut Rocker” (#23, UK #1, 1962), left the music industry in 1965 and eventually became a college professor of economics, died on 8/2/2008, age 66
1941 ● Brian Poole → Lead singer and frontman for British Invasion pop-rock The Tremeloes, “Silence Is Golden” (US #11, UK #1, 1967), solo, daughters Karen and Shellie formed Alisha’s Attic in the 90s.
1943 ● Bert Jansch → Scottish acoustic blues and folk singer, songwriter and guitarist, 60s duo with John Renbourn then co-founded folk-rock group Pentangle (“Light Flight,” UK #43, 1970), continued to record and perform as a solo artist, in collaborative projects and with various lineups of Pentangle until his death from lung cancer on 10/5/2011, age 67
1945 ● Robert Jay “Bobby” LaKind → Lighting stagehand turned percussionist and backing vocals for blue-eyed soul/pop-rock The Doobie Brothers, “What A Fool Believes” (#1, 1979), gained songwriting co-credits on the band’s reunion album, Cycles (#17, 1989) but left shortly thereafter due to terminal colon cancer, which claimed his life on 12/24/1992, age 47
1946 ● Nick Simper → Bassist for early Brit rock ‘n’ roll Johnny Kidd & The Pirates, survived the 1966 car crash that killed Johnny Kidd, quit The Pirates in 1968 to co-found hard rock Deep Purple, fired in 1969 and pursued a solo career and founded/fronted hard rock Warhorse, Flying Fox and Fandango
1946 ● Tommy Dee (Thomas De Generes) → Guitarist in blue-eyed soul one hit wonder John Fred & His Playboy Band, “Judy In Disguise (With Glasses)” (#1, 1968)
1948 ● Lulu (Marie McDonald McLaughlin Lawrie) → Scottish pop singer and songwriter, “To Sir With Love” (#1, 1967), actress, TV host, continues performing in 2011
1953 ● Van Stephenson → Pop-rock singer and songwriter with three charting hits in the 80s, including “Modern Day Delilah” (#22, 1984), co-founded country-rock Blackhawk (“There You Have It,” #41, Country #4, 1998) in 1992 on guitar and backing vocals, left the band to fight skin cancer but died from the disease on 4/9/2001, age 47
1954 ● Adam Ant (Stuart Leslie Goddard) → Singer and frontman for post-punk New Wave glam-pop Adam & The Ants, “Goody Two Shoes” (#12, 1983), film and TV actor
1960 ● James Prime → Keyboards for Scottish indie pop-rock Deacon Blue, “Real Gone Kid” (UK #8, 1988)
1960 ● Matthew “Maff” Ashman → Underrated post-punk and New Wave guitarist with an early lineup of Adam And The Ants (“Goody Two-Shoes,” #12, 1982), left in 1980 to form Afro-Euro-synth-pop Bow Wow Wow (“I Want Candy,” #22, 1982), later co-founded post-punk Chiefs Of Relief and punk-revival Agent Provocateur, died from complications of diabetes on 11/11/1995, age 35
1962 ● Ian McNabb → Guitar and vocals for Brit neo-psychedelic rock Icicle Works, “Whisper To A Scream (Birds Fly)” (#37, 1984)
1962 ● Marilyn (Peter Anthony Robinson) → Brit New Romantic dance-pop singer, “Calling Your Name” (UK #4, 1983)
1969 ● Mark Roberts → Guitarist in Welsh indie-alt-rock Catatonia, “Mulder And Scully” (, 1998)
1969 ● Robert Miles (Roberto Concina) → Italian dream-house DJ, composer, producer and electronica musician, “Children” (Dance/Club #1, 1996)
1973 ● Mick Thomson → Lead guitarist for Grammy-winning alt metal/rap-metal Slipknot, “Duality” (Mainstream Rock #5, 2004)
1976 ● Ras (Rahsaan J. Bromfield) → Vocals in Brit R&B/dance-pop boy band Damage, “Wonderful Tonight” (UK #3, 1997)
1980 ● Dan Marsala → Guitar and vocals for alt rock/post-hardcore Story Of The Year, “Anthem Of Our Dying Day” (Modern Rock #10, 2004)

November 04

1938 ● Harry Elston → Vocalist in Ray Charles‘ backing group The Hi-Fi’s, then co-founder and singer in pop-rock vocal group The Friends Of Distinction, “Grazing In The Grass” (#3, 1969)
1940 ● Delbert McClinton → Texas blues and country-rock guitarist, harmonica player, singer and songwriter, “Giving It Up For Your Love” (#8, 1980), played on Bruce Channel‘s one hit wonder “Hey Baby” (#1, 1962), wrote “Two More Bottles Of Wine” for Emmylou Harris (Country #1, 1978)
1944 ● Scherrie Payne → Younger sister of R&B/soul singer Freda Payne and the “Little Lady With The Big Voice,” frontgal and lead vocals for The Supremes in the mid-70s during the waning years of the group’s popularity, scored three Top 10 Dance hits in the 70s, including “I’m Gonna Let My Heart Do the Walking”(Dance #3, 1976), continues to perform with various Supremes spin-offs and as a solo act into the 10s
1947 ● Michael Joseph “Mike” Smith → Saxophone for Welsh early prog rock septet Amen Corner, “(If Paradise Is) Half As Nice” (UK #1, 1969)
1954 ● Chris Difford → Guitarist, vocalist and lyricist for New Wave pop-rock Squeeze, “Tempted” (#49, Mainstream Rock #8, 1981)
1956 ● James Honeyman-Scott → Guitarist, songwriter and founding member of post-punk New Wave hard pop-rock The Pretenders, “Back On The Chain Gang” (#5, 1982), died from cocaine abuse on 6/16/1982, age 25
1963 ● Lena Hilda Zavaroni → Teen pop shooting star singer, discovered on UK TV talent show Opportunity Knocks, at 10 years old became the youngest British singer to earn a silver disc, “Ma! (He’s Making Eyes At Me)” (UK #10, 1974), died after years of battling anorexia nervosa on 10/1/1999, age 35
1965 ● Jeff Scott Soto → Puerto Rican-American heavy metal and arena rock vocalist for Talisman, Yngwie Malmsteen Band, Journey and solo
1965 ● Wayne Static (Wells) → Lead vocals, guitar, keyboards and programming for industrial metal band Static-X, “Push It” (Mainstream Rock #20, 1999), solo
1966 ● Kool Rock-ski (Damon Wimbley) → Member of novelty rap trio The Fat Boys, “Wipe Out” (#12, 1987), film actor and solo hip hop artist
1969 ● Puff Daddy aka P. Diddy (Sean John Combs) → Producer, Bad Boy Records founder, stage and screen actor, fashion designer, entrepreneur and Grammy-winning rapper, “I’ll Be Missing You” (#1, 1997)
1971 ● Shawn Rivera → Co-founder and vocals for contemporary R&B vocal group Az Yet, “Hard To Say I’m Sorry” (#8, 1997), producer, percussionist, session musician
1974 ● Louise Nurding Redknapp → Brit R&B/dance-pop singer for girl-group Eternal, “Stay” (#19, UK #3, 1993), then solo, “Naked” (UK #5, 1996)
1977 ● Kavana (Anthony Kavanaugh) → Brit actor, pop singer and songwriter, “I Can Make You Feel Good” (UK #8, 1997)

November 05

1911 ● Roy Rogers (Leonard Franklin Slye) → “King of the Cowboys,” hugely popular actor in Western films and on his own 50s TV program, business entrepreneur and twangy country-and-western singer with dozens of albums and a dozen charting singles, including “My Chickashay Gal” (Country #4, 1947), best known to current generations as the frontman for Roy Rogers Family Restaurants, died of congestive heart failure on 7/8/1998, age 86
1931 ● Harold McNair → Jamaican-born calypso and jazz saxophonist and flautist, worked as a sideman for Kenny Clarke, Quincy Jones and others, did session work for Donovan, John Martyn and others, fronted his own ensembles and co-founded jazz-blues-rock fusion Ginger Baker’s Air Force, died from lung cancer on 3/7/1971, age 39
1931 ● Ike Turner (Izear Luster Turner, Jr.) → Legendary R&B and rock ‘n’ roll bandleader, “Rocket 88” (R&B #1, 1951) and as a duo with then-wife Tina Turner, “Proud Mary” (#4, 1971), died from emphysema on 12/7/2007, age 76
1936 ● Bill Sherrill → Songwriter, record producer and Nashville music executive credited with mixing 60s pop maximalism with country music to create the “countrypolitan” sound and invigorate the careers of Tammy Wynette and George Jones, among others, co-wrote “Stand By Your Man” (#19, Country #1, 1968) with Wynette and “The Most Beautiful Girl ” (#1, Country #1, 1973) for Charlie Rich, produced albums for dozens of top artists, including Barbara Mandrell, Ray Charles, Johnny Paycheck and Elvis Costello, died after a brief illness on 8/4/2015, age 78
1941 ● Art Garfunkel → Grammy-winning folk-pop singer and guitarist in 60s partnership with Paul Simon, then adult contemporary pop solo career, “All I Know” (#9, 1973), film actor in Carnal Knowledge (1971)
1943 ● Mike Clifford → Pop singer and songwriter known best for his hit “Close To Cathy” (#12, 1962), also recorded numerous movie soundtrack songs in the late 60s and early 70s, continues to tour and record into the 10s
1943 ● Pablo Samellhi Gomez → Drummer for Spanish rock ‘n roll band Los Bravos, “Black Is Black” (US #4, 1966), the first US Top 10 hit by a Spanish band
1946 ● Gram Parsons (Cecil Ingram Connor III) → Legendary and pioneering country-rock singer, songwriter and guitarist, played in The International Submarine Band, joined The Byrds in 1968 for the seminal Sweetheart Of The Rodeo album, co-founded The Flying Burrito Brothers in 1969, issued two solo albums before dying from a heroin overdose on 9/19/1973, age 26
1946 ● Loleatta Holloway → Stage actress and backing vocalist, then R&B/disco singer, “Love Sensation” (Dance #1, 1980), continued to record dance/pop singles into the 00s, died from heart failure on 3/31/2011, age 64
1947 ● Peter Noone → Vocals and frontman for British Invasion pop-rock Herman’s Hermits, “Mrs. Brown You’ve Got A Lovely Daughter” (#1. 1965)
1948 ● Donnie McDougall → Guitarist for Canadian rockers The Guess Who, “American Woman” (#1, 1970), still performs with the group
1948 ● Peter Hammill → Guitarist, pianist, singer and songwriter for progressive/art rock Van Der Graf Generator, left the band in 1971 for solo career, releases solo (as Rikki Nadir) and VDGG reunion albums sporadically through 2008
1956 ● Helen O’Hara (nee Bevington) → Violinist in New Wave pop-rock Dexys Midnight Runners, “Come On Eileen” (#1, 1983), solo
1957 ● David Moyse → Guitarist for Aussie light pop-rock Air Supply, “The One That You Love” (#1, 1981)
1957 ● Mike Score → Keyboards, guitar and lead singer for bizarrely-teased hair New Wave pop-rock A Flock of Seagulls, “I Ran (So Far Away)” (#9, 1982)
1959 ● Bryan Guy Adams → Grammy-winning Canadian pop-rock power songwriter and balladeer, “(Everything I Do) I Do It For You” (#1, 1991) and 18 other Top 40 hits
1959 ● Ken Coomer → Drummer for alt-metal Clockhammer, joined seminal roots rock trio Uncle Tupelo in 1992, left in 1994 to co-found alt country-rock Wilco, “Outtasite (Outta Mind)” (#22, 1997)
1959 ● Rob Fisher → Keyboards, vocals and songwriting for New Wave synth-pop Naked Eyes, “(There’s) Always Something There To Remind Me” (#10, 1983) and pop-soul Climie Fisher, “Love Changes Everything” (#23, 1988), died following surgery for intestinal cancer on 8/25/1999. age 39
1961 ● David Bryson → Guitarist for alt-rock Counting Crows, “Mr. Jones” (Modern Rock #2, 1994)
1965 ● Paris Grey (Shanna Jackson) → Vocals and one half of the house and electro-techno/dance-pop duo Inner City, “Big Fun” (Dance-Club #1, 1984)
1968 ● Mark Hunter → Keyboards for Brit alt pop-rock James, “Sit Down” (UK #2, 1991) and “Laid” (#61, Modern Rock #3, 1994)
1971 ● Jon Greenwood → Guitar and keyboards for alt/indie rock Radiohead, “There There” (Modern Rock #14, 2003)
1974 ● David Ryan Adams → Alt country-rock singer and songwriter, “New York, New York” (Adult Top 40 #18, 2002) and with country-rock The Cardinals
1975 ● Lisa Scott-Lee → Vocals and dance routines for pre-fab Brit dance-pop group The Steps, “5, 6, 7, 8” (UK #14, 1997)
1985 ● Kate Jenna DeAraugo → Australian singer, winner of the third season of Australian Idol in 2005, solo, “Maybe Tonight” (Australia #1, 2005) then joined pre-fab dance-pop girl group Young Divas
1987 ● Kevin Jonas → Singer in teen-pop ballad trio the Jonas Brothers, “Burnin’ Up” (#5, 2008), TV actor

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This Week’s Birthdays (October 23 – 29)

Happy Birthday this week to:

October 23

1930 ● Wilson “Boozoo” Chavis → Accordion maestro and one of the principal architects of the modern Zydeco sound, the music created by French-speaking Louisiana Creoles, refused to play publicly following his single, the first Zydeco hit “Paper In My Shoe” (1954) but returned in 1984 to tour and record until just prior to his death from complications of a heart attack on 5/5/2001, age 70
1939 ● Charlie Foxx → With sister Inez, one half of the one hit wonder R&B/soul duo Inez & Charlie Foxx, “Mockingbird” (#7, 1963), died from leukemia on 9/18/1998, age 58
1940 ● Eleanor Louise “Ellie” GreenwichBrill Building pop music songwriter, singer and producer, wrote or co-wrote multiple hit songs (often with Phil Spector or husband Jeff Barry), including “Be My Baby” for The Ronettes (#2, 1963), “Chapel Of Love” for The Dixie Cups (#1, 1964) and “Hanky Panky” for Tommy James & The Shondells (#1, 1966), died of a heart attack on 8/26/2009, age 68
1943 ● Barbara Ann Hawkins → With sister Rosa Lee Hawkins and cousin Joan Marie Johnson, vocals in 60s R&B/pop girl-group The Dixie Cups, “Chapel Of Love” (#1, 1964)
1947 ● Greg Ridley → Co-founder and bassist for blues-rock Spooky Tooth, left in 1969 to co-found Humble Pie, “30 Days In The Hole” (1972) and “Hot ‘N’ Nasty” (#52, 1972), left music in 1975 but returned for Humble Pie reunions after 2001, died of pneumonia on 11/19/2003, age 56
1949 ● Michael “Würzel” Burston → Guitarist for early punk-metal Motörhead, “Ace Of Spades” (UK #15, 1980), left the band for solo career, died from heart disease on 7/9/2011, age 61
1953 ● Pauline Black → Vocals in New Wave 2 Tone ska revival The Selecter, “On My Radio” (UK #8, 1979)
1956 ● Dwight Yoakam → Grammy-winning, pioneering roots-country singer, songwriter and guitarist, “Streets Of Bakersfield” (Country #1, 1988) and 13 other Country Top 10 hits
1957 ● Kelly Marie (Jacqueline McKinnon) → Scottish R&B/disco-pop vocalist, “Feels Like I’m In Love” (UK #1, 1980)
1959 ● Alfred Matthew “Weird Al” Yankovic → Grammy-winning comedian, multi-instrumentalist and song parodist, “Eat It” (#12, 1984) parodying Michael Jackson‘s “Beat It” and “White & Nerdy” (#9, 2006) parodying “Ridin'” by Chamillionaire
1964 ● Roberto Trujillo → Bassist in thrash metal Suicidal Tendencies, “I’ll Hate You Better” (Mainstream Rock #34, 1993) and side project funk-metal Infectious Grooves, joined Ozzy Osbournes band in 1994 and Metallica in 2003
1966 ● David Thomas → Vocals in a cappella gospel Take 6, “I L-O-V-E U” (R&B #19, 1990)
1972 ● Richard McNamara → Guitarist in Brit-pop rockers Embrace, “Gravity” (Modern Rock #36, UK #7, 2004)
1986 ● Miguel (Miguel Jontel Pimentel) → R&B/pop soul singer and guitarist with seven R&B Top 10 hits as a solo or featured artist, including “Adorn” (#17, R&B #1, 2012)

October 24

1911 ● Sonny Terry (Saunders Terrell) → Blues and folk harmonica player, developed the “whoopin'” style, session man for Woody Guthrie, Pete Seeger and others, Broadway and TV actor, died of natural causes on 3/11/1986, age 74
1930 ● The Big Bopper (Jiles Perry “J.P.” Richardson, Jr.) → Booming-voiced early rock ‘n’ roll DJ, singer and bandleader, “Chantilly Lace” (#6, 1958), died along with Buddy Holly and Ritchie Valens in an Iowa plane crash on the night of 2/3/1959, age 28
1936 ● Bill Wyman (William George Perks) → Three-decade bassist for megastar hard rock The Rolling Stones, “Brown Sugar” (#1, 1971), issued solo albums in the 70s, co-founded supergroup Willie And The Poor Boys in the 80s, quit The Stones and now fronts The Rhythm Kings featuring Albert Lee and Peter Frampton
1936 ● Jimmy “Fast Fingers” Dawkins → Blues guitarist and mellow-voiced singer known as a pioneer of the aggressive, percussive “West Side” Chicago blues style, recorded and toured with Otis Rush, Andrew “Big Voice” Odom and others, his debut album Fast Fingers (1969) won the Grand Prix du Disque de Jazz from the Hot Club of France in 1971 as the year’s top album, died of undisclosed causes on 4/10/2013, age 76
1937 ● Santo Farina → Steel guitarist in Italian-American one hit wonder brother duo Santo & Johnny, pop-rock guitar instrumental “Sleepwalk” (#1, 1959)
1942 ● Donald W. Gant → Singer, songwriter and record producer, one half of pop-rock duo The Neon Philharmonic, “Morning Girl” (#17, 1969), produced albums for Jimmy Buffett, Lefty Frizzell and others, died following a serious boating accident on 3/15/1987, age 44
1944 ● Bettye Swann (Betty Jean Champion) → One hit wonder R&B/Southern soul singer, “Make Me Yours” (#21, R&B #1, 1967), now a retired teacher
1944 ● Ted Templeman → Singer, guitarist and vocal arranger in folk-sunshine-pop Harper’s Bizarre, “Feelin’ Groovy” (#13, 1967), then record producer for Van Morrison, Little Feat, The Doobie Brothers, Van Halen and others
1946 ● Jerry Edmonton (Gerald McCrohan) → Drummer in Canadian-American hard rock, proto-metal Steppenwolf, “Born To Be Wild” (#2, 1968), died in a car accident on 11/29/1993, age 47
1947 ● Robert Edgar Broughton → Singer, guitarist and frontman for Brit blues then prog-rock Edgar Broughton Band, “Apache Dropout” (UK #33, 1970)
1948 ● Barry Ryan (Sapherson) → Singer with identical twin brother in pop Paul & Barry Ryan, “Don’t Bring Me Your Heartaches” (1965), solo, “Eloise” (UK #1, 1968), currently a professional photographer
1948 ● Paul Ryan (Sapherson) → Singer and songwriter with identical twin brother in pop vocal duo Paul & Barry Ryan, “Don’t Bring Me Your Heartaches” (1965), wrote his brother’s solo hit, “Eloise” (UK #1, 1968), left the industry and managed a chain of hairdressing salons until his death from lung cancer on 11/29/1992, age 44
1948 ● Terence Dale “Buffin” Griffin → Drummer in early Brit glam-rockers Mott The Hoople, “All The Young Dudes” (#37, 1972), producer for The Cult, Hanoi Rocks, Nirvana and others, including BBC Radio 1 DJ John Peel
1949 ● Perry Lee “Tiny” Tavares → Cape Verdean-American singer with his four brothers in R&B/funk-disco Tavares, “Heaven Must Be Missing An Angel” (#15, 1976), continued to tour into the 10s
1962 ● Debbie Googe → Bassist for art-prog-rock, “shoe-gazing” pioneers My Bloody Valentine, “Only Shallow” (Modern Rock #27, 1992)
1969 ● Rob Green → Drummer in blue-eyed soul revival and trad rock Toploader, “Dancing In The Moonlight” (UK #7, 2000)
1970 ● Alonza Bevan → Bassist for post-Britpop psych/mystic rock Kula Shaker, “Hush” (Mainstream Rock #19, 1997)
1970 ● Edward Daniel “Eds” Chesters → Drummer for indie rock The Bluetones, “Slight Return” (UK #2, 1996)
1978 ● Sabrina Washington → Lead vocals in “UK urban” R&B/dance-pop trio Mis-Teeq, “One Night Stand” (Dance/Club #4, 2004), solo and TV actress
1979 ● Ben Gillies → Co-founder and drummer for Aussie alt-grunge-rock Silverchair, “Tomorrow” (Modern Rock #1, 1994)
1980 ● Monica (Arnold) → R&B/urban contemporary singer, “Before You Walk Out Of My Life” (#7, R&B #1, 1995) and seven other Top 10 hits
1983 ● Adrienne Bailon → Hip hop soul and R&B/dance-teen-pop 3LW (aka 3 Little Women), “No More (Baby I’ma Do Right)” (#23, 2001) and Disney pre-fab dance-pop Cheetah Girls, “Strut” (#53, 2006), TV host and film actress
1986 ● Drake (Aubrey Drake Graham) → Canadian R&B/hip hop vocalist, “Find Your Love” (#5, 2010) and six other Top 40 hits, TV actor

October 25

1912 ● Minnie Pearl (Sarah Ophelia Colley Cannon) → Country music singer and comedian with more than 50 years at the Grand Ole Opry and 22 years on the seminal country music TV variety program Hee Haw, known for her signature price-tagged straw hat and folksy mountain demeanor, scored one Country Top 10 hit (“Giddyup Go – Answer,” Country #10, 1966) but influenced countless younger female artists, died following a massive stroke on 3/4/1996, age 83
1924 ● Earl Palmer → R&B, rock and pop session drummer who played on thousands of songs by Fats Domino, Little Richard, The Monkees and others, on scores of albums by Duane Eddy, Taj Mahal, Tim Buckley and others, and on dozens of film scores (Hud, How To Stuff A Wild Bikini and others) and TV theme songs (77 Sunset Strip, Green Acres, The Partridge Family and others), one of the first session musicians elected to the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame (2000), died following a long illness on 9/19/2008, age 78
1937 ● Jeanne Black → Country music TV variety show singer and Las Vegas nightclub act, brushed fame as a one hit wonder country-pop singer, “He’ll Have To Stay” (#4, Country #6, R&B #11, 1960), the answer song to Jim Reeve‘s “He’ll Have To Go” (#2, Country #1, 1960), died peacefully on 10/23/2014, age 76
1941 ● Helen Reddy → Aussie TV actress and light pop/adult contemporary singer with eleven Top 20 hits in the 70s including the Grammy-winning “I Am Woman” (#1, 1971)
1943 ● Roy Lynes → Keyboards and backing vocals for Brit psych-boogie rock Status Quo, “Pictures Of Matchstick Men” (#12, 1968), continues to perform with tribute bands Quo Vadis and Statoz Quo
1944 ● Jon Anderson (John Roy Anderson) → Keyboards, songwriter, lead vocals and founding member of archetypal, pioneer progressive rock band Yes (“Roundabout,” #13, 1971) and various off-shoots and side projects through the 00s, plus solo work (“Cage Of Freedom,” Mainstream Rock #17, 1984) and collaborations
1944 ● Taffy Nivert Danoff → Vocals in one hit wonder light pop-rock Starland Vocal Band, “Afternoon Delight” (#1, 1976)
1946 ● John Hall → Drummer for Brit reggae-pop The Equals, “Baby Come Back” (#32, 1968)
1947 ● Glenn Tipton → Lead guitarist for popular and influential “New Wave” heavy metal band Judas Priest, “You’ve Got Another Thing Comin'” (#67, Mainstream Rock #4, 1982) plus the 2009 Grammy-winning album Dissident Aggressor
1950 ● Chris Norman → Lead vocals and rhythm guitar for glam-pop-rock Smokie, “Living Next Door To Alice” (#25, UK #3, 1977), left in 1982 for solo career, “Midnight Lady” (Germany #1, 1986)
1951 ● Richard Lloyd → Guitar and vocals for early and influential punk-rock Television, “Marquee Moon” (1977), solo, producer and guitar teacher
1955 ● Matthias Jabs → Guitarist in German hard rock/metal Scorpions, “Rock You Like A Hurricane” (#25, 1984), still with the band in 2010
1957 ● Robbie McIntosh → Session guitarist and bandleader, played in The Pretenders (“Back On The Chain Gang,” #5, 1983) from 1982 to 1987 and Paul McCartney‘s Wings in the 90s
1960 ● Christina Amphlett → Vocals for Aussie power pop Divinyls, “I Touch Myself” (#4, 1991), co-wrote “Science Fiction” (AUS #13, 1982), included in 2001 as one of the Top 30 Australian songs of all time by the Australian Performing Right Association (APRA), died after a long fight with breast cancer on 4/21/2013, age 52
1961 ● Chad Smith → Drummer in funk-rock Red Hot Chili Peppers, “Californication” (Modern Rock #1, 2000)
1961 ● Pat Sharp (Patrick Sharpin) → Brit TV host and radio DJ (BBC Radio 1, Capital FM, Radio Mercury)
1963 ● John Leven → Bassist for Swedish hard rock/glam-metal Europe, “The Final Countdown” (#8, 1986)
1965 ● Nick Thorpe → Bassist for Brit teen-pop blue-eyed soul Curiosity Killed The Cat, “Down To Earth” (UK #3, 1986)
1968 ● Speech (Todd Thomas) → Vocals and MC for African-centric, progressive hip hop/funk-soul-blues Arrested Development, “Mr. Wendal” (#6, 1992), solo
1970 ● Lloyd Edward “Ed” Robertson → Guitarist for Canadian alt-rock Barenaked Ladies, “One Week” (#1, 1998)
1981 ● Jerome Isaac “Romeo” then “Young Rome” Jones → Rapper, singer for L.A. pre-teen R&B/pop-rap Immature, “Never Lie” (#5, 1994), then name change to Imx, “Stay The Night” (#23, 1999), actor
1984 ● Katy Perry (Katheryn Elizabeth Hudson) → Contemporary dance-club/pop-rock singer and songwriter, “I Kissed A Girl” (#1, 2008), TV and voice actress
1985 ● Ciara Princess Harris → The “First Lady of Crunk & B,” contemporary R&B/soul-pop dancer and vocalist, “Goodies” (#1, 2004), actress and fashion model

October 26

1911 ● Mahalia Jackson → The “Queen of Gospel,” vastly influential gospel superstar singer, “He’s Got The Whole World In His Hands” (#69, 1958), three-time Grammy winner, civil rights activist and philanthropist, died from heart failure on 1/27/1972, age 60
1913 ● Charlie Barnet → Jazz saxophonist, composer and leader of a early racially-integrated band, noted for penning more than twenty-five Billboard chart hits in the Swing era between 1939 and 1946, including “Cherokee,” “Redskin Rhumba” and “Skyliner,” married 11 times, the final one lasting 33 years, died from complications of Alzheimer’s disease and pneumonia on 9/4/1991, age 77
1929 ● Neal Matthews → Vocals in country-gospel-pop backing quartet The Jordanaires, recorded with Elvis Presley (1957-1972), Patsy Cline, Tom Jones, Merle Haggard and others, died of a heart attack on 4/21/2000, age 70
1936 ● Alvin Wayne “Al” Casey → Piano and guitar with early rocker Duane Eddy‘s Rebels, wrote Eddy‘s early hit “Ramrod” (#27, R&B #17, 1958) and co-wrote “Forty Miles Of Bad Road” (#9, 1959), issued several mostly instrumental solo albums in the 60s and scored three minor chart singles, including ” Surfin’ Hootenanny” (#48, 1963), turned to session work as a member of the acclaimed Wrecking Crew group of L.A. studio musicians and recorded with numerous top artists, owned a Los Angeles music store for 20 years, retired in 1993 and died on 9/17/2006, age 69
1944 ● Alan Henderson → Bassist for Irish garage-rock, proto-punk Them, “Gloria” (#71, 1966)
1944 ● Michael Piano → Singer in light folk sunshine-pop, two hit wonder vocal trio The Sandpipers, “Guantanamera” (#9, 1966) and “Come Saturday Morning” (#17, 1970)
1946 ● Keith Hopwood → Guitarist in British Invasion pop-rock Herman’s Hermits, “Mrs. Brown You’ve Got A Lovely Daughter” (#1. 1965)
1951 ● Maggie Roche → Singer/songwriter in critically-acclaimed but commercially-marginal female folk-pop harmony vocal sister trio The Roches, backed Paul Simon, solo
1951 ● William “Bootsy” Collins → R&B/funk bassist, singer and songwriter, with James Brown band in the 60s and Parliament-Funkadelic in the 70s, frontman for Bootsy’s Rubber Band, “Bootzilla” (R&B #1, 1978)
1952 ● David Was (David Weiss) → Lyricist, keyboardist and co-frontman for eclectic R&B and rock fusion Was (Not Was), “Walk The Dinosaur” (#7, 1989), producer, music journalist and theme song composer
1953 ● Keith Strickland → Guitars, keyboards and occasional drums for New Wave alt-dance-rock The B-52’s, “Love Shack” (#3, 1989)
1962 ● Steve Wren → Drummer for New Wave synth-pop-soul Then Jerico, “The Motive” (UK #18, 1987)
1963 ● Natalie Merchant → Lead vocals and songwriting for folk-pop 10,000 Maniacs, “These Are Days” (Alt-Rock #1, 1992), left in 1993 for solo career, “Carnival” (#10, 1995)
1965 ● Judge Jules (Julius O’Riordan) → UK dance music remixer, producer and radio DJ, first with pirate radio Kiss FM and since 1987 with BBC Radio 1 in various time slots
1967 ● Keith Urban → New Zealand-born Nashville contemporary country-pop crossover guitarist, songwriter and three-time Grammy winner, “Sweet Thing” (#30, Country #1, 2008)
1978 ● Mark Barry → Vocals for short-lived teen pop-rock trio BBMak, “Back Here” (#13, 2000), now a personal fitness trainer
1981 ● Guy Sebastian → Australian adult contemporary/soul-pop singer/songwriter, winner of the first Australian Idol series, “Angels Brought Me Here” (Australian #1, 2003)
1986 ● Schoolboy Q (Quincy Matthew Hanley) → Hip hop singer and recording artist, originally with self-anointed supergroup Black Hippy, since 2009 solo singer with the debut hit album Oxymoron (#1, Rap #1, R&B #1, CAN #1, 2014) and the single “Studio” (#38, Rap #5, R&B #10, 2014)

October 27

1924 ● Bonnie Lou (Mary Joan Okum) → Pioneering country-pop, rockabilly and early rock ‘n’ roll singer and later TV show host with several crossover hits and the early rocker “Daddy O” (#14, 1955), dubbed “Queen” of the country music Midwestern Hayride program on NBC-TV through the early 70s, died in her sleep on 12/8/2015, age 91
1924 ● Gary Chester (Cesario Gurciullo) → Top-rated session drummer from doo wop to rock and pop, co-author of two instruction books on drumming, worked with the Coasters, The Monkees, Dionne Warwick, Country Joe McDonald, Van Morrison and many others on hundreds of albums and thousands of songs, died 8/17/1987, age 62
1933 ● Floyd Cramer → Country-pop/easy listening “Nashville sound” pianist with the unique “slip-note” style, issued several hit singles (including “Last Date,” #2, 1960) and albums of instrumental covers, worked as a session musician with Elvis Presley, Brenda Lee, Roy Orbison, The Everly Brothers and others, died of lung cancer on 12/31/1997, age 64
1942 ● Melvin Lee Greenwood → Country-pop singer and songwriter, “God Bless The USA” (Country #7, 1984) re-released in October 2001 (#16, Country #16, 2001) and 18 other Country Top 10 singles plus a Grammy Award
1945 ● Dick Dodd (Joseph Richard Dodd, Jr.) → Original cast member of The Mickey Mouse Club beginning in 1955, formed instrumental surf rock The Bel-Airs and played drums on the regional hit “Mr. Moto” (1961), joined garage/proto-punk The Standells in 1964 as drummer and sang lead vocals on “Dirty Water” (#11, 1966), toured with the group occasionally until dying of cancer on 11/29/2013, age 68
1945 ● Mark Ryan → Bass guitarist for early 70s lineup of psych-rock Quicksilver Messenger Service (“Fresh Air,” #49, 1970), later in funk-rock Bodacious D.F. with ex-Jefferson Airplane singer Marty Balin
1948 ● Byron Allred → Keyboards in blues-rock then psych-rock then pop-rock Steve Miller Band, “The Joker” (#1, 1973)
1949 ● Clifford Antone → Club owner, record label executive and one of the architects of the Austin, TX blues music scene, founded Antone’s blues club in 1975 and featured blues artists such as B. B. King, Fats Domino, Stevie Ray Vaughan and others, chief executive of independent label Antone’s Records and university lecturer, died from unspecified causes on 5/23/2006, age 56
1949 ● Gary Tallent → Bassist in Bruce Springsteen‘s E Street Band, producer, sessions, record company executive
1951 ● Kenneth “K.K.” Downing, Jr. → Lead guitarist for popular and influential “New Wave” heavy metal band Judas Priest, “You’ve Got Another Thing Comin'” (#67, Mainstream Rock #4, 1982) plus the 2009 Grammy-winning album Dissident Aggressor
1953 ● Peter Dodd → Guitarist with New Wave synth-pop Thompson Twins, “Hold Me Now” (#3, 1983)
1956 ● Hazell Dean (Poole) → Brit dance-pop singer and H-NRG artist, “Searchin’ (I Gotta Find A Man)” (Dance/Club #8, 1983) and two other Dance/Club Top 20 hits
1958 ● Simon LeBon → Lead singer and lyricist for New Wave pop-rock Duran Duran, “Hungry Like The Wolf” (#3, 1982), still recording in 2011
1967 ● Scott Weiland → Founding member and lead vocals for alt hard rock Stone Temple Pilots, “Interstate Love Song” (#18, 1994), died in his sleep after years of drug abuse on 12/3/2015, age 48
1984 ● Kelly Osbourne → Reality TV actress, socialite and teen-pop-rock singer, “Papa Don’t Preach” (Mainstream Rock #25, UK #3, 2002), daughter of metal superstar Ozzy and manager-wife Sharon Osbourne, fashion designer, TV judge and host

October 28

1927 ● Cleo Laine (Clementine Dinah Campbell) → Grammy-winning, highly-regarded jazz-pop scat vocalist in husband Johnny Dankworth‘s Big Band and as a solo performer, “You’ll Answer To Me” (UK #5, 1961), stage actress
1936 ● Charlie Daniels → Country and Southern rock legend, bandleader, guitarist and fiddler, “The Devil Went Down To Georgia” (#3, 1979) with albums and singles in six decades from 1961
1937 ● Graham Bond → Early and important but underappreciated Brit R&B/blues-rock musician, first with Blues Incorporated, fronted the Graham Bond Organization with Jack Bruce and Ginger Baker, committed suicide by throwing himself in front of a London tube train on 5/8/1974, age 36
1939 ● Jim Post → Singer and songwriter with his wife Cathy Conn in one hit wonder folk-pop duo Friend & Lover with the inspirational pop hit “Reach Out Of The Darkness” (#10, 1968), they disbanded and divorced after failing to find a follow-up hit, continued to write and perform folk music in the Chicago area into the 10s
1940 ● Jay Proctor → Founder and frontman for integrated Philly soul-pop Jay & The Techniques, “Apples, Peaches, Pumpkin Pie” (#6, R&B #8, 1967), plus two other Top 40 hits in the 60s and two disco singles in the 70s
1941 ● Curtis Lee → Early pop-rock ‘n’ roll one hit wonder singer, “Pretty Little Angel Eyes” (#7, 1961)
1941 ● Hank Marvin (Brian Robson Rankin) → Guitarist with instrumental pop-rock The Shadows, “Apache” (Worldwide #1, 1960)
1942 ● Raymond Steinberg → Baritone for blue-eyed soul/doo wop The Reflections (“(Just Like) Romeo And Juliet,” #6, 1964)
1945 ● Wayne Fontana (Glyn Geoffrey Ellis) → Frontman for British Invasion pop-rock band The Mindbenders, “Game Of Love” (#1, 1965), then solo, “Pamela Pamela” (UK #11, 1967), still performing on the oldies circuit
1947 ● George Glover → Keyboards and backing vocals for Brit blues-rock Climax Blues Band, “Couldn’t Get It Right” (#3, 1977)
1948 ● Telma Louise Hopkins → TV sitcom actress and former light-pop backing vocalist in Tony Orlando & Dawn, “Knock Three Times” (#1, 1971) and nine other Top 20 hits
1953 ● Desmond Child (John Charles Barrett) → Grammy-winning songwriter and producer with 70 Top 40 singles, frontman for Desmond Child & Rouge, “Our Love Is Insane” (#50, 1979), then wrote and produced for Kiss, Aerosmith, Bon Jovi, Joan Jett, Cher, Michael Bolton, Hilary Duff, Kelly Clarkson and others
1957 ● Stephen Morris → Drummer for post-punk Joy Division, “Love Will Tear Us Apart” (Dance/Club #42, UK #13, 1980), then New Wave electro-dance-pop New Order, “Blue Monday” (Dance/Club #5, 1983) and The Other Two, “Selfish” (Dance/Club #6, 1993)
1958 ● William Reid → Guitarist, composer and lead singer for Scottish alt-pop-rock Jesus And Mary Chain, “Sometimes Always” (Modern Rock #4, 1994)
1959 ● Neville Henry → Saxophone in New Wave pop-rock Blow Monkeys, “Digging Your Scene” (#14, 1986)
1963 ● Eros Ramazzotti → Hugely-successful Italian pop singer and songwriter with over 70 million albums sold worldwide in a 30-year career but few in the US, recorded duets with Cher, Tina Turner, Joe Cocker, Ricky Martin and others
1969 ● Benjamin Chase “Ben” Harper → Multi-instrumentalist singer and songwriter with an unusual and effective mix of blues, folk-rock, funky soul and pop that garnered three Grammys, including Best Traditional Soul Gospel album in 2005, and several charting singles (“Steal My Kisses,” #15, 2000)
1972 ● Brad Paisley → Country and Southern rock crossover singer, songwriter and guitarist, charted 18 singles on the Billboard Hot 100 chart and 25 on the Hot Country Songs list, 16 of which reached Country #1 with a record 10 consecutive singles in the top spot, including “Remind Me” (#17, Country #1, 2011)

October 29

1922 ● Neal Hefti → Jazz composer/arranger who wrote charts for Earl Hines, Count Basie and others and played trumpet with Woody Herman‘s First Herd, but best known for penning TV’s “Batman Theme” (#35, 1966) and the title song and soundtrack to The Odd Couple (1968), died of throat cancer on 10/11/2008, age 85
1937 ● Sonny Osborne → With his older brother, Bobby, one half of the influential bluegrass act The Osborne Brothers, “Rocky Top” (Country #33, 1967), the song was voted the official state song of Tennessee and one of two the brothers recorded, the other being “My Old Kentucky Home” (Country #69, 1970)
1944 ● Denny Laine (Brian F. A. Hines) → First lead guitarist and vocals for The Moody Blues, “Go Now” (#10, 1965), left to join Ginger Baker’s Air Force and then Paul McCartney‘s Wings, “Band On The Run” (#1, 1974), solo since the early 80s
1944 ● Robbie Van Leeuwen → Guitar and backing vocals in Dutch one hit wonder pop-rock Shocking Blue, “Venus” (#1, 1970)
1945 ● Melba Moore (Beatrice Melba Smith) → R&B/soul-disco singer, “Love’s Comin’ At Ya” (Dance/Club #2, 1982), Tony Award-winning Broadway stage actress
1945 ● Mick Gallagher → Brit organist, bandmember and session musician, with blues-rock The Animals and psych-pop Skip Bifferty in the 60s, proto-punk Ian Dury And The Blockheads and punk-rock The Clashh in the 70s and 80s, worked with Paul McCartney, Dave Stewart and Annie Lennox, currently tours with The Blockheads and John Steele‘s The Animals And Friends
1946 ● Peter Green (Greenbaum) → Blues-rock guitarist and songwriter, replaced Eric Clapton in John Mayall’s Bluesbreakers in 1966, co-founded Fleetwood Mac in 1967 as a blues-rock band, wrote “Oh Well” (#55, UK #2, 1969) and other early hits, left in 1970 and suffered psychiatric problems through the 70s, returned to limited collaborations and sessions in the 80s , ranked #38 on Rolling Stone magazine’s 100 Greatest Guitarists of All Time
1948 ● Ricky Lee “Ricochet” Reynolds → Guitarist for Southern raunch-rock Black Oak Arkansas, “Jim Dandy To The Rescue” (Top 30, 1973), continued with the band into the 00s
1949 ● David Paton → Scottish bassist, singer and songwriter with soft pop-rock Pilot, wrote “Magic” (#1, 1974), solo and session work
1954 ● Stephen Luscombe → Multi-instrumentalist in New Wave synth-pop duo Blancmange, “Don’t Tell Me” (UK #8, 1984)
1955 ● Kevin Dubrow → Co-founder and lead singer in heavy metal/pop-metal Quiet Riot (“Bang Your Head (Metal Health),” #31, 1984), died from a cocaine overdose on 11/25/2007, age 52
1955 ● Roger O’Donnell → Session keyboardist with New Wave synth-pop Thompson Twin, Berlin and The Psychedelic Furs, in 1987 joined post-punk art-glam-goth rock The Cure, “Love Song” (#2, 1989) and over 20 other UK Top 40 singles, solo
1961 ● Steven Randall “Little Randy” Jackson → Multi-instrumentalist, songwriter and youngest member of R&B/pop-soul brother act The Jackson 5, co-wrote “Shake Your Body (Down To The Ground)” (#6, 1979)
1962 ● Einar Orn Benediktsson → Vocals for Icelandic alt pop-rock The Sugarcubes, “Hit” (Modern Rock #1, 1991)
1965 ● Peter Timmins → Drummer in Canadian alt-art-country-blues-rock Cowboy Junkies, “Sweet Jane” (Modern Rock #5, 1989)
1969 ● Doug “S.A.” Martinez → Lead vocals and turntables for hip hop/reggae/punk rock fusion band 311, “Love Song” (#59, Modern Rock #1, 200$)
1969 ● Roni Size (Ryan Owen Granville Williams) → Brit record producer and DJ, founder and frontman for hip hop drum and bass act Reprazent, Mercury Music Prize-winning album New Forms (1997)
1970 ● Toby Smith → Keyboards in Grammy-winning Brit acid jazz-funk-pop Jamiroquai, “Canned Heat” (Dance #1, 1999), currently manager and producer for indie pop The Hoosiers, “Worried About Ray” (UK #5, 2007)
1984 ● Chris Baio → Bassist for indie Afro-pop/rock Vampire Weekend, “Cousins” (Alt Rock #18, 2009)

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This Week’s Birthdays (October 9 – 15)

Happy Birthday this week to:

October 09

1920 ● Yusef Abdul Lateef (William Emanuel Huddleston) → Jazz, swing, bop, New Age and world music multi-instrumentalist (primarily saxophone), composer, educator, music publisher and doctoral PhD whose 60-year career included session work, band membership, solo albums, touring groups and highest-level professorship stints, died after a long battle with prostate cancer on 12/23/2013, age 93
1937 ● Pat Burke → Jamaican-born flautist and saxophonist in Brit R&B/soul-pop The Foundations, “Baby Now That I’ve Found You” (#11, 1967)
1939 ● Overton Vertis “O.V.” Wright → R&B/gospel then Southern soul balladeer, “You’re Gonna Make Me Cry” (R&B #6, 1965) and five other R&B Top 40 hits, died from a drug abuse-related heart attack on 11/16/1980, age 41
1940 ● John Winston Lennon → Singer, songwriter, guitarist and founding member of The Beatles, with collaborator Paul McCartney co-wrote 21 US #1 hits, expressive if often neglected solo career, “Imagine” (#3, 1971) and 14 other Top 40 hits, social activist, sometime film actor, murdered outside his New York City apartment by a deranged fan on 12/8/1980, age 40
1944 ● John Entwistle → Influential bass guitarist and founding member of The Who, “I Can See For Miles” (#9, 1967) plus 16 other Top 40 hits, solo, “Talk Dirty” (Mainstream Rock #41, 1982), Rolling Stone magazine reader poll #1 rock bassist of all time, died from a cocaine-induced heart attack on 6/27/2002, age 57
1944 ● Nona Hendryx → R&B/soul, funk, pop and World music singer, songwriter and producer, founding member of 60s doo wop girl group The Bluebelles, which morphed into disco-funk Labelle, “Lady Marmalade” (#1, 1975), solo, “Why Should I Cry?” (#58, R&B #5, 1987), collaboration with Keith Richards, “Rock This House” (1985) and others, film and radio actress
1948 ● Clyde Jackson Browne → Laid-back California folk-rock singer, songwriter and guitarist, “Running On Empty” (#11, 1977) and nine other Top 40 singles and four Top 20 albums
1954 ● James Fearnley → Accordion for Irish folk-punk-rock The Pogues, “Tuesday Morning” (Rock #11, 1993)
1957 ● Ini Kamoze (Cecil Campbell) → One hit wonder reggae/dance-club singer, “Here Comes The Hotstepper” (#1, 1994)
1959 ● Thomas Wydler → Swiss drummer and core member of Aussie alt rock Nick Cave And The Bad Seeds, “Where The Wild Roses Grow” (Australia #2, UK #11, 1995)
1961 ● Kurt Neumann → Founder, guitar and vocals for roots rock The BoDeans, “Closer To Free” (#16, 1993)
1967 ● Mat Osman → Bassist for Britpop indie rock Suede, “Trash” (UK #3, 1996)
1968 ● Vix (Victoria Perks) → Violin and vocals for all-girl New Wave pop-punk quartet Fuzzbox (originally We’ve Got A Fuzz Box And We’re Gonna Use It), “International Rescue” (UK #11, 1989)
1969 ● Polly Jean “P.J.” Harvey → Alt rock singer/songwriter and guitarist, bandleader for her self-named trio and solo artist, “Down By The Water” (Alt Rock #2, 1995)
1973 ● Terry Balsamo → Lead guitarist for alt heavy metal Cold, “Stupid Girl” (Mainstream Rock #4, 2003), left to join Grammy-winning goth-pop-metal Evanescence, “My Immortal” (#7, 2004)
1975 ● Sean Ono Lennon → Avant garde-pop singer, songwriter, guitarist, actor, producer, son of John Lennon and Yoko Ono and godson of Elton John, shares birthday with his deceased father
1978 ● Nicholas Byrne → Vocals for Irish pop boy band Westlife, “Swear It Again” (#20, 2000) and 17 UK Top 10 hits
1979 ● Alex Greenwald → Actor, model for The Gap clothing store and lead vocals and guitarist for power pop/indie rock Phantom Planet, “California” (Modern Rock #35, 2002)
1980 ● Brian Hurren → Keyboards for Scottish Celtic folk-rock Runrig, “An Ubhal As Airde (The Highest Apple)” (UK #18, 1995)

October 10

1909 ● “Mother” Maybelle Carter → Guitar, harmony vocals and 50-year member of traditional folk and country music act The Carter Family, matriarch of next-generation country-pop The Carter Sisters (“Pick The Wildwood Flower,” Country #34, 1973) with daughters Helen, June (later June Carter Cash) and Anita, performed until her death on 10/24/1978, age 69
1914 ● Ivory Joe Hunter → The “Baron of the Boogie”, blues pianist, singer and early rock ‘n’ roller, “Since I Met You, Baby” (#12, R&B #1, 1956), died of lung cancer on 11/8/1974, age 60
1917 ● Thelonius Monk → Jazz giant, pianist and composer, “Round Midnight” (1944) and the retrospective live album At Carnegie Hall (#107, 2005), died after a stroke on 2/17/1982, age 64
1923 ● Louis Gottlieb → Baritone vocals, bass guitar and comic routines for folk-pop trio The Limeliters, “A Dollar Down” (#60, 1961), left the group in 1965 to co-found the hippie commune Morning Star Ranch in Sonoma County, CA, rejoined in 1973 and performed through to his death on 7/11/1996, age 72
1938 ● Larry Finnegan (John Lawrence Finneran) → One hit wonder rock ‘n’ roll/pop singer, “Dear One” (#11, AUS #1, 1962), left the U.S. for Sweden and then Switzerland in the mid-60s, returned to the U.S. in the early 70s and died of a brain tumor on 7/22/1973, age 34
1943 ● Denis D’Ell (Dalziel) → Lead singer and harmonica player for one hit wonder English beat/pop-rock The Honeycombs, “Have I The Right?” (#5, 1964), died of cancer on 7/6/2005, age 61
1945 ● Alan Cartwright → Bassist for prog/psych rock Procol Harum, “A Whiter Shade Of Pale” (#5, 1967), left in 1975, now operates a pub
1945 ● Jerry Lacroix → Journeyman harmonica, saxophone, songwriter and backing vocals for The Boogie Kings, Edgar Winter’s White Trash, Blood, Sweat & Tears and Rare Earth, sessions
1946 ● John Prine → Influential folk-country-rock singer, songwriter and guitarist, albums Sweet Revenge (#135, 1973) and Grammy-winning Fair & Square (#55, 2005) and the oft-covered country-folk standard “Angel From Montgomery” (1971)
1948 ● Cyril Neville → Vocals and percussion in New Orleans soul-funk sibling group The Neville Brothers, “Yellow Moon” (1989)
1951 ● Keith Grimes → Backing band guitarist for Eva Cassidy, mixed-genre vocal interpreter of American classics and pop tunes including “Over The Rainbow” (1992)
1952 ● Sharon Osbourne → Sensible wife of heavy metal king Ozzy Osbourne, TV actress and judge on The X Factor and America’s Got Talent, producer, business manager and promoter
1953 ● James “Midge” Ure → Scottish guitarist, singer and songwriter, first with bubblegum pop Slik, “Forever And Ever” (UK #1, 1976), left to form pop-rock The Rich Kids, “Rich Kids” (UK #24, 1978), then New Wave electro-synth-pop pioneers Ultravox, “Vienna” (UK #2, 1980) and 15 other UK Top 40 singles, co-organized charity group Band Aid, “Do They Know It’s Christmas” (#13, 1984), solo, “Dear God” (Mainstream Rock #6, 1989)
1954 ● David Lee Roth → Flamboyant frontman, lead singer and songwriter for hard rock Van Halen, “Jump” (#1, 1984), solo, “Just Like Paradise” (#6, 1988), radio “shock jock” DJ with Howard Stern
1958 ● Tanya Tucker → Country singer and songwriter, first hit at age 13 with “Delta Dawn” (#72, Country #6, 1972), scored 10 Country #1 hits including “Lizzie And The Rainman” (#37, Country #1, 1975), 1991 Country Music Association singer of the year, starred in her own fly-on-the-wall TV show, Tuckerville, in 2005
1959 ● Kirsty MacColl → Brit singer and songwriter, “There’s A Guy Works Down In The Chip Shop (Swears He’s Elvis)” (UK #14, 1981) and “Walking Down Madison” (Dance/Club #18, 1991), died in a boating accident in Mexico on 12/18/2000, age 41
1960 ● Eric Martin → Vocals for pop-metal “shredder” band Mr. Big, “To Be With You” (#1, 1992)
1960 ● Gail Greenwood → Bass guitarist in alt rock Belly (“Feed The Tree,” #95, Alt Rock #1, UK #32, 1993) and grunge and riot grrrl L7 (“Pretend We’re Dead,” Alt Rock #8, UK #21, 1992), since 2003 with alt rock Benny Sizzler
1961 ● Martin Kemp → Bassist for New Romantic pop-rock Spandau Ballet, “True” (#4, 1983)
1963 ● Jim Glennie → Bassist in Brit alt pop-rock James, “Sit Down” (UK #2, 1991) and “Laid” (#61, Modern Rock #3, 1994)
1963 ● Jonny Male → Guitarist for techno-pop Republica, “Drop Dead Gorgeous” (Modern Rock #39, 1997)
1964 ● Graham Crabb → Drummer for dance-rock Pop Will Eat Itself, “X, Y & Zee” (Modern Rock #11, 1991)
1967 ● Mike Malinin → Guitar and vocals for alt-rock Goo Goo Dolls, “Iris” (#1, 1998)
1972 ● Vinnie Tattanelli → Drummer for power-pop Nine Days, “Absolutely (Story Of A Girl)” (#6, 2000)
1973 ● Scott Morriss → Bassist for indie rock The Bluetones, “Slight Return” (UK #2, 1996)
1979 ● Mýa Marie Harrison → R&B/smooth urban soul singer, “Case Of The Ex” (#2, 2000) and “Lady Marmalade” (#1, 2001) with Christina Aguilera, Lil’ Kim and Pink, dancer and actress
1981 ● Una Healy Foden → Vocals in electro-pop girl-group The Saturdays, “Missing You” (UK #3, 2010) and twelve other UK Top 10 hits

October 11

1919 ● Art Blakey → Grammy-winning jazz drummer and bandleader, played in various 40s big bands, in the 50s formed his own band, the influential and archetypical hard bop Jazz Messengers, led multiple lineups of the band and recorded his own solo albums until his death from lung cancer on 10/16/1990, age 71
1932 ● Dottie West (Dorothy Marie Marsh) → Influential, top-tier country music singer and songwriter with 18 Country Top 20 singles, including “A Lesson In Leaving” (#73, AC #42, Country #1, 1980) plus four Country Top 5 duets with Kenny Rogers, similar to mentor Patsy Cline faced respect issues in a male-dominated Nashville scene, financial problems plagued her during declining popularity in the 80s, sustained injuries in a roll-over car accident on her way to a comeback performance at the Grand Old Opry and died during surgery five days later on 9/4/1991, age 58
1946 ● Gary Mallaber → Drummer with blues-rock then psych-rock then pop-rock Steve Miller Band, “The Joker” (#1, 1973), then session work for dozens of artists, including Peter Frampton, Poco, Van Morrison and Bonnie Raitt
1946 ● Daryl Hall (Hohl) → Singer/songwriter and one half of Philly soul-pop-rock duo Hall & Oates, “Private Eyes” (#1, 1981), plus 20 other Top 20 hits
1950 ● Andrew Woolfolk → Saxophonist for R&B/soul-dance-pop Earth, Wind & Fire, “Shining Star” (#1, 1975)
1957 ● Chris Joyce → Drummer and co-founder of Brit soul-pop Simply Red, “Holding Back The Years” (#1, 1986)
1957 ● Blair Cunningham → Drummer for New Wave funk-pop Haircut 100, “Love Plus One” (#37, 1982)
1958 ● Tony Moore → Brit singer/songwriter, musician, radio personality and music promoter who was briefly keyboardist for heavy metal Iron Maiden and later with New Wave pop-rock Cutting Crew, “(I Just) Died In Your Arms” (#1, 1987), founded new music nightclub The Kashmir Klub in 1997 and currently manages other London music venues
1962 ● Andy McCoy (Antti Hulkko) → Guitarist for Finnish glam-punk-metal Hanoi Rocks, covered Creedence Clearwater Revival‘s “Up Around The Bend” (UK #61, 1984)
1962 ● Scott Johnson → Vocals and guitar for power-pop Gin Blossoms, “Found Out About You” (Modern Rock #1, 1994)
1971 ● MC Lyte (Lana Michele Moorer) → Rapper, “Cold Rock A Party” (#11, Rap #1, 1997), first female to release a full rap album (Lyte As A Rock, 1988), sometime TV actress
1973 ● Brendan Brown → Vocals and guitar for post-grunge Wheatus, “Teenage Dirtbag” (Modern Rock #7, 2001)

October 12

1927 ● Joe Olivier → Guitarist with early and important rock ‘n’ roll group Bill Haley & His Comets, “Rock Around The Clock” (#1, 1955)
1929 ● Nappy Brown (Napoleon Brown Goodson Culp) → R&B/gospel, blues and early rock ‘n’ roll-era singer and songwriter with a distinctive sing-song, added consonants delivery and several hits in the 50s, including “Don’t Be Angry” (#25, R&B #2, 1955), faded by 1960 but enjoyed a career revival in the 80s, died in his sleep on 9/20/2008, age 78
1935 ● Luciano Pavarotti → Highly successful and widely-admired Italian opera star and pop music singer, performed on Saturday Night Live and sang with U2 on “Miss Sarajevo”, died from pancreatic cancer on 9/6/1977, age 71
1935 ● Sam Moore (Samuel David Hicks) → Tenor vocals and one half of R&B/soul Sam & Dave, “Soul Man” (#2, 1967), the most successful and critically-acclaimed soul music duo of all time
1942 ● Melvin Franklin → Bass vocals for Motown R&B/soul legends The Temptations, “My Girl” (#1, 1965) and Grammy-winning “Papa Was A Rolling Stone” (#1, 1972), died after a coma-inducing seizure on 2/23/1995, age 52
1948 ● Rick Parfitt → Vocals and rhythm guitar for Brit psych-boogie rock Status Quo, “Pictures Of Matchstick Men” (#12, 1968)
1955 ● Jane Siberry → Canadian art-pop-rock singer and songwriter, “One More Colour” (Canada #27, 1985) from the album The Speckless Sky (#149, 1986)
1955 ● Pat DiNizio → Lead singer, guitarist and songwriter for alt pop-rock The Smithereens, “Only A Memory” (Mainstream Rock #1, 1988), solo albums plus XM satellite radio programmer and unsuccessful US Senate candidate
1956 ● Dave Vanian (David Letts) → Singer and founding member of first-wave punk rockers The Damned, “Eloise” (UK #3, 1986), solo, now hosts TV show featuring homemade horror movies contributed by viewers
1966 ● Brian Kennedy → Irish singer/songwriter, played in Van Morrison band, solo, “Life, Love And Happiness”, (UK #27, 1996), appeared on Broadway in The River Dance
1969 ● Martie Ervin Seidel Maguire → Multi-instrumentalist singer and songwriter with country-rock girl group Dixie Chicks, “Not Ready To Make Nice” (#4, 2006)
1979 ● Jordan Pundik → Founding member, lyricist and lead vocals for pop-punk New Found Glory, “My Friends Over You” (Alt Rock #5, 2002)

October 13

1937 ● Bruce “Cousin Brucie” Morrow (Bruce Meyerowitz) → Beloved 60s and 70s pop-rock Top 40 radio DJ (WABC-am New York), then media businessman and currently Sirius XM satellite radio host
1940 ● Chris Farlowe (John Henry Deighton) → Rock, blues and blue-eyed soul singer, covered the Jagger/Richards song, “Out of Time” (UK #1, 1966), session work for Colosseum, Atomic Rooster, Jimmy Page and others
1941 ● Paul Simon → Highly acclaimed and ten-time Grammy-winning folk-pop-rock singer, songwriter and guitarist, one half the 60 folk-pop duo Simon & Garfunkel, “Bridge Over Trouble Water” (#1, 1970), solo, “50 Ways To Leave Your Lover” (#1, 1975) and 12 other Top 40 hits plus the 1986 Grammy Album of the Year, Graceland (#3, 1987)
1944 ● Robert Lamm → Founding member, vocals, keyboards and songwriter for horn-pop-rock Chicago, wrote “25 Or 6 To 4” (#4, 1970) and “Saturday In The Park” (#3, 1972), solo with seven albums plus a 2000 collaboration album with Gerry Beckley (America) and Carl Wilson (The Beach Boys)
1947 ● Sammy Hagar → Hard rock guitarist and lead singer with early heavy metal band Montrose, “Bad Motor Scooter” (1973), solo, “Your Love Is Driving Me Crazy” (#13, 1983), replaced David Lee Roth in Van Halen, “When It’s Love” (#5, 1988), resumed solo career in 1995
1948 ● Peter David Spencer → Drums and vocals for pop-rock Smokie, “Living Next Door To Alice” (#25, 1977)
1948 ● John Ford Coley (John Edward Colley) → Guitar and vocals in folk-pop duo England Dan & John Ford Coley, “I’d Really Love To See You Tonight” (#2, 1976)
1950 ● Simon Nicol → Guitarist for renowned Brit folk-rock Fairport Convention, “Si Tu Dos Partir” (UK #21, 1969)
1959 ● Gerry Darby → Founding member and drummer for Brit jazz-pop-rock Carmel, “Bad Day” (UK #15, 1983)
1959 ● Marie Osmond → Youngest sibling of family-oriented light pop-rock The Osmonds, ten US Top 40 singles including “One Bad Apple” (#1, 1971), country-pop solo career, “Paper Roses” (#5, Country #1, 1973) and seven other Country Top 40 hits, TV host
1962 ● Rob Marche → Guitarist for dance-pop-rock Jo Boxers, “Boxer Beat” (UK #3, 1983)
1968 ● Carlos Marin → Baritone for pre-fab Euro-pop vocal quartet Il Divo, “Unbreak My Heart” (Adult Contemporary #33, 2005)
1970 ● Paul Potts → Welsh crossover opera singer and winner of the first series of ITV’s Britain’s Got Talent, debut album One Chance (#21, UK #1, 2007)
1977 ● Justin Peroff (Papadimitriou) → Canadian drummer for jazz/pop/rock Broken Social Scene, “1 2 3 4” (UK #4, 2007), TV and film actor
1980 ● Ashanti Shequoiya Douglas → R&B/contemporary urban singer, songwriter, dancer and actress, “Foolish” (#1, 2002)
1981 ● Kelechukwu “Kele” Rowland Okereke → Lead singer and rhythm guitarist for indie pop-punk revival Bloc Party, “Helicopter” (Dance #5, 2006), solo

October 14

1926 ● Bill Justis → Record company music director, arranger and film score composer (Smokey And The Bandit, 1977), co-wrote and played saxophone on his one hit wonder pioneer instrumental rock n’ roll song “Raunchy” (#2, 1957), died of cancer on 7/15/1982, age 55
1930 ● Robert Parker → New Orleans R&B/soul and rock ‘n’ roll singer and saxophonist, sessions for Fats Domino, Ernie K-Doe and others, then one hit wonder solo career, “Barefootin'” (#7, 1966)
1940 ● Cliff Richard (Harry Rodger Webb) → The “Brit Elvis” and biggest selling artist of all time in the UK, early rock n’ roll star, “Move It” (UK #2, 1958) credited as the first rock ‘n’ roll song from outside the U.S., then migrated to MOR pop and light rock, “Devil Woman” (#6, UK #9, 1976) plus over 100 UK Top 40 hits, TV actor
1942 ● Billy Harrison → Backing vocals and guitar for the early lineups of Irish garage-rock, proto-punk Them, “Gloria” (#71, 1966)
1945 ● Colin “Bomber” Hodgkinson → Jazz-rock bassist, co-founded 70s bass-centric fusion trio Back Door, session work for Jan Hammer, Alexis Korner, the Spencer Davis Group, Whitesnake and others
1946 ● Dan McCafferty → Founding member and lead singer of Scottish hard rock Nazareth, “Love Hurts” (#8, 1976), has appeared on all Nazareth albums plus two solo LPs
1946 ● David Justin Hayward → Guitar and vocals for prog rock then pop-rock The Moody Blues, wrote “Nights In White Satin” (#2, 1967) and “Your Wildest Dreams” (#9, 1986), still touring in 2011
1947 ● Norman Harris → R&B/Philly soul guitarist, founding member of MFSB, producer for multiple R&B/soul groups including The Delfonics and The Trammps, co-wrote hits for Gloria Gaynor, Wilson Pickett, the Spinners and others as part of the Baker-Harris-Young songwriting team, died of a heart attack on 3/20/1987, age 39
1948 ● Ivory Tilmon → Vocals in R&B/soul brother act The Detroit Emeralds, “Feel The Need In Me” (R&B #22, 1973)
1948 ● Marcia Barrett → West Indian vocalist in R&B/disco Euro-dance Boney M, “Rivers Of Babylon” (#30, UK #1, 1978)
1952 ● Chris Amoo → Vocals for Brit Northern soul/funk quartet The Real Thing, “You To Me Are Everything” (#64, UK #1, 1976)
1958 ● Thomas Dolby (Thomas Morgan Robertson) → Multi-instrumentalist New Wave synth-pop singer and composer, “She Blinded Me With Science” (#5, 1982), also member of Camera Club and the Lene Lovich band, producer for Joni Mitchell, Prefab Sprout and others, developed the RMF downloadable file format and Beatnik mobile phone software
1959 ● Anthony Jude “A.J.” Pero → Drummer for heavy metal Twisted Sister, “We’re Not Gonna Take It” (#21, 1983), continued to perform with the band until his death from a heart attack on 3/20/2015, age 55
1959 ● Antimo Rivetti → Manager for Brit teen-pop blue-eyed soul Curiosity Killed The Cat, “Down To Earth” (UK #3, 1986)
1965 ● Karyn White → Contemporary R&B/pop singer, “Superwoman” (#8, 1988), now an interior design and real estate consultant
1974 ● Natalie Maines Pasdar → Singer, songwriter and guitarist for country-rock girl group Dixie Chicks, “Not Ready To Make Nice” (#4, 2006) plus Grammy Album of the Year Taking The Long Way (2006)
1975 ● Shaznay Lewis → Singer in Brit dance-pop-rock all-girl quartet All Saints, “Never Ever” (#4, 1998)
1978 ● Usher Raymond → The reigning “King of R&B,” Grammy-winning pop-soul singer, songwriter, dancer and actor, “Nice & Slow” (#1, 1998) plus 13 other Top 10 singles and three #1 albums

October 15

1925 ● McHouston “Mickey” (aka “Guitar”) Baker → Highly influential but little known 50s session guitarist at Atlantic Records, bridged R&B and rock ‘n’ roll as a backing guitarist, plus solo and duo Mickey & Sylvia, “Love Is Strange” (#11, 1957)
1935 ● Barry McGuire → One hit wonder folk-rock singer, songwriter and guitarist, “Eve Of Destruction” (#1, 1965), switched to Christian/gospel in the 70s
1938 ● Marv Johnson → Early Motown R&B/soul vocalist, “You Got What It Takes” (#10, 1959) and three other Top 40 hits between 1959 and 1961, moved into sales and promotion with Motown and sister labels, died from a stroke on 5/16/1993, age 54
1938 ● Fela Kuti (Olufela Ransome-Kuti) → Nigerian multi-instrumentalist singer, arranger, political activist and pioneer World music artist as inventor of the Afro-beat, used his influence and music to criticize his homeland’s authoritarian regimes while introducing a blend of James Brown funk with jazz and traditional African rhythms, sold millions of records in Africa and elsewhere despite near-constant government repression, died from complications of AIDS on 8/3/1997, age 58
1939 ● Talmadge “Tommy” Gough → Vocals for biracial R&B/doo wop The Crests, “Sixteen Candles” (#2, 1959), quit the group about 1970 and faded into obscurity, died of throat cancer on 8/24/2014. age 74
1942 ● Don Stevenson → Drummer, singer and songwriter for 60s San Francisco folk-roots-psych rock Moby Grape, “Omaha” (#88, 1967), continues to appear with the band, issued his first solo album (King Of The Fools) in 2010
1942 ● Chris Andrews → Pop-rock singer and songwriter, “Yesterday Man” (UK #3, 1965), wrote six UK Top 10 hits for Adam Faith and Sandie Shaw in the mid-60s,
1946 ● Richard Carpenter → Keyboards and vocals with sister Karen in AM pop/adult contemporary duo The Carpenters, “Close To You” (#1, 1970)
1948 ● Joe “Yo Yo” Jaramillo → Founding member and vocals for pioneering “East Side Sound” of L.A. Mexican-American one hit wonder brown-eyed-soul/garage rock quartet Cannibal And The Headhunters (“Land Of A Thousand Dances,” #30, 1965), died from liver disease on 5/24/2000, age 51
1948 ● Lance Dickerson → Drummer for country-rock/boogie/swing bar band Commander Cody And His Lost Planet Airmen, “Hot Rod Lincoln” (#9, 1972), worked with various incarnations of the band through the 90s, died on 11/10/2003, age 55
1948 ● Chris De Burgh (Christopher John Davison) → Light pop-rock/adult contemporary singer, songwriter and keyboardist, “Lady in Red” (#3, 1986)
1951 ● Frank DiMino → Lead vocals for flamboyant, mostly-image glam-rock Angel, a Kiss-wannabe band with eight studio and live albums and a cult following but little commercial success, left in 1981, reunited with several original members in the 90s and currently plays in classic rock cover bands in Las Vegas
1953 ● Toriano “Tito” Jackson → Vocals and lead guitarist in R&B/pop-soul sibling act The Jackson 5, “I Want You Back” (#1, 1970)
1956 ● Chris Lacklison → Keyboards for glam pop-rock Kenny, “The Bump” (UK #3, 1975)
1962 ● David Stead → Drummer in alt pop-rock The Beautiful South, “A Little Time” (UK #1, 1990)
1962 ● Mark Reznicek → Drummer in post-grunge alt rock Toadies, “Possum Kingdom” (Modern Rock #4, 1995)
1963 ● Jay Bennett → Guitarist, songwriter and producer for alt country-rock Wilco, “Outtasite (Outta Mind)” (Mainstream Rock #22, 1997), solo, sessions and collaborations, died from an accidental overdose of painkillers on 5/24/2009, age 45
1966 ● Douglas Vipond → Drummer in Scottish indie pop-rock Deacon Blue, “Real Gone Kid” (UK #8, 1988)
1970 ● Ginuwine (Elgin Baylor Lumpkin) → Hip-hop soul crooner, “Differences” (#4, 2001) and five other Top 40 singles
1984 ● Shayne Ward → Contemporary pop singer and winner of the 2005 UK TV series The X Factor, “That’s My Goal” (UK #1, 2005)

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This Week’s Birthdays (October 2 – 10)

Happy Birthday this week to:

October 02

1933 ● David Somerville → Canadian singer and songwriter, co-founder and original lead singer for pop vocal group The Diamonds, “Little Darlin'” (#2, 1957) and fourteen other Top 40 hits between 1956 and 1961, co-wrote the theme song to TV drama series The Fall Guy (1981-1986) with show producer Glen Larson of The Four Preps, with whom he toured in the 80s, died from cancer on 7/14/2015, age 81
1935 ● René Herrera → Mexican-American singer and, with René Ornelas, one half of the Tejano-pop duo René y René with two minor 60s hits, “Angelito” (“Little Angel”) (#43, 1964) and “Lo Mucho Que Te Quiero (The More I Love You)” (AC #14, 1969), one of the first Chicano acts on American Bandstand in 1964, retired in 1969 for a career in banking, died from cancer on 12/20/2005, age 70
1938 ● Nick Gravenites → Blues, rock and folk guitarist, vocalist, songwriter and producer, worked with Quicksilver Messenger Service and Janis Joplin‘s Kozmic Blues Band, joined The Butterfield Blues Band and founded blues-rock Electric Flag with Mike Bloomfield, wrote the score to the film The Trip (1967) and produced the music to the film Steelyard Blues (1973), inducted into the Blues Hall of Fame in 2003
1939 ● Candido “Lolly” Vasquez-Vegas → With brother Patrick, co-founder, guitar and vocals for Native American rockers Redbone, “Come And Get Your Love” (#5, 1974), died 3/4/2010, age 70
1941 ● Ron Meagher → Co-founder and bassist in pop-rock The Beau Brummels, “Laugh, Laugh” (#15, 1964)
1945 ● Don McLean → Folk-rock singer/songwriter best known for his 8 minute epic, “American Pie” (#1, 1971), the song inspired by and a tribute to the death of Buddy Holly
1946 ● Ron Griffiths → Bassist, vocals and songwriter for power pop quartet The Iveys, “Maybe Tomorrow” (#67, 1968), left before the band changed its name and became Badfinger
1947 ● Frank “Skip” Konte → Record producer, movie score writer and pop-rock keyboardist, joined The Blues Image in 1967 and co-wrote “Ride Captain Ride” (#4, 1970), left in 1973 to join pop-rock Three Dog Night (“Joy To The World,” #1, 1971), formed KonteMedia and produced the sci-fi movie Meridian in 2010
1949 ● Richard Hell (Meyers) → Bassist, singer and songwriter, one of the original New York punk rockers, co-founded punk-rock Television, then fronted The Voidoids, “Blank Generation” (1977), now an author
1950 ● Mike Rutherford → Bass, backing vocals and one of two constant members of prog-rock turned pop-rock Genesis, “Invisible Touch” (#1, 1986), fronts side project Mike + The Mechanics, “All I Need Is A Miracle” (#5, 1986)
1951 ● Sting (Gordon Matthew Sumner) → Lead vocals, bass guitar and songwriter for post-punk The Police, “Every Breath You Take” (#1, 1983), then highly successful solo career, “Fortress Around Your Heart” (#1, 1985) and five other Top 20 hits and 11 Grammy Awards
1952 ● John Otway → Novelty folk-rock cult singer/songwriter, “Really Free” (UK #27, 1977) with Wild Willy Barrett and “Bunsen Burner” (UK #9, 2002)
1955 ● Philip Oakey → Vocals for late-70s synth-pop pioneers The Human League, “Don’t You Want Me” (#1, 1981)
1956 ● Freddie Jackson → R&B/urban soul balladeer, “You Are My Lady” (#12, R&B #1, 1985) and nine other R&B #1 hits
1958 ● Robbie Nevil → Songwriter, guitarist and pop-rock solo singer, “C’est La Vie” (#2, 1987), producer and writer for Babyface, Jessica Simpson, Destiny’s Child, Smash Mouth and others
1960 ● Al Connelly → Guitarist for Canadian pop-rock Glass Tiger, “Don’t Forget Me (When I’m Gone)” (#2, 1986)
1962 ● Sigtryggur “Siggi” Baldursson → Drummer in Icelandic alt pop-rock The Sugarcubes, “Hit” (Modern Rock #1, 1991)
1962 ● Claude V. McKnight, III → Vocals in a cappella gospel Take 6, “I L-O-V-E U” (R&B #19, 1990)
1967 ● Gillian Welch → Country, bluegrass and light roots-rock singer-songwriter, guitarist and percussionist, released multiple albums with musical partner David Rawlings, including Grammy-nominated The Harrow & The Harvest (#20, Indie Albums #3, 2011)
1967 ● Floyd I. “Bud” Gaugh IV → Drums and percussion for California ska-punk revivalist trio Sublime, “What I Got” (#29, 1997)
1969 ● Badly Drawn Boy (Damon Gough) → Alternative rock singer, songwriter, and multi-instrumentalist, “You Were Right” (UK #9, 2002)
1970 ● Dion Allen → Backing vocals in hip hop/urban rap quintet Az Yet, “Last Night” (#9, R&B #1, 1996)
1971 ● Tiffany Renee Darwish → Late 80s teen queen and bubblegum pop singer, “Could’ve Been” (#1, 1987) and “I Think We’re Alone Now” (#1, 1987)
1973 ● Proof (DeShaun Holton) → Detroit rapper, high school chum of Eminem and member with him of the hip hop collective D12 (aka Dirty Dozen), “My Band” (#6, 2004) plus several solo and collaborative projects, died from gunshot wounds at a nightclub shooting on 4/11/2006, age 32
1973 ● Lene Grawford Nystrøm Rasted → Vocals for Danish dance-pop Aqua, “Barbie Girl” (#7, 1997), which drew a lawsuit from Mattel for its sexual content
1973 ● LaTocha Scott → Vocals for female R&B/dance-pop quartet Xscape, “Understanding” (#8, 1993)

October 03

1938 ● Eddie Cochran → Pioneering rockabilly singer, songwriter, influential power chord guitarist and up-and-coming rock star, “Summertime Blues” (#8, 1958) and two other Top 40 hits, died in a car crash while on tour in England on 4/17/1960, age 21
1940 ● Alan O’Day → One hit wonder pop rock singer, “Undercover Agent” (#1, UK #43, 1977), also wrote hit songs for Helen Reddy (“Angie Baby,” #1, 1974) and co-wrote The Righteous Brothers (“Rock And Roll Heaven,” #3, 1974), turned to TV in the 80s and co-wrote over 100 songs for the Muppet Babes series, died from brain cancer on 5/17/2013, age 72
1941 ● Chubby Checker (Ernest Evans) → Grammy-winning R&B/pop singer and early 60s dance-craze instigator, “The Twist” (#1, 1960 and 1962), the only song to hit #1 in the US singles charts twice, plus 17 other Top 40 hits
1941 ● Lenny Waronker → Record producer and former CEO of Warner Bros. Records, worked with Maria Muldaur, Gordon Lightfoot, Randy Newman, The Doobie Brothers and multiple other 70s rock bands, partner with DreamWorks development team
1945 ● Antonio Martinez → Guitarist for Spanish rock ‘n roll band Los Bravos, “Black Is Black” (US #4, 1966), the first US Top 10 hit by a Spanish band
1946 ● P. P. Arnold → L.A.-born gospel and R&B/soul singer recruited from motherhood to the Ike & Tina Turner Revue in 1964, left the band for a London-based solo career including a Mick Jagger produced debit album, The First Lady Of Immediate (1967) and several UK-only cover hits plus backing work with the Small Faces, Humble Pie, Eric Clapton, Peter Gabriel and others into the 00s
1947 ● Ben Cauley → Trumpet player and founding member of soul/funk The Bar-Kays, “Soul Finger” (#17, R&B #3, 1967), which also served as Stax Records‘ in-house session group and Otis Redding‘s backing band, survived the December 1967 plane crash that killed Redding and four bandmates, reformed the The Bar-Kays and backed Isaac Hayes on his landmark album, Hot Buttered Soul (1969), continued to perform until his death on 9/21/2015 , age 68
1949 ● Lindsey Buckingham → Guitar, vocals and songwriter for pop duo Buckingham Nicks, joined pop-rock Fleetwood Mac in 1974, wrote “Go Your Own Way” (#10, 1977), then solo, “Trouble” (#9, 1981), producer
1950 ● Ronnie Laws → Jazz, blues and funk saxophonist and singer, first with R&B/soul-dance-pop Earth, Wind & Fire, “Shining Star” (#1, 1975), then solo, “Every Generation” (R&B #12, 1980), sessions for Ramsey Lewis, Hugh Masekela, Sister Sledge and others
1954 ● Stevie Ray Vaughan → Grammy-winning Texas blues-rock guitar master, “Crossfire” (Mainstream Rock #1, 1983), died in a helicopter crash following a show in Wisconsin on 8/27/1990, age 35
1961 ● Robbie Jaymes → Keyboards for Brit dance-pop band Modern Romance, “Can You Move” (Dance/Club #2, 1981) and “Best Years Of Our Lives” (UK #4, 1982)
1962 ● Tommy Lee (Bass) → Drummer in hair-metal Mötley Crüe, “Dr. Feelgood” (#6, 1989), founded rap-metal band Methods of Mayhem, “Get Naked” (2000) and other solo work, former spouse of actresses Heather Locklear and Pamela Anderson
1965 ● Neil Sims → Drummer for Brit indie rock/shoegazing band Catherine Wheel, “Black Metallic” (Modern Rock #9, 1991)
1966 ● Dan Miller → Guitarist for at pop-rock They Might Be Giants, “Birdhouse In Your Soul” (#3, Modern Rock, 1990)
1967 ● Chris Collingwood → Singer, songwriter, rhythm guitarist and founding member of power pop band Fountains Of Wayne, “Stacy’s Mom” (#21, 2003)
1969 ● Gwen Stefani → Lead vocals for rock/ska No Doubt, “Underneath It All” (#3, 2002), then solo, “Hollaback Girl” (#1, 2005) from the 2004 worldwide Top 10 album Love, Angel, Music, Baby, fashion designer
1971 ● Kevin Richardson → Vocals in pop-dance-hip hop Backstreet Boys, “Quit Playing Games With My Heart” (#2, 1997)
1975 ● India.Aire Simpson → Grammy-winning neo-classic R&B/soul singer and songwriter, “Little Things” (Song of the Year, 2000)
1978 ● Jake Shears (Jason Sellards) → Vocals dance-glam-rock Scissor Sisters, “Filthy Gorgeous” (Dance/Club #1, 2005)
1979 ● Nate Wood → Drums, percussion and backing vocals for post-grunge alt rock The Calling, “Wherever You Will Go” (#5, 2001)
1983 ● Danny O’Donoghue → Irish singer, songwriter and multi-instrumentalist in teen-pop boy band Mytown, “Body Bumpin'” (Canada #12, 2000) then Celtic folk-pop-rock The Script, “Breakeven” (#12, 2010)
1969 ● Gwen Stefani → Lead vocals for rock/ska No Doubt, “Underneath It All” (#3, 2002), then solo, “Hollaback Girl” (#1, 2005) from the 2004 worldwide Top 10 album Love, Angel, Music, Baby, fashion designer

October 04

1929 ● Leroy Van Dyke → Country-pop singer, songwriter and guitarist, “Walk On By” (#5, Country #1, 1961), named by Billboard magazine as the most popular country song of all time
1937 ● Pirkle Lee Moses, Jr. → Lead vocals for Chicago doo wop The El Dorados, “At My Front Door” (#17, R&B #1, 1955), fronted various incarnations of the group until his death on 12/6/2000, age 63
1944 ● Marlena Davis → Vocals in mixed gender R&B doo-wop quartet The Orlons, “The Wah-Watusi” (#2, R&B #5, 1962), left the group in late 1963 for a career as an executive secretary, died from lung cancer on 2/25/1993, age 48
1947 ● Jim Fielder → Bassist for jazz-rock/pop-rock fusion band Blood, Sweat & Tears, “Spinning Wheel” (#2, 1969), sessions
1952 ● Jody Stevens → Drummer and last surviving original member of power pop cult band Big Star, “September Gurls” (1974, Rolling Stone #178), currently a studio engineer
1957 ● Barbara K. MacDonald (Kooyman) → With then-husband Pat MacDonald, one half of one hit wonder alt country-folk-pop duo Timbuk 3, “The Future’s So Bright, I Gotta Wear Shades” (#19, 1986), following divorce in 1995 pursued a solo music career mixed with social activism
1959 ● Chris Lowe → Keyboards for synth-pop dance Pet Shop Boys, “West End Girls” (#1, 1986)
1961 ● Juan “Jon” Secada → Cuban-American R&B and pop singer and songwriter, “Just Another Day” (#5, 1992), two albums have won Grammy Awards for Best Latin Pop Performance
1965 ● Leo Barnes → Saxophone for Irish rockers Hothouse Flowers, “Don’t Go” (Modern Rock #7, 1988)
1977 ● Richard Reed Parry → Multi-instrumentalist member of Grammy-winning Canadian alt/indie rock Arcade Fire, “Keep The Car Running” (Alt #32, 2007)
1984 ● Lena Katina (Elena Sergeevna Katina) → Singer in Russian teen pop duo t.A.T.u., “All The Things She Said” (#20, UK #1, 2003), solo

October 05

1907 ● Mrs. Miller (Elva Ruby Connes) → Undeniably unique, improbably humorous and oddly catchy novelty pop singer with an off-key, warbling, faux-operatic delivery on renditions of light pop, jazz and easy listening hits, including “Yellow Submarine,” “The Girl From Ipanema” and “These Boots Are Made For Walking,” scored two Top 100 hits and a Top 20 album (Mrs. Miller’s Greatest Hits, #15, 1966) before disappearing into obscurity the early 70s, died on 7/5/1997, age 89
1911 ● Maxine King (Maxine Elliott Driggs Thomas) → Vocalist for complex and sophisticated four-part harmony 30s, 40s and 50s Big Band/pop sibling singing group The King Sisters, “The Hut-Sut Song” (Top 30, 1944), recorded with her sisters on hundreds of albums and numerous radio specials over three decades and in the musical-variety TV program The King Family Show and holiday specials thereafter, died from natural causes at age 92 on 5/13/2009, age 97
1924 ● Bill Dana (William Szathmary) → TV actor, comedian and screenwriter, created the character José Jiménez and the comedy single “The Astronaut” (Top 20, 1961)
1935 ● Margie Singleton (Margaret Louis Ebey) → Popular country duet and solo singer, “Keeping Up With The Joneses” (Country #5, 1964) and four other Country Top 20 hits
1936 ● George “Wydell” Jones Jr. → Lead vocals and songwriter for doo-wop The Edsels, “Rama Lama Ding Dong” (#21, 1961), died from cancer on 9/27/2008, age 71
1937 ● Carlo Mastrangelo → Bass and later lead vocals for R&B doo wop Dion & The Belmonts, “A Teenager In Love” (#5, 1959), continued after frontman Dion DiMucci left in 1960 as The Belmonts, “Tell Me Why” (#18, 1961), performed with the group until just prior to his death from cancer on 4/4/2016, age 78
1939 ● Abi Ofarim (Abraham Reichstadt) → Israeli guitarist, vocalist and dancer, one half the folk-pop-rock husband/wife duo Esther & Abi, “Cinderella Rockafella” (UK #1, 1968)
1941 ● Arlene Smith → Vocals for early R&B/pop girl group trio The Chantels, “Maybe” (#15, R&B #2, 1958), one of the definitive songs of the genre
1941 ● Wally Lester → Vocals in R&B doo wop The Skyliners, “Since I Don’t Have You” (#12, 1959)
1942 ● Richard Street → Lead vocals from 1971 to 1993 for Motown R&B/soul legends The Temptations, Grammy-winning “Papa Was a Rolling Stone” (#1, 1972), his unfinished autobiography was published after his death from a pulmonary embolism on 2/27/2013, age 70
1943 ● Steve Miller → Guitarist, singer, songwriter and frontman for blues-rock then psych-rock then pop-rock Steve Miller Band, “The Joker” (#1, 1973), now teaches college music courses
1945 ● Brian Connolly → Vocals for glam pop-rock Sweet, “Ballroom Blitz” (#5, 1973), died of kidney and liver failure after years of alcoholism on 2/10/1997, age 51
1947 ● Brian Johnson → Lead vocals for Brit glam-rock Geordie, “All Because Of You” (UK #6, 1972), joined AC/DC replacing deceased lead singer Bon Scott in 1980, “Back In Black” (#37, 1981)
1948 ● Carter Cornelius → Singer, musician and member of sibling R&B/soul-pop Cornelius Brothers & Sister Rose, “Treat Her Like A Lady” (#3, R&B #20, 1971) and “Too Late To Turn Back Now” (#2, R&B #5, 1972) and seven other charting hits in the mid-70s, went into seclusion with a religious sect in the late 70s and died from a heart attack on 11/7/1991 , age 43
1948 ● Lucius “Tawl” Ross → Rhythm guitar for R&B/funk giants Funkadelic, “One Nation Under A Groove” (#28, 1978)
1949 ● Louis Charles “B. W.” Stevenson III → One hit wonder country-pop singer, “My Maria” (#9, 1973), died during heart valve surgery on 4/28/1988, age 38
1950 ● “Fast” Eddie Clarke → Guitar and vocals in speed-metal Motörhead, “Ace Of Spades” (UK #15, 1980), left the band in 1982 to co-found heavy metal Fastway
1951 ● Bob Geldof → Frontman, guitar, singer and songwriter for Irish New Wave punk-pop Boomtown Rats, “I Don’t Like Mondays” (#73, UK #1, 1980) plus 8 other UK Top 20 hits, Live Aid founder/promoter, author, and political activist
1952 ● Harold Faltermeyer (Harald Faltermeier) → Grammy-winning German synth-pop keyboardist, producer and composer, co-wrote the themes from the movies Beverly Hills Cop “Axel F” (#3, 1985) and Top Gun, session work with Donna Summer, Barbra Streisand, Billy Idol, Cheap Trick and others
1953 ● Russell Craig Mael → With brother Ron, vocals and frontman for quirky pop-rock Sparks, “This Town Ain’t Big Enough For The Both Of Us” (UK #2, 1974) and “Just Got Back From Heaven” (Dance/Club #7, 1989)
1957 ● Lee Thompson → Sax and vocals for punk/ska revival Madness, “Our House” (#7, 1982) and over 20 other UK Top 40 singles
1960 ● Paul Heard → Keyboards and programming for Brit dance-pop/house music M People, “Moving On Up” (#34, Dance #1, 1993)
1964 ● Dave Dederer → Co-founder, bass and vocals for post-grunge alt rock The Presidents Of The United States Of America, “Lump” (Mainstream Rock #7, 1995), later with web/mobile media company Melodeo
1974 ● Heather Headley → Trinidadian R&B/soul, calypso, reggae and soca singer, “In My Mind” (Dance/Club #1, 2006), Broadway stage actress, The Lion King (1997) and Aida (1998)
1977 ● Kele Le Roc (Kelly Biggs) → Brit pop, garage and R&B/soul singer, “Little Bit Of Lovin'” (UK #8, 1998), backing vocals for Shy FX and Curtis Lynch, Jr.
1978 ● James Valentine → Guitarist for alt funk-rock Maroon 5, “She Will Be Loved” (#5, 2004)
1980 ● Paul Anthony Thomas → Bass guitar for post-grunge punk-pop Good Charlotte, “The Anthem” (Alt Rock #10, 2003)
1985 ● Nicola Roberts → Singer in pre-fab all-girl Euro-pop vocal group Girls Aloud, “Sound Of The Underground” (UK #1, 2002)

October 06

1917 ● Bob Neal → Memphis country and pop radio DJ, music talent agent, Elvis Presley‘s second manager, resigned in favor of Colonel Tom Parker in early 1955
1940 ● Gerald E. “Jerry” Heller → Music impresario best known for managing early rap stars N.W.A. and introducing gangsta rap to a mainstream audience, co-founded Ruthless Records with rapper Eazy-E in 1987, N.W.A. and the label eventually fell into acrimony that continued up to his lawsuit against NBC Universal and others for the negative portrayal of his character in the film Straight Outta Compton (2015) about N.W.A. and the rise of rap music, died after a heart attack on 9/2/2016, age 75
1942 ● Neil Korner → Bassist for British Invasion pop-rock The Nashville Teens, “Tobacco Road” (#16, 1964)
1945 ● Robin Shaw (Scrimshaw) → Session vocalist recruited to pre-fab British Invasion pop-rock The Flower Pot Men, “Let’s Go To San Francisco” (Top 10, 1967), then moved over to pre-fab pop White Plains, “My Baby Loves Lovin'” (#13, 1970) and later pop-rock The First Class, “Beach Baby” (#4, UK #13, 1974)
1946 ● Millie Small → Jamaican one hit wonder “bluebeat” reggae/ska singer, “My Boy Lollipop” (#2, 1964), the first international ska hit
1949 ● Roberto Alfonso “Bobby” Farrell → West Indian vocalist in R&B/disco Euro-dance Boney M, “Rivers Of Babylon” (#30, UK #1, 1978), left for a solo career in 1988 and later fronted his own version of the band, Bobby Farrell’s Boney M, died in his sleep from a heart attack on 12/30/2010, age 61
1949 ● Thomas McClary → Guitarist for Grammy-winning Motown R&B/soul-funk Commodores, “Three Times A Lady” (#1, 1978), left for a solo career in gospel music
1951 ● Gavin Sutherland → Bass guitar and vocals for folk-rock sibling duo The Sutherland Brothers, “(I Don’t Want To Love You But) You Got Me Anyway” (#48, 1973), then joined with an obscure rock band to form The Sutherland Brothers & Quiver, “The Arms Of Mary” (#81, UK #5, 1975)
1951 ● Kevin Cronin → Lead vocals, rhythm guitar and songwriter for arena rock REO Speedwagon, wrote “Keep On Lovin’ You” (#1, 1980) and “Can’t Fight This Feeling” (#1, 1985)
1954 ● David Hidalgo → Singer, songwriter and guitarist for Tex-Mex roots rock Los Lobos, “La Bamba” (#1, 1987), solo, side projects and session work, also member of supergroup Los Super Seven and the Latin Playboys
1958 ● Tim Mooney → Drummer for critically acclaimed but light selling alt pop-rock American Music Club (1991 album Everclear)
1960 ● Richard Jobson → Lead singer in New Wave art-punk-rock The Skids, “Into The Valley” (UK #10, 1979), later producer, TV host, film director and screenwriter
1961 ● Tim Burgess → Drummer for new wave pop-rock T’Pau, “Heart And Soul” (#4, 1987)
1964 ● Matthew Sweet → Power pop guitarist and songwriter, “Girlfriend” (Mainstream Rock #10, 1992), collaborated with The Bangles‘ singer Susanna Hoffs on two albums, Under The Covers, (2006) and Vol. 2 (2009), featuring covers of 60s and 70s pop-rock hits
1966 ● Tommy Stinson → Lead guitar for garage punk then alt rock pioneers The Replacements, “I’ll Be You” (Mainstream Rock #1, 1989), solo, sessions, played with Guns N’ Roses, Soul Asylum, The Old 97’s and others
1982 ● William Pierce Butler → Multi-instrumentalist for Grammy-winning Canadian alt/indie rock Arcade Fire, “Keep The Car Running” (Alt #32, 2007)

October 07

1927 ● Al Martino (Jasper Cini) → Italian-American pop crooner, “I Love You Because” (#3, 1963) and ten other Top 40 hits, film actor, played Johnny Fontane in The Godfather series, died on 10/13/2009, age 82
1939 ● Colin Cooper → Founding member, saxophone, guitar and vocals for Brit blues-rock Climax Blues Band, “Couldn’t Get It Right” (#3, 1977), died on 7/3/2008, age 68
1941 ● Tony “Panama” Silvester → Panama-born founding member and vocalist for R&B/soul The Main Ingredient, “Everybody Plays The Fool” (#3, 1972) and 11 R&B Top 40 singles, died from multiple myeloma on 11/27/2006, age 65
1941 ● Martin Murray → Rhythm guitar for one hit wonder English beat/pop-rock The Honeycombs, “Have I The Right?” (#5, 1964)
1945 ● Bob Webber → Co-founder, keyboards and vocals for one hit wonder pop-rock Sugarloaf, “Green-Eyed Lady” (#3, 1970)
1945 ● Kevin Godley → Drummer, vocals and songwriter for soft pop-rock 10cc, “I’m Not In Love” (#2, 1975), co-founded pop duo Godley & Crème, “Cry” (#16, 1985), later a film and music video director
1949 ● David Hope → Founding member and bassist for prog/heartland rock Kansas, “Dust In The Wind” (#6, 1978), converted to Christianity and formed religious-tinged hard rock AD with other Kansas bandmates, now an Anglican priest and author
1951 ● John (Cougar) Mellencamp → Grammy-winning roots rock singer/songwriter, “Jack And Diane” (#1, 1982) and 23 other Top 40 and 16 Mainstream Rock Top 40 hits
1953 ● Hector Samuel “Tico” Torres → Drummer and percussionist in Bon Jovi, “Living On A Prayer” (#1, 1987)
1959 ● David Taylor → Original bass guitarist for studio-only pop-rock one hit wonder Edison Lighthouse, “(Love Grows) Where My Rosemary Goes” (#5, 1970)
1959 ● Simon Cowell → Record A&R executive, TV producer, music entrepreneur and notoriously critical judge on TV shows Popstars, Pop Idol, American Idol and, starting in 2011, the US version of The X Factor
1964 ● Samantha “Sam” Brown → Brit singer, keyboardist and songwriter, “Stop!” (UK #4, 1989), also backing vocals in sessions and tours with Steve Marriott, The Small Faces, Jools Holland Band, Spandau Ballet and Pink Floyd
1967 ● Toni Braxton → Grammy-winning R&B/soul-pop singer, “Un Break My Heart” (#1, 1996), Broadway stage and film actress, Las Vegas showroom headliner
1968 ● Thomas Edward “Thom” Yorke → Lead vocalist, guitarist and principal songwriter for alt/indie rock Radiohead, “There There” (Modern Rock #14, 2003), solo, “Black Swan” (Mainstream Rock #40, 2006)
1976 ● Taylor Hicks → Blue-eyed soul singer and songwriter, 2006 American Idol winner, “Do I Make You Proud” (#1, 2006)
1978 ● Alesha Dixon → Brit singer, dancer and songwriter in “UK urban” R&B/dance-pop trio Mis-Teeq, “One Night Stand” (Dance/Club #4, 2004), solo, “The Boy Does Nothing” (UK #5, 2008), model

October 08

1932 ● Roddis Franklin “Pete” Drake → Record producer and session peddle steel guitarist, played on numerous albums for a variety of artists, including hits by Lynn Anderson (“Rose Garden,” #3, Country #1, 1970), Bob Dylan (“Lay Lady Lay,” #3, 1969) and others, plus a lone charting hit as a solo artist, “Still” (#22, 1964), produced albums for Ringo Starr and Nashville musicians, died from emphysema on 7/29/1998, age 55
1934 ● Doc Green → Baritone vocals for the second lineup of R&B/soul doo wop The Drifters, “Save The Last Dance For Me” (#1, 1960), left in 1962 and sang with various R&B groups through the 80s, including Vic & The Salutations, died from cancer on 3/10/1989, age 54
1940 ● George Bellamy → Rhythm guitar for Brit instrumental rock ‘n’ roll The Tornados, “Telstar” (#1, 1962), the first major US hit by a British group, solo, father of Muse frontman Matthew Bellamy
1940 ● Fred Cash → Vocals for Chicago soul/doo wop The Impressions, “It’s All Right” (#4, 1963)
1941 ● Dave Arbus → Founding member, violin, flute, saxophone and trumpet in Brit prog-rock/jazz fusion East Of Eden, “Jig A Jig” (UK #7, 1971), later with Fiddler’s Dram, violin solo on The Who‘s “Baba O’Reilly” (1970)
1942 ● Reese Francis “Buzz” Clifford → Rock ‘n roll one hit wonder singer, “Babysittin’ Boogie” (#6, 1961), wrote songs recorded by Petula Clark, Lou Rawls, Leon Russell, Kris Kristofferson and others
1944 ● Susan Raye → Country music singer with 19 Country Top 40 hits between 1969 and 1974, many as duets with mentor Buck Owens, and a lone crossover hit “L.A. International Airport” (#54, Country #9, 1971), dropped out of the industry in the late 70s, returned for two curtain call albums in 1985 and retired for good in 1986
1945 ● Butch Rillera → Drummer for Native American rockers Redbone, “Come And Get Your Love” (#5, 1974)
1945 ● Ray Royer → Guitarist for prog/psych rock Procol Harum, “A Whiter Shade Of Pale” (#5, 1967)
1947 ● Tony Wilson → Bassist in Brit interracial R&B/soul-disco Hot Chocolate, “You Sexy Thing” (#3, 1976) and 27 other UK Top 40 hits, including one in every year from 1970 to 1984
1948 ● Johnny Ramone (John Cummings) → Lead guitar and frontman in seminal punk rock band The Ramones, “Rockaway Beach” (#66, 1978), died of prostate cancer on 9/15/2004, age 55
1949 ● Hamish Stuart → Bass and backing vocals for Scottish blue-eyed soul Average White Band, “Pick Up The Pieces” (#1, 1974), session work for Aretha Franklin, Chaka Khan and others, member of Paul McCartney‘s backing band in the 90s
1949 ● Michael Rosen → Trumpeter for Scottish blue-eyed soul Average White Band, “Pick Up The Pieces” (#1, 1974), sessions
1949 ● Harry Bowens → Vocals for eclectic R&B and rock fusion Was (Not Was), “Walk The Dinosaur” (#7, 1989)
1950 ● Robert “Kool” Bell → Founder, frontman, lead vocals, bass and songwriter for jazz-fusion then R&B/funk Kool & The Gang, “Celebration” (#1, 1980)
1952 ● Cliff Adams → Trombonist for jazz-fusion then R&B/funk Kool & The Gang, “Celebration” (#1, 1980), also played with Patti LaBelle & The Bluebells, The Stylistics and the Duke Ellington Orchestra, died from liver failure on 1/12/2015, age 62
1959 ● James Johnstone (aka MC Large Drink) → Saxophone and guitar for post-punk jazz-funk-rock Pigbag, “Papa’s Got A Brand New Pigbag” (Dance/Club #56, UK #3, 1982)
1963 ● Steve Perry → Co-founder and lead vocals for jazz-rock-ska-swing revival octet Cherry Poppin’ Daddies, “Zoot Suit Riot” (Modern Rock #15, 1998)
1964 ● Priscilla “CeCe” Winans → Grammy-winning R&B/soul and gospel crossover singer in duets with brother BeBe (Benjamin), “Close To You” (R&B/Hip Hop #21, 2009) or solo, “Let Everything That Has Breath” (Dance/Club #8, 2006)
1965 ● C.J. Ramone (Christopher John Ward) → Last bassist for seminal punk rock band The Ramones, “Rockaway Beach” (#66, 1978), replaced original member Dee Dee Ramone in 1986
1967 ● Teddy Riley → Singer, producer, New Jack Swing pioneer, founder and frontman for R&B vocal group Blackstreet, “No Diggity” (#1, 1996), Grammy-winning song featuring Dr. Dre, solo, produced for Michael Jackson, Bobby Brown and others
1968 ● Leeroy Thornhill → MC and vocals for “big beat” electronic dance/rap The Prodigy, “Firestarter” (#30, 1996)
1985 ● Bruno Mars (Peter Gene Hernandez) → Elvis Presley and Michael Jackson impersonator turned contemporary R&B/pop and pop-rap singer, “Just The Way You Are” (#1, 2010)

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