This Week’s Birthdays (November 6 – 12)

Happy Birthday this week to:

November 06

1814 ● Antoine-Joseph “Adolphe” Sax → Belgian musician and instrument designer, invented the saxophone in 1846, died in poverty from natural causes on 2/4/1894, age 79
1916 ● Ray Conniff → Grammy-winning composer and instrumental pop-easy listening bandleader, “Somewhere My Love (Lara’s Theme)” (#9, 1966), died in a slip-and-fall bathtub accident on 10/12/2002, age 85
1932 ● Stonewall Jackson → Country singer and musician with 22 Country Top 20 hits from 1958 to 1971 and four crossover country-pop singles, including “Waterloo” (#4, Country #1, 1959), successfully sued The Grand Old Opry in Nashville for age discrimination and performed there through the 00s
1933 ● Joseph Pope → With brother Charles and others, vocals for R&B/soul The Tams, “What Kind Of Fool (Do You Think I Am)” (#9, 1963) and “There Ain’t Nothing Like Shaggin'” (UK #21, 1987), died on 3/16/1996, age 62
1937 ● Eugene Pitt → Founding member of R&B/doo wop vocal quintet The Jive Five, “My True Story” (#3, 1961)
1938 ● Jim Pike → Vocalist in close-harmony folk-pop trio The Lettermen, “When I Fall In Love” (#1, 1961) and 15 other Top 10 hits
1938 ● P.J. Proby (James Marcus Smith) → Texas-born rock ‘n’ roll singer and songwriter with a more success in England than at home, “Hold Me” (#70, UK #3, 1964), cabaret actor
1941 ● Doug Sahm → Tex-Mex rock ‘n roll and country-rock bandleader for The Sir Douglas Quintet, “She’s About A Mover” (#13, 1965), also played with The Texas Tornados and Los Super Seven, died from a heart attack on 11/18/1999, age 58
1941 ● Guy Clark → Grammy-winning Texas “outlaw” country and folk-rock guitarist and songwriter, wrote “L.A. Freeway” (Jerry Jeff Walker, #98, 1973) and “Desperados Waiting For A Train” (The Highwaymen, Country #15, 1985) plus dozens of songs for other artists, including Johnny Cash, Alan Jackson and Emmylou Harris, issued over 30 charting albums and won a 2014 Grammy Award for My Favorite Picture Of You (2013), died after a long illness concurrent with lymphoma on 5/17/2016, age 74
1947 ● George Young → Scottish rhythm guitarist in Aussie-based 60s pop-rock The Easybeats, “Friday On My Mind” (#16, 1967), producer for AC/DC and older brother of Angus and Malcolm Young
1948 ● Glenn Frey → Grammy-winning guitarist, singer and songwriter, member of Linda Ronstadt‘s backing band, which became country rock/L.A. rock Eagles, “One Of These Nights” (#1, 1975), solo, “You Belong To The City” (#2, 1985), TV and film actor, died from complications of rheumatoid arthritis, colitis and pneumonia following intestinal surgery on 1/18/2016, age 67
1948 ● Rushton Moreve (John Rushton Morey) → Early bassist for Canadian-American hard rock, proto-metal Steppenwolf, co-wrote “Magic Carpet Ride” (#3, 1968), left the band in 1968, died in a car accident on 7/1/1981, age 32
1950 ● Chris Glen → Scottish bassist in The Sensational Alex Harvey Band, “Delilah” (UK #7, 1975) and The Michael Schenker Group, solo
1961 ● Craig Goldie → Heavy metal guitarist in Rough Cutt, Giuffria (“Call To The Heart, ##15, 1984) and Dio (“Rainbow In The Dark,” (Mainstream Rock #14, 1983)
1963 ● Paul Brindley → Bassist for Brit alt-indie-rock The Sundays, “Here’s Where The Story Ends” (Modern Rock #1, 1990)
1964 ● Corey Glover → Lead singer for prog-funk-metal Living Colour, “Cult Of Personality” (#13, 1988), solo, actor
1964 ● Greg Graffin, Ph.D. → Co-founder, lead singer, songwriter and only constant member of L.A. punk rock Bad Religion, “Infected” (Mainstream Rock #33, 1995), received his doctorate from Cornell University and has lectured in life sciences and paleontology
1966 ● Paul Gilbert → Guitarist for pop-metal “shredder” band Mr. Big, “To Be With You” (#1, 1992)

November 07

1922 ● Al Hirt → Nicknamed “Jumbo” and “The Round Mound of Sound,” portly New Orleans-based Dixieland jazz and pop virtuoso trumpeter and bandleader with the Grammy-winning “Java” (#4, 1964), wrote the theme song to the TV crime show The Green Hornet, died of liver failure on 4/27/1999, age 76
1938 ● Delectus “Dee” Clark → Falsetto R&B/soul vocalist, “Raindrops” (#2, 1961) and five other Top 40 hits, died of a heart attack on 12/7/1990, age 52
1942 ● Johnny Rivers (John Henry Ramistella) → Early rock ‘n’ roll singer, songwriter and guitarist, “Secret Agent Man” (#3, 1966) and 15 other Top 40 hits, founded Soul City Records and produced The 5th Dimension (“Wedding Bell Blues,” #1, 1969), continues to perform in the 00s
1943 ● Dino Valenti (Chester W. Powers, Jr.) → Vocals and songwriter for psychedelic folk-rock Quicksilver Messenger Service, “Fresh Air” (#49, 1970), solo, wrote “Get Together” for The Youngbloods (#5, 1969), died on 11/16/1994, age 51
1943 ● Joni Mitchell (Roberta Joan Anderson) → Canadian pop-rock-jazz-fusion singer, songwriter and guitarist, “Help Me” (#7, 1974), wrote “Both Sides Now” for Judy Collins (#8, 1968) and “Woodstock” for Crosby, Stills, Nash & Young (#11, 1970)
1951 ● Kevin Scott MacMichael → Canadian guitarist and songwriter for New Wave pop-rock Cutting Crew, “(I Just) Died In Your Arms Tonight” (#1, 1987), died of lung cancer on 12/31/2002, age 51
1954 ● Robin Beck → Pop-rock vocalist, sang the Coca-Cola jingle “The First Time” (UK #1, 1988), back-up singer for Melissa Manchester, Leo Sayer and others
1957 ● Jellybean (John Benitez) → Puerto Rican drummer, guitarist, producer (Madonna, Michael Jackson, the Pointer Sisters and others), club DJ and remixer, solo artist, “Who Found Who?” (#16, Dance/Club #3, 1987)
1960 ● Tommy Thayer → Guitarist, songwriter and producer, worked with Kiss as a session player and back-up on tours and is now the lead guitarist and “Spaceman” character for the group
1963 ● Clint Mansell → Guitarist for dance-rock Pop Will Eat Itself, “X, Y & Zee” (Modern Rock #11, 1991)
1964 ● Liam O Maonlai → Co-founder, vocals and keyboards for Irish rockers Hothouse Flowers, “Don’t Go” (Modern Rock #7, 1988)
1967 ● Sharleen Spiteri → Vocals for Scottish blues-rock Texas, “In My Heart” (Alt Rock #14, 1991)
1970 ● Neil Hannon → Founder, singer and frontman for Irish orchestral-pop group The Divine Comedy, “National Express” (UK #8, 1999)
1971 ● Robin Finck → Lead guitarist for industrial rock Nine Inch Nails, “The Day The World Went Away” (#17, 1999), joined reincarnated hard rock Guns N’ Roses in 1998 as a side project
1978 ● Mark Daniel Read → Vocals for Brit-Norwegian pop-rock boy band A1, “Same Old Brand New You” (, 2000)
1983 ● Forrest Kline → Lead singer, chief songwriter and guitarist in emo-rock/power pop Hellogoodbye, “Here (In Your Arms)” (#14, 2006)
1988 ● Tinie Tempah (Patrick Chukwuemake Okogwu) → Brit rapper, singer, songwriter and record producer with multiple UK Top 10 hits as a lead solo or guest artist, including “Written In The Stars” (#12, UK #1, 2010)
1996 ● Lorde (Ella Yelich-O’Connor) → New Zealand pop singer with the debut, world-wide hit single “Royals” (#1, AUS #2, UK #1, 2013), the first New Zealander with a #1 hit in the US

November 08

1913 ● Arnold “Gatemouth” Moore → Booming-voiced ordained minister, gospel and Chicago blues singer and songwriter, wrote “Did You Ever Love A Women?” for B. B. King and “Somebody’s Got To Go” for Rufus Thomas, died of natural causes on 5/19/2004, age 90
1927 ● Ken Dodd → Brit music hall traditional stand-up comedian, songwriter and adult pop singer, “Tears” (UK #1, 1965) and 18 other UK Top 40 hits, TV and film actor
1927 ● Patti Page (Clara Ann Fowler) → Grammy-winning traditional adult pop singer, “(How Much Is) That Doggie In The Window?” (#1, 1953) and 13 other Top 40 hits, the best-selling female artist of the 50s, died from heart and lung failure on 1/1/2013, age 85
1929 ● Bertrand Russell “Bert” Berns → Pioneer and prolific rock ‘n’ roll songwriter and producer, wrote or co-wrote “Twist And Shout”, “Hang On Sloopy”, “Here Comes The Night” and many others, co-founded Bang! Records, died from a heart attack on 12/31/1967, age 38
1942 ● Johnny Perez → Original member and percussion for roots/psych-rock The Sir Douglas Quintet, “She’s About A Mover” (#13, UK #15, 1965), later owned Topanga Skyline Studios, died from cirrhosis of the liver on 9/11/2012, age 69
1944 ● Bonnie Bramlett (Bonnie Lynn O’Farrell) → Blue-eyed soul and blues-rock singer, first Caucasian in Ike and Tina Turner‘s backing vocal group The Ikettes, one half of the husband-and-wife duo Delaney & Bonnie, “Never Ending Song Of Love” (#13, 1971), solo, TV actress
1944 ● Jack Jones → Drummer for underappreciated and little known (except in Germany) Britbeat/power pop The Creation, “Painter Man” (UK #36, GER #8, 1967)
1944 ● Robert Nix → Original drummer and songwriter for Southern rock Atlanta Rhythm Section, “Imaginary Lover” (#7, 1978)
1944 ● Rodney Slater → Founding member and sax player for Brit comedy-rock Bonzo Dog Doo Dah Band, “I’m The Urban Spaceman” (UK #5, 1968)
1945 ● Donald Murray → Founding member and drummer for pop-rock The Turtles, “Happy Together” (#1, 1967), died from complications from ulcer surgery on 3/22/1996, age 50
1946 ● John “The Big Figure” Martin → Founding member and first drummer for Brit pub-rock Dr. Feelgood, “Milk And Alcohol” (UK #9, 1979)
1946 ● John Farrar → Guitarist for instrumental pop-rock The Shadows, “Apache” (Worldwide #1, 1960), then backing musician, songwriter and producer for Olivia Newton-John, wrote or co-wrote several of her hits, including “You’re The One That I Want” (#1, 1978)
1946 ● Roy Wood → Co-founder, guitar and vocals for Brit psych-rock The Move, “Blackberry Way” (UK #1, 1968) and Electric Light Orchestra, “Telephone Line” (#7, 1977)
1947 ● Minnie Riperton → Sweet chirping pop singer and songwriter, “Loving You” (#1, 1974), died of cancer on 7/12/1979, age 31
1949 ● Alan Berger → Bassist for New Jersey rock ‘n roll bar band Southside Johnny & The Asbury Jukes, “Talk To Me” (1978)
1949 ● Bonnie Raitt → Eight-time Grammy-winning roots and blues-rock singer, songwriter and slide guitarist, “Something To Talk About” (#5, 1991)
1949 ● Lee Freeman → Rhythm guitar, vocals and songwriting for 60s psych-pop-rock Strawberry Alarm Clock, “Incense And Peppermints” (#1, 1967), died from cancer on 2/14/2010, age 60
1951 ● Gerald Alston → Joined R&B/doo wop then sweet soul quintet The Manhattans (“Kiss And Say Goodbye,” #1, 1976) in 1970 on lead vocals to replace the deceased George Smith, left for a solo career from 1988 to 1995 (“Slow Motion,” R&B #3, 1990), rejoined and continues into the 10s
1954 ● Rickie Lee Jones → Jazz, R&B/soul and pop-rock singer and songwriter “Chuck E’s In Love” (#4, 1979)
1957 ● Porl Thompson → Guitar, saxophone and keyboards for post-punk art-glam-goth rock The Cure, “Friday I’m In Love” (Modern Rock #1, 1992)
1958 ● Terry Lee Miall → Drummer for post-punk/New Wave pop-rock Adam And The Ants, “Goody Two-Shoes” (#12, 1982)
1961 ● Leif Garrett (Leif Per Nervik) → Pop-rock teen idol singer, “I Was Made For Dancin'” (#10, 1978), film and TV actor
1964 ● Cubie Burke → Briefly joined his five siblings in the “First Family of Soul,” Chicago R&B/soul The Five Stairsteps (“O-o-h Child,” #7, R&B #14, 1970) but left to become a professional dancer with Alvin Ailey and other troupes, died from a brain injury on 5/14/2014, age 49
1969 ● Jimmy Chaney → Drummer for alt rock/funk-metal Jimmie’s Chicken Shack, “Do Right” (Modern Rock #12, 1999)
1970 ● Diana King → Jamaican-born reggae dancehall singer and songwriter, “Shy Guy” (#13, 1994)
1970 ● Gareth “Rat” Pring → Guitarist for indie punk-rock Ned’s Atomic Dustbin, “Not Sleeping Around” (Modern Rock #1, 1992)
1971 ● Tech N9ne (Aaron Dontez Yates) → Hardcore rapper known for his dynamic rhymes schemes and speed rapping, released over a dozen official albums including The Gates Mixed Plate (#13, 2010), co-founder of Strange Music record label
1977 ● Tiffani Wood → Singer in pre-fab Aussie all-girl pop vocal quintet Bardot, “Poison” (Aus. #1, 2000)
1985 ● Jack Osbourne → Record label talent scout, TV actor, star of The Osbournes and Adrenaline Junkie, son of Ozzy Osbourne

November 09

1936 ● Mary Allin Travers → Perhaps the most important female figure in the folk-revival movement and anti-war protest songs of the 60s, vocals and guitar for seminal folk trio Peter, Paul & Mary “Blowin’ In The Wind” (#2, AC #1, 1963), died from complications of leukemia on 9/16/2009, age 72
1937 ● Roger McGough → Poet, lyricist and vocalist in comedy-pop The Scaffold, “Lily The Pink” (UK #1, 1968) and “Thank U Very Much” (#69, UK #4, 1968), BBC Radio host and voice-overs for commercials
1941 ● John Dean → Bass vocals for blue-eyed soul/doo wop The Reflections (“(Just Like) Romeo And Juliet,” #6, 1964), continues to perform with the group into the 10s
1941 ● Tom Fogerty → Rhythm guitar in the shadow of his brother and band frontman John Fogerty in roots rock/”swamp” rock Creedence Clearwater Revival (“Down On The Corner,” #3, 1969), left in 1971 for a middling solo career, contracted AIDS from blood transfusions during back surgery and died several years later on 9/6/1990, age 48
1943 ● Lee Graziano → Drums for one hit wonder pop-rock American Breed, “Bend Me Shape Me” (Top 10, 1968)
1944 ● Phil May (Philip Arthur Dennis Kattner) → Vocals for raunchy R&B/blues-rock British Invasion band The Pretty Things, “Don’t Bring Me Down” (UK #10, 1964)
1946 ● Ruben Armand “Benny” Mardones → One hit wonder blue-eyed soul singer, “Into The Night” (# 11, 1980 and #20, 1989), one of only 10 artists to have charted the same song in the Top 20 on two separate occasions
1948 ● Alan Gratzer → Drums and percussion for arena rock REO Speedwagon, “Keep On Lovin’ You” (#1, 1980)
1948 ● Joe Bouchard → Bassist in hard rock/pop metal Blue Öyster Cult, “(Don’t Fear) The Reaper” (#12, 1976)
1949 ● Tommy Caldwell → Founding member and bassist for Southern rock The Marshall Tucker Band, “Heard It In A Love Song” (#14, 1977), died in a car crash on 4/28/1980, age 30
1950 ● Dennis Provisor → Keyboardist, vocals and songwriter for AM Top 40 pop-rockers The Grass Roots, “Midnight Confessions” (#5, 1968), continued to tour into the 00s with the band and with his own The Hits on the oldies circuit
1953 ● Michael J. Mullins → Vocals for Brit dance-pop band Modern Romance, “Can You Move” (Dance/Club #2, 1981) and “Best Years Of Our Lives” (UK #4, 1982)
1954 ● Dennis Stratton → Guitarist for Brit heavy metal Iron Maiden, “Flight Of Icarus” (Mainstream Rock #8, 1983)
1960 ● Demetra Plakas → Drummer for all-girl post-punk/grunge band L7, “Pretend We’re Dead” (Alt Rock #8, 1992)
1962 ● Steve “Silk” Hurley → Club DJ, pioneering Chicago house-music producer, songwriter, and four time Grammy Award-nominee, “Work It Out” (Dance #3, 1989), two time Remixer of the Year (1999 and 2000) and Best Remixed Recording (2002 and 2003),
1969 ● Sandy “Pepa” Denton → Vocals in female hip hop trio Salt-N-Pepa, “Let’s Talk About Sex” (#13, 1991)
1970 ● Scarface (Brad Jordan) → Rapper and songwriter in gangsta/horror-rap trio Geto Boys, “Mind Playing Tricks On Me” (#23, 1991), then Dirty South solo rap career, “Smile” (#12, Rap #2, 1997)
1970 ● Susan Tedeschi → Electric blues and soul guitarist with roots in gospel, singer, songwriter and bandleader with multiple Grammy nominations, frontwoman for the Susan Tedeschi Band and, in collaboration with her husband Derek Trucks, Soul Stew Revival and the Tedeschi Trucks Band, solo with multiple albums, including Back To The River (Blues Albums #1, 2008)
1973 ● Nick Lachey → Lead vocals in adult contemporary/sweet soul boy band 98 Degrees, “Give Me Just One Night (Una Noche)” (#2, 2000)
1974 ● Joe C. (Joseph Callaja) → Diminutive rapper, musician, touring band member and comic sidekick for rapper Kid Rock (“Only God Knows Why,” #19, Mainstream, Rock #5, 1999), died in his sleep from complications of lifelong coeliac disease on 11/16/2000, age 26
1977 ● Sisqó (Mark Andrews) → R&B/urban soul and hip hop bad boy with Dru Hill, “How Deep Is Your Love” (#3, 1998), then solo, “Thong Song” (#3, 2000)
1984 ● Delta Goodrem → Australian TV actress (Nina Tucker in soap opera Neighbours) and pop singer, “Lost Without You” (Adult Contemporary #18, Australia #1, 2005) plus six other Australian #1 singles

November 10

1916 ● Edward William “Billy” May, Jr. → Highly acclaimed Big Band leader, composer, arranger and trumpeter, fronted Billy May & His Orchestra, and charted a version of “Charmine” (#17, 1952), arranged Frank Sinatra‘s acclaimed concept albums Come Fly With Me (1958), Come Dance With Me! (1959) and Come Swing with Me! (1961). wrote the theme songs to TV’s The Green Hornet (1966) , Batman (1967) and The Mod Squad (1968), among others, died of a heart attack on 1/22/2004, age 87
1933 ● Bonny “Mack” Rice → R&B songwriter and singer best known for writing the classic and enduring “Mustang Sally” for himself (R&B #15) and Wilson Pickett (#23, R&B #6, 1966), also co-wrote “Respect Yourself” for The Staple Singers (#12, R&B #2, 19761) and songs covered by many others, died at home in Detroit from complications of Alzheimer’s disease on 6/27/2016, age 82
1939 ● Tommy “Bubba” Facenda → Back-up singer for Gene Vincent in his band, the Blue Caps in the late 50s, left the group and became a one hit wonder rock ‘n’ roll singer with the anthemic “High School U.S.A.” (#28, 1959) and its 40 different versions mentioning different schools by region, later became a firefighter in Virginia, toured with a reunited Blue Caps in the 80s
1940 ● David Edward “Screaming Lord” Sutch → Brit comedy-rock bandleader and solo artist, “Jack The Ripper” (1963), wannabe politician and leader of The Official Monster Raving Loony Party, fought in numerous parliamentary elections without winning, committed suicide on 6/16/1999, age 58
1941 ● Kyu Sakamoto (Hisashi Oshima) → Japanese pop star with the one hit wonder “Sukiyaki” (#1, 1963), the first US #1 by a Japanese artist, died in a commercial airliner crash on 8/12/1985, age 43
1944 ● Tim Rice → Multiple award-winning film, theater and Broadway lyricist and producer, collaborated with Andrew Lloyd Webber on Jesus Christ Superstar (1970) and with Elton John on The Lion King (1994), among many other shows
1945 ● Donna Fargo (Yvonne Vaughn) → Country-pop singer and songwriter, “The Happiest Girl In The Whole U.S.A.” (#11, 1972)
1946 ● Leonard “Chip” Hawkes → Bassist for 60s Britbeat Brian Poole & The Tremeloes, co-wrote “(Call Me) Number One” (#27, UK #2, 1969), moved to Nashville in the 70s to write and record with Waylon Jennings and others, reformed The Tremeloes in 1979, managed his son, pop star Chesney Hawkes and formed his own band in the 90s, continues to tour and perform into the 10s on the European oldies circuit with various retro bands
1947 ● Dave Loggins → Pop-rock one hit wonder singer and songwriter, “Please Come To Boston” (#5, 1974), cousin of Kenny Loggins
1947 ● Glen Buxton → Founder and guitarist for glam-rock/metal Alice Cooper band, co-wrote “School’s Out” (#7, 1972), died of pneumonia on 10/19/1997, age 49
1948 ● Greg Lake → Prog-rock guitarist and songwriter, founding member of prog/space-rock King Crimson, “The Court Of The Crimson King” (#80, 1970), then supergroup Emerson, Lake & Palmer, “Lucky Man” (#48, 1971), solo
1950 ● Bram Tchaikovsky (Peter Bramall) → Guitar and vocals for power pop/rock The Motors, “Airport” (UK #4, 1978), solo, “Girl Of My Dreams” (#37, 1979)
1950 ● Ronnie Hammond → Lead singer for Southern rock Atlanta Rhythm Section, “Imaginary Lover” (#7, 1978), solo, died of a heart attack on 3/14/2011, age 60
1954 ● Mario Cipollina → Bassist for pop-rock bar band Huey Lewis & The News, “The Power Of Love” (#1, 1985)
1959 ● Frank Maudsley → Bassist for bizarrely-teased hair New Wave pop-rock A Flock of Seagulls, “I Ran (So Far Away)” (#9, 1982)
1959 ● Laura MacKenzie Phillips → Film and TV actress, singer and songwriter in The New Mamas & The Papas, daughter of “Papa” John Phillips
1961 ● Norman “Junior” Giscombe → Brit R&B singer and songwriter, “Mama Used To Say” (#30, R&B #2, 1982) and duet with Kim Wilde, “Another Step (Closer To You)” (UK #8, 1987)
1965 ● David Hawes → Bassist for Brit indie rock/shoegazing band Catherine Wheel, “Black Metallic” (Modern Rock #9, 1991)
1966 ● Steve Mackey → Bassist for alt rock/Britpop Pulp, “Common People” (UK #2, 1995)
1967 ● Andrew Vowles → Co-founder and vocals for electro-dance/trip hop progenitor duo Massive Attack, “Unfinished Sympathy” (UK #13, 1991)
1968 ● Steve Brookstein → Blue-eyed soul singer and winner of the first series of UK TV show The X Factor in 2004, “Against All Odds” (UK #1, 2004)
1969 ● Paul “Kermit” Leveridge → Rapper and vocals with alt Brit-pop Black Grape, “England’s Irie” (UK #6, 1996)
1970 ● Derry Brownson → Keyboards and samples for Brit dance-rock quintet EMF (Epsom Mad Funkers), “Unbelievable” (#1, 1990)
1970 ● Warren G (Warren Griffin III) → Hip hop producer and West Coast rapper, “Regulate” (#2, 1994)
1971 ● Big Punisher (Christopher Rios) → Corpulent Latino rapper “Still Not A Player” (#24, Dance/Club #3, 1998), died from obesity-related heart failure on 2/7/2000, age 28
1973 ● Jacqueline Abbott → Lead vocals for alt pop-rock The Beautiful South, “A Little Time” (UK #1, 1990)
1975 ● Jim Adkins → Lead singer and guitarist for alt rock/neo-punk Jimmy Eat World, “The Middle” (#5, Adult Top 40 #2, 2002)
1978 ● Drew McConnell → Bassist for indie psych-rock Babyshambles, “Delivery” (#6, 2007)
1978 ● Eve Jihan Jeffers → Hip hop singer and MC, “Let Me Blow Ya Mind” (#2, 2001)
1979 ● Christopher Joannou → Co-founder and bassist in Aussie alt-grunge-rock Silverchair, “Tomorrow” (Modern Rock #1, 1994)
1983 ● Miranda Lambert → Country-pop singer and songwriter, as a solo artist scored fifteen Country Top 20 hits and several crossover singles, including “The House That Built Me” (#28, Country #1, 2010), performed numerous charting duets with others, including “We Were Us” (#26, Country #1, 2013) with Keith Urban, fronts the girl group Pistol Annies

November 11

1927 ● Mose Allison → Jazz and blues pianist, singer, songwriter and bandleader, his songs have been covered by The Who, John Mayall, Elvis Costello, The Rolling Stones, Van Morrison and others
1929 ● LaVern Baker (Delores Williams) → R&B and jazz-pop singer, “Jim Dandy” (#17, 1956) plus 7 other Top 40 and 12 other R&B Top 10 hits, died from coronary disease on 3/10/1997, age 67
1930 ● Walter Louis “Hank” Garland → Highly-regarded rockabilly, country and jazz studio musician, recorded with Elvis Presley, Roy Orbison, Johnny Cash and others, issued an improbable but well-received jazz album, Jazz Winds From A New Direction (1961), stopped recording following a near fatal 1966 car accident, died from an infection on 12/27/2004, age 74
1936 ● Jack Keller → Composer, songwriter and record producer, wrote or co-wrote several teen pop and pop-rock hits in the 50s and 60s, including “Just Between You And Me” (The Chordettes, #8, 1957) and “Everybody’s Somebody’s Fool” (Connie Francis, #1, 1960), composed TV theme songs for Bewitched, Gidget and other programs, produced The Monkees‘ first album and for artists in Nashville in the 80s, died from leukemia on 4/1/2005, age 68
1936 ● Opal Courtney, Jr. → Vocals for pioneer R&B/doo wop The Spaniels, “Goodnight, Sweetheart, Goodnight” (R&B #5, 1954), died after a heart attack on 9/18/2008, age 71
1938 ● Roger Lavern (Roger Keith Jackson) → Keyboards for Brit instrumental rock ‘n’ roll The Tornados, “Telstar” (#1, 1962), the first major US hit by a British group, died from prostate cancer on 6/15/2013, age 74
1939 ● Albie Galione → Vocals in white R&B/doo wop quartet The Passions, “Gloria” (1958)
1940 ● Dennis Coffey → R&B, soul and funk guitarist, sessionman and solo artist, member of The Funk Brothers, Motownn’s house band which provided nearly all instrumentation behind every Motown hit, first white artist to perform on Soul Train when he played his instrumental “Scorpio” (#6, 1971) in January 1972, issued 14 solo albums from 1969 to 2011 and continues to perform in his hometown of Detroit into the 10s
1941 ● Peter Meaden → The “Mod God,” publicist and manager for numerous rock bands, especially during the Mod subculture period in the 60s U.K., briefly managed The Who and later Captain Beefheart, died from a barbiturate overdose on 7/29/1978. age 36
1943 ● Mac Kissoon (Gerald Farthing) → Vocals with his sister, Katherine Farthing, in one hit wonder easy listening/bubblegum pop duo Mac & Katie Kissoon (“Chirpy Chirpy Cheep Cheep,” #20, 1971), she went on to decades of session backing vocals work while his career stalled as a member of James Last‘s ensemble
1945 ● Chris Dreja → Rhythm guitar and songwriter for blues-rock The Yardbirds, “For Your Love” (#6, 1965)
1945 ● Vince Martell (Vincent Martemucci) → Lead guitar and vocals for psych-rock Vanilla Fudge, “You Keep Me Hangin’ On” (#6, 1968)
1947 ● Pat Daugherty → Bassist for Southern raunch-rock Black Oak Arkansas, “Jim Dandy To The Rescue” (Top 30, 1973)
1950 ● Jim Peterick → Founder, guitarist and lead writer for blue-eyed soul The Ides of March, “Vehicle” (#2, 1970) and Survivor, “Eye Of The Tiger” (#1, 1982)
1952 ● Paul Cowsill → Vocals for family pop band The Cowsills, “The Rain, The Park And Other Things” (#2, 1967) and theme song from Broadway musical Hair, (#2, 1969), inspiration for the TV show The Partridge Family
1953 ● Andy Partridge → Co-founder, guitarist and songwriter for quirky New Wave synth-pop XTC, “Making Plans For Nigel” (UK #17, 1979) and side project for the band under the pseudonym The Dukes Of Stratosphear
1953 ● Marshall Crenshaw → Power pop singer and songwriter, “Someday, Someway” (#36, 1982), movie actor, portrayed John Lennon in the road version of Beatlemania
1956 ● Ian Craig Marsh → Guitarist and founding member of late-70s synth-pop pioneers The Human League, “Don’t You Want Me” (#1, 1981), left to form 80s synth-pop Heaven 17, “Temptation” (UK #2, 1983) and “Contenders” (Dance/Club #6, 1987)
1957 ● Tony “Gad” Robinson → Bass, vocals and 40-year member of long-lived roots reggae Aswad (Arabic for “black”), “Don’t Turn Around” (, 1988), one of the most popular and successful Brit reggae bands
1962 ● Gunnar Mathias “Mic” Michaeli → Keyboardist for Swedish hard rock/glam-metal Europe, “The Final Countdown” (#8, 1986)
1966 ● Peaches (Merrill Beth Nisker) → Canadian electronic groovebox rapper known for her vulgar lyrics, sexual themes and flamboyant stage presence, “Wild Thing” (Dance #4, 2007)
1969 ● Gary Powell → Drummer for indie/punk revival The Libertines, “Can’t Stand Me Now” (UK #2, 2004), played with the New York Dolls on their 2004 reunion tour, then indie rock Dirty Pretty Things, “Bang Bang You’re Dead” (UK #5, 2006)
1973 ● Jason White → Touring guitarist for 12 years in post-grunge alt rock/punk revival Green Day, “Boulevard Of Broken Dreams” (#2, 2004), joined the band as a full member in 2012, also with punk/garage rock, no touring, fun only supergroup Pinhead Gunpowder
1974 ● Static Major (Stephen Garrett) → Grammy-winning R&B singer, rapper, songwriter and record producer, member of the R&B trio Playa, “Cheers 2 U” (#38, 1998), died during a surgical procedure to treat a rare blood disorder on 2/25/2008, age 33

November 12

1906 ● Booker T. Washington “Bukka” White → Delta blues guitarist, singer and performer, “Parchman Farm Blues” (1940), other artists have covered his work, including Bob Dylan, Fixin’ To Die Blues” (1962), died of cancer on 2/26/1977, age 70
1917 ● Jo Elizabeth Stafford → Classical-trained singer who chose traditional, breezy pop and sultry jazz for a career that ran from the 30s to the 80s, “You Belong To Me” (#1, 1952) also the first song by a female artist to reach #1 in the UK, occasional film acting and parody records, died from congestive heart failure on 7/16/2008, age 90
1931 ● Bob Crewe → Producer and songwriter for Top 40 pop vocal quartet The Four Seasons, “Big Girls Don’t Cry” (#1, 1962), also produced hits by Mitch Ryder & The Detroit Wheels, Freddy Cannon, Roberta Flack and his own band, The Bob Crewe Connection, “Music To Watch Girls By” (#15, 1967), injured his brain in a fall and died from its effects four years later on 9/11/2014, age 82
1936 ● Charlotte Davis → Vocals in R&B/doo wop The Tune Weavers, “Happy, Happy Birthday Baby” (#5, 1957)
1936 ● Mort Shuman → Singer, pianist and prolific pop-rock songwriter, often in collaboration with Doc Pomus, wrote or co-wrote “Viva Las Vegas,” “Teenager In Love,” “This Magic Moment” and many others, died from complications following liver surgery on 11/3/1991, age 54
1939 ● Ruby Nash Curtis → Lead singer in R&B/soul vocal group Ruby & The Romantics, “Our Day Will Come” (#1, 1963) and two additional Top 20 hits
1941 ● Jerry Scholl → Vocals in one hit wonder blue-eyed R&B/doo wop quintet The Mello-Kings, “Tonite, Tonite” (#77, 1957)
1943 ● Arthur Paul “Pooch” Tavares → Vocals in five brother R&B/funk-disco Tavares, “Heaven Must Be Missing An Angel” (#15, 1976)
1943 ● Brian Hyland → Pre-Beatles bubblegum-pop teen idol singer, “Sealed With A Kiss” (#3, 1962)
1943 ● Jimmy Hayes → Vocals in a cappella The Persuasions, “Chain Gang” (1971) and “I Really Got It Bad For You” (#56, 1974)
1943 ● John Walker (John J. Maus) → Guitar and vocals in pop-rock trio The Walker Brothers, “Make It Easy On Yourself” (US #16, UK #1, 1965), died from liver cancer on 5/7/2011, age 67
1944 ● Booker T. Jones → Organist and frontman for Stax Records house band Booker T. & The MG’s, “Green Onions” (#3, 1966), solo
1945 ● Neil Young → Grammy-winning, venerable Canadian-born country-folk-rock singer/songwriter, “Heart Of Gold” (#1, 1972) and “Downtown” (Mainstream Rock #6, 1995), member of Crosby, Stills, Nash & Young
1947 ● Buck Dharma (Donald Roeser) → Guitar and vocals for hard rock/pop metal Blue Öyster Cult, wrote “(Don’t Fear) The Reaper” (#12, 1976)
1948 ● Errol Brown → Jamaican vocalist and frontman for Brit interracial R&B/soul-disco Hot Chocolate, “You Sexy Thing” (#3, 1976) and 27 other UK Top 40 hits, including one in every year from 1970 to 1984, died from liver cancer on 5/6/2015, age 66
1952 ● Laurence Juber → Grammy-winning guitarist, played lead for Paul McCartney‘s Wings (1978-81), sessions, solo
1953 ● Malcolm “Calum” Macdonald → Percussion for Scottish Celtic folk-rock Runrig, “An Ubhal As Airde (The Highest Apple)” (UK #18, 1995)
1955 ● Leslie McKeown → Vocals for Scottish teen-pop boy band Bay City Rollers, “Saturday Night” (#1, 1976)
1964 ● David Ellefson → Bassist for hard rock/metal Metallica, then thrash-metal Megadeth, “Symphony Of Destruction” (Mainstream #29, 1992)
1964 ● James Victor “Vic” Chestnutt → Quadriplegic singer, songwriter and guitarist known for his dark, haunting but comic roots rock style and 17 albums, two produced by Michael Stipe of R.E.M., and songs performed by Madonna, the Indigo Girls, Smashing Pumpkins, R.E.M. and others on the charity album Sweet Relief II: The Gravity Of The Situation (1993), died while in a muscle relaxant overdose-induced coma on 12/25/2009, age 45
1968 ● Jo Dunne → Bass guitar in all-girl New Wave pop-punk quartet Fuzzbox (originally We’ve Got A Fuzz Box And We’re Gonna Use It), “International Rescue” (UK #11, 1989)
1976 ● Tevin Campbell → Teenaged hip hop and R&B/soul singer, “Tell Me What You Want Me To Do” (#6, 1991) and four other Top 40 hits between 1990 and 1994
1984 ● Omarion (Omari Ishmael Grandberry) → Vocals for R&B/hip hop urban boy band B2K, “Bump, Bump, Bump” (#1, 2002)

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